English Courses


Creative Writing Courses


CRWR 210. INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 or ENGL 201.
This course introduces students to the process, techniques and forms of creative writing including poetry, fiction and nonfiction.

CRWR 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

CRWR 311. FORM AND THEORY OF FICTION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CRWR 210.
Style and the techniques of fiction, including a delineation of the development of major technical trends in fiction.

CRWR 312. FORM AND THEORY OF POETRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CRWR 210.
An intensive study of the history and current use of prosody and poetics and the application of traditional and innovative theories of contemporary poetry.

CRWR 313. FORM AND THEORY OF LITERARY NONFICTION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CRWR 210.
Students will study the nature of literary nonfiction. Contemporary sub-genres to be studied may include nature writing, travel writing, science writing, the memoir, literary journalism and others.

CRWR 314. ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING–POETRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CRWR 210 with a minimum grade ≥3.0 or permission of instructor.
This course is an intensive study in writing poetry, including the reading of contemporary and modern poetry to further students' study of craft. Extensive poetry and craft reading as well as completing a poetry portfolio is required.

CRWR 315. ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING–SHORT STORY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CRWR 210 with a minimum grade ≥3.0 or permission of instructor.
This course is an intensive study in writing literary short stories, including the readings on craft and contemporary modern fiction. Students will write two-three short stories which will be critiqued by instructor and peers.

CRWR 397. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

CRWR 398. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

CRWR 414. LITERARY EDITING AND DESIGN. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 270, ENGL 271, CRWR 210.
The history of literary magazine publishing in America since 1950. Also typography, layout, graphics, and editorial vision. Students will be asked to examine and discuss various influential literary magazines of the past as well as the present and to produce a mock-up of their own literary magazine.

CRWR 415. LITERARY EDITING AND DESIGN. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated up to six quarters.
Pre-requisites: CRWR 417.
Reading and critiquing manuscript submissions to Willow Springs, EWU nationally recognized literary journal.

CRWR 416. WILLOW SPRINGS EDITIONS INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CRWR 417.
Students market, distribute, promote, sell, and ship the titles already published by Willow Springs Editions, and advertise, organize and manage the Spokane Prize for Short Fiction competition.

CRWR 417. CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated frequently.
Pre-requisites: CRWR 210.
Workshop in various genres, e.g., fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, drama, script writing or translation. Different genres and subjects will be indicated in the quarterly course listings and on the student’s permanent record.

CRWR 469. LITERATURE OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: ENGL 469.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 343 or ENGL 344.
This course is a survey of Northwestern literature from 1800 to the present time, including representative exploration journals as well as more recent works by such writers as Richard Hugo, James Welch, Carolyn Kizer and Ursula LeGuin. Addresses questions of geography and regional culture.

CRWR 491. CREATIVE WRITING SENIOR THESIS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CRWR 311 or CRWR 312, 2 sections of CRWR 417.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
A class for senior creative writing majors. Students will revise poetry, fiction and essays from previous creative writing classes, culminating in a final portfolio of polished literary work. A third of the class will be workshops, a third discussion of assigned literary text to supplement the writing of the thesis and a third discussion of career issues (publishing, employment, graduate school).

CRWR 495. INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Internship.

CRWR 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

CRWR 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

CRWR 498. SEMINAR. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: if topic is literature, this course includes the prerequisite and may be cross-listed with ENGL 498.
Notes: may be repeated for credit; the topic covered will be listed on the student’s permanent record.
Pre-requisites: grades ≥2.5 or better in ENGL 270 and ENGL 271 (if topic is literature).
Special topics in creative writing or literature.

CRWR 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the director of the Creative Writing program, instructor, department chair and college dean.
Independent study under faculty direction, adapted to individual needs of the students.

CRWR 514. LITERARY EDITING AND DESIGN. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
The class will study the history of literary magazine publishing in America since 1950. It will also study typography, layout, graphics, and editorial vision. Students will be asked to examine and discuss various influential literary magazines of the past as well as the present and to produce a mock-up of their own literary magazine.

CRWR 515. INTERNSHIP LITERARY EDITING AND DESIGN. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
A practicum in literary production. The course offers hands-on training in connection with the literary magazine Willow Springs. Individually assigned projects typically include reading and editing submissions, proofreading, copy editing, layout, production, and marketing.

CRWR 517. GRADUATE WRITING WORKSHOP: FICTION, POETRY, LITERARY NONFICTION, DRAMA, SCRIPTWRITING OR TRANSLATION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MFA students; or permission of instructor.
Classroom discussion of student writing, concentrating on editing and revision with a view to attaining publishable quality.

CRWR 539. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-5 Credits.

CRWR 569. LITERATURE OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST. 5 Credits.

A survey of Northwestern literature from 1800 to the present time, including representative exploration journals as well as more recent work by such writers as Hugo, Welch, Kizer, Bass, and LeGuin. The course also addresses questions of geography, economics, and regional culture as they relate to the literature. (Cross-listed ENGL 569)

CRWR 583. FICTION I-THE NOVEL. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MFA or English MA students or permission of instructor.
A study beginning with the early narratives, such as religious and mythic narratives, epics and folk tales, moving through such defining works as those by Chaucer, Boccaccio, Cervantes, and Grimmelshausen. The course ends with examination of eighteenth through mid-nineteenth century works by such authors as Stern, Defoe, the Brontes, Austen, Dickens, Stendahl, Eliot, Hawthorne, and Melville.

CRWR 584. FICTION II-THE SHORT FORM. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MFA or English MA students or permission of instructor.
A beginning point would be the mid-to-late nineteenth century work of Flaubert, Dostoevsky, and George Eliot. The course will then focus on the period of narrative exploration during the first 50 to 70 years of the 20th century. Examples of works examined would be those of Richardson, Joyce, Woolf, Kafka, Mann, Celine, Barnes, Robbe-Grillet, Sarraute, Stein, Wright, Borges, Faulkner, and O'Connor.

CRWR 585. FICTION III-THE CONTEMPORARIES. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MFA or English MA students or permission of instructor.
A survey of literature of the last 30 to 40 years with an emphasis on the worldwide explosion of printed fiction in several forms - the short story, the integrated collection, novel, and novella. The course might focus on a problem or on several writers. Examples of writers to be considered are Marquez, Morrison, Achebe, Barth, J. Berger, Welch, Munro, Mishima, and Pynchon.

CRWR 586. LITERARY NONFICTION I–ANCIENT ROOTS THROUGH THE 19TH CENTURY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MFA or English MA students or permission of instructor.
Intensive study of the nature and development of nonfiction, beginning with ancient Greek, Roman, Chinese, and Japanese writings and the Bible, moving to the nonfiction of Continental writers such as Kempe, Montaigne, Browne, Swift, Johnson, Addison and Steele, and Lamb, and on to American writers such as Emerson, Thoreau, Twain, and Muir. Forms such as oral traditions of indigenous peoples, exploration accounts, slave narratives, captive narratives, biography, autobiography, meditation, diaries/journals, and the essay may be considered.

CRWR 587. LITERARY NONFICTION II–20TH CENTURY AND BEYOND. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MFA or English MA students or permission of instructor.
Intensive study of the nature and variety of modern and contemporary literary nonfiction, including such established writers as Woolf, Orwell, White, Didion, Mailer, Tom Wolfe, Tobias Wolff, Kingston, Momaday, McPhee, Baldwin, Walker, Kincaid, Dillard, Eiseley, Sanders, Rodriguez and Haines, as well as lesser-known contemporary writers. Forms such as memoir, essay, short nonfiction, literary journalism and the nonfiction novel may be considered, as well as effects of the works on the world.

CRWR 588. LITERARY NONFICTION III–SELECTED TOPICS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MFA or English MA students or permission of instructor.
Advanced, close study of selected topics in creative nonfiction, such as nature writing, travel writing, oral history, memoir, diaries/journals, the personal essay, short nonfiction, radio commentary, literary journalism, biography, nonfiction translation, research methods, ethical questions, cross-cultural writing, political writing, historical writing, and science writing. More than one topic will be considered during the course.

CRWR 589. POETRY I-BACKGROUND AND THEORY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MFA or English MA students or permission of instructor.
A study of some early poetry important to the development of the art, including Sappho, Catullus, Horace, the poets of the Tang Dynasty, and the English Metaphysicals. It will also include discussions of traditional forms and prosody.

CRWR 590. POETRY II-THE MODERNS AND MODERNISM. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MFA or English MA students or permission of instructor.
The course will begin with the study of Dickinson and Whitman and move through the High Moderns" to Robert Lowell also include discussion of Symbolism, the Spanish poets, and the French Surrealists, and other non-English speaking poets of the period.

CRWR 592. POETRY III-CONTEMPORARY WORLD POETRY AND POETICS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MFA or English MA students or permission of instructor.
An intensive study of selected authors and literary developments, both national and international, since 1960.

CRWR 596. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

CRWR 597. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: only one workshop course for up to 3 credits may be used to fulfill graduate degree requirements.

CRWR 598. SEMINAR. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: if topic is literature, this course includes the prerequisite and may be cross-listed with ENGL 598.
This course deals with specialized aspects of creative writing or literature. A student may take the seminar several times. The exact content of the course will be indicated in the title to be entered on his or her permanent record.

CRWR 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

CRWR 600. THESIS. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

CRWR 602. MPA PORTFOLIO. 2 Credits.

An advanced reflective praxis project which a student, following the guidelines provided by the MPA program and with the advice and editorial review of the chair of his/her best work in the MPA program. The portfolio is presented and discussed as part of the comprehensive oral exam for the MPA degree.

CRWR 698. INTERNSHIP IN INSTRUCTION. 1-5 Credits.


English Courses


ENGL 100. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGLISH COMPOSITION. 5 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit; does not count toward the 180 credit requirement.
Pre-requisites: placement based on EWU writing placement test results or through General Advising.
Provides opportunities for students to acquire familiarity with the standard written language of college-educated Americans. Employs lectures, small group activities, tutoring and counseling to encourage and lead students to practice a variety of language skills. This course prepares students for ENGL 101.

ENGL 101. COLLEGE COMPOSITION: EXPOSITION AND ARGUMENTATION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 100, Writing Placement Test or General Advising.
Satisfies: university competencies, writing.
Provides opportunities for students to develop and enhance their written communication skills. Stresses the organization, development and support of ideas and perspective in exposition and argumentation as public discourse, familiarization with library resources and application of the rules and conventions of standard American English.

ENGL 111. WRITING FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: ELIC 111.
An integrated skills course to develop writing and grammar fluency in a variety of writing modalities through reading, writing and discussion to prepare students for the multifaceted demands of academic writing.

ENGL 112. COMPOSITION FOR MULTILINGUAL STUDENTS. 5 Credits.

Notes: students must earn a minimum grade ≥2.0 before being allowed to proceed to ENGL 101.
A course designed for the international student and those students whose native language is not English. Content is adapted to the needs of students in such areas as idiom, usage, reading comprehension and composition, as well as library activities.

ENGL 170. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: GECR for humanities and fine arts, list 1, literature.
An examination of literary approaches in human experience including short fiction, poetry and drama. Principal attention to the elements that make up literature, with supporting discussion of ideas, attitudes, problems and values.

ENGL 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-2 Credits.

ENGL 197. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

ENGL 199. INDEPENDENT STUDIES. 1-5 Credits.

ENGL 201. COLLEGE COMPOSITION: ANALYSIS, RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101, Writing Placement Test or general advising.
Satisfies: university proficiencies, writing.
Stresses research skills, analytical writing, logic and other skills necessary to comprehend, synthesize and respond intelligently to academic discourse. Practices source evaluation and documentation across the disciplines. A special study unit emphasizing effective use of library resources is included.

ENGL 209. MEDIA WRITING. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: JRNM 209.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
This course provides an introduction to the writing skills needed in journalism and public relations for print and digital platforms.

ENGL 270. INTRODUCTION TO FICTION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101; ENGL 201 recommended.
The basic elements of fiction. Through class discussions and writing assignments, students analyze, interpret, and evaluate individual short stories and a novella which are broadly representative of a variety of historical periods and narrative genres.

ENGL 271. INTRODUCTION TO POETRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101; ENGL 201 recommended.
The basic elements of poetry. Presentation similar to ENGL 270.

ENGL 273. CRITICAL METHODOLOGIES. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
This course is an introduction to the major ideas and questions in literary theory and criticism from Plato to the present.

ENGL 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

ENGL 299. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Special studies in English or composition. Such studies will vary according to faculty and student interest.

ENGL 309. GRAMMAR FOR PROFESSIONAL WRITERS. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: JRNM 309, TCOM 309.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Many professionals continue to struggle with grammar and usage rules throughout their careers. In this course, students will refresh and improve their knowledge of English grammar, style and usage rules. They will develop confidence in using correct punctuation, capitalization and verb forms, and learn how to create and employ different types of sentence structures, becoming proficient at writing clear, correct sentences to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences.

ENGL 315. TOPICS IN LITERATURE AND CULTURE. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated for credit if taken with a different topic.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
A thematically organized course dealing with literary and cultural topics as they are reflected in literature. Some representative topics are the following: The American Dream in Literature; The Image of Women in American Pioneer Literature; and The Colonial Experience in Literature.

ENGL 323. A GLOBAL VIEW THROUGH CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: EDUC 323.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
By reading and discussing a variety of children’s literature titles across several interrelated thematic units, students will examine cultural constructs, gain familiarity with international cultures, work toward empathy for other peoples and practice a critical reading stance about stories from around the world. Coursework will include papers, journals, large and small group discussions and presentations.

ENGL 340. SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I. 5 Credits.

Notes: English majors must have grades ≥2.5; non majors must have permission of the instructor.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201 and ENGL 271.
This course covers the history of British Literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to Milton, focusing on works of representative authors and examining changes in literary forms and conceptions of culture and society.

ENGL 341. SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE II. 5 Credits.

Notes: English majors must have grades ≥2.5; non majors must have permission of the instructor.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201 and ENGL 271.
This course covers the history of British literature beginning with the Restoration and ending with the Romantics, focusing on works of representative authors and examining changes in literary forms, including the beginnings of narrative form, as well as conceptions of culture and society.

ENGL 342. SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE III. 5 Credits.

Notes: English majors must have grades ≥2.5; non majors must have permission of the instructor.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201 and ENGL 271.
This course covers the history of British literature beginning with the Victorians and ending with the present, focusing on works of representative authors and examining changes in literary forms, including the novel, as well as conceptions of culture and society.

ENGL 343. SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I. 5 Credits.

Notes: English majors must have grades ≥2.5; non majors must have permission of the instructor.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201 and ENGL 271.
This course covers the history of American literature from the origin narratives to Transcendentalism, focusing on works of representative authors and examining changes in literary forms, including the short story, and in conceptions of American culture and society.

ENGL 344. SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II. 5 Credits.

Notes: English majors must have grades ≥2.5; non majors must have permission of the instructor.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201 and ENGL 271.
This course covers the history of American literature from the civil war to the present, focusing on works of representative authors and examining changes in literary forms including the short story, and in conceptions of American culture and society.

ENGL 350. SHAKESPEARE. 5 Credits.

Notes: English majors must have grades ≥2.5; non majors must have permission of the instructor.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201 and ENGL 271.
Reading and interpretation of the principal comedies, histories, tragedies, and sonnets of Shakespeare; usually includes intensive study of one play.

ENGL 360. LANGUAGE STRUCTURE AND USE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
The nature and function of language; approaches, concepts, component areas of linguistics.

ENGL 380. SURVEY OF NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: IDST 380.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201 or permission of instructor.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
Designed to introduce students to specific examples of narrative, ceremonial, ritualistic, religious and secular literatures from the oral traditions of Indian Nations in North America and South America. Also introduces students to contemporary genres (i.e., poetry, the short story, the novel and drama) as they emerge from the oral traditions, with the specific purpose of articulating the continuity as reflected in literary genres.

ENGL 381. CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: AAST 381.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Major African American literature of the 20th century: fiction, poetry, essay, autobiography and drama.

ENGL 382. STUDIES IN EPIC FANTASY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Selected works by Tolkien, Lewis, Eddison, Carter, Cabell, and others, with emphasis on the function of fantasy and its statements about contemporary society and the human imagination. Texts selected vary according to student interest.

ENGL 384. FOLKLORE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Surveys the nature of folklore in its theories and practices, with special attention to the function of the folk imagination. Topics include the oral tradition possessed by every group, widespread folk practices and beliefs, and the methods of their collection and study.

ENGL 385. MYTHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
A survey of classical Greek myths, with special attention to the stories used in literature, and an introduction to comparative mythology.

ENGL 387. LITERATURE OF THE BIBLE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Studies the literature of the Bible, both Old and New Testaments, in its historical, cultural, and linguistic settings through selected readings.

ENGL 389. WOMEN, LITERATURE AND SOCIAL CHANGE. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: WMST 389.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
Examines fictional images of women as these images reflect the changing roles and status of women from Greece to present, focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries.

ENGL 395. FIELDWORK. 1-10 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

ENGL 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

ENGL 397. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

ENGL 398. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

ENGL 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

ENGL 400. WOMEN AND MEN IN LITERATURE. 1 Credit.

Cross-listed: WMST 400.
This course teaches the integration of women authors, the ideas of men writing about women and ideas interesting to women in the study of literature. We will deal with textbook selections and a comparative treatment of women and men in a literature survey course. The course will provide a feminist approach and review the literature on gender balance.

ENGL 408. THE COMPOSITION PROCESS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Study and analysis of the cognitive steps taken and of the general process usually followed when a person writes clearly and effectively. Designed especially for those who are interested in the teaching of composition.

ENGL 421. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. 4 Credits.

Notes: non-majors must have permission of the instructor.
Pre-requisites: English majors must have grades ≥2.5 in ENGL 201, ENGL 270 and ENGL 271.
EagleNET will indicate specific topic to be considered. Offerings include picture books, fantasy literature, myths and folk tales, minority groups and new trends in children’s literature.

ENGL 436. SEMINAR IN LITERATURE I: MAJOR AUTHORS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Three of the five English survey courses. Two of ENGL 340, ENGL 341, ENGL 342 and either ENGL 343 or ENGL 344.
This seminar course, through extensive reading and writing as well as student presentations, focuses on the work of major authors from either British, American, Commonwealth, or World literature. It considers their biography and the scope, influence, and development of their achievement, as well as the stature of their principal works. The choice of authors will vary with the instructor.

ENGL 437. SEMINAR IN LITERATURE II: STUDIES IN GENRE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Three of the five English survey courses. Two of ENGL 340, ENGL 341, ENGL 342 and either ENGL 343 or ENGL 344.
This seminar course, through extensive reading and writing as well as student presentations, focuses on a genre or genres in British, American, Commonwealth and/or World literature. Genres studied may include, but are not limited too, nonfiction, prose, poetry, film, drama and electronic media. The choice of genres will vary with the instructor.

ENGL 438. SEMINAR IN LITERATURE III: LITERARY ERAS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Three of the five English survey courses. Two of ENGL 340, ENGL 341, ENGL 342 and either ENGL 343 or ENGL 344.
This seminar course, through extensive reading and writing as well as student presentations, focuses on a specific era in literary history. The selection of literary era will vary with the instructor.

ENGL 439. SEMINAR IN LITERATURE IV: SPECIAL TOPICS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Three of the five English survey courses. Two of ENGL 340, ENGL 341, ENGL 342 and either ENGL 343 or ENGL 344.
This seminar course, through extensive reading and writing as well as student presentations, focuses on a thematic issue in either British, American, Commonwealth, or World literature. These courses will explore the continuity of ideas across literary periods and cultures. The choice of topics will vary with the instructor.

ENGL 450. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SHAKESPEARE. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated, the particular subject matter is described by the added wording in the title and can be substituted for ENGL 436.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 340 and ENGL 350.
This seminar course draws upon special topics such as dark and light comedy, the tragic heroes, Shakespeare history, etc., at the choice of the  instructor.

ENGL 452. CHAUCER. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 340.
This course involves reading and interpretation of the chief poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer. This course can be substituted for ENGL 436.

ENGL 459. GRAMMAR FOR TEACHERS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Major features of English grammar. Course covers word formation; part of speech identification; and the analysis of phrases, clauses, and sentences.

ENGL 460. MODERN GRAMMAR. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201 and ENGL 459; ENGL 360 is recommended.
Analysis of major syntactic rules of English from the standpoint of transformational grammar.

ENGL 461. SURVEY OF PSYCHOLINGUISTICS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 360.
A survey of psycholinguistic process: language comprehension, production, and acquisition.

ENGL 464. GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 459 or equivalent knowledge of traditional grammar.
Analysis of basic writing problems (grammatical and punctuation errors, and syntactic immaturity) in the writing of secondary students and the development of remediation materials and strategies.

ENGL 468. HISTORY OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201; ENGL 360 is recommended.
Origins and development of the English language from prehistoric times to the present.

ENGL 469. LITERATURE OF THE PNW. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: CRWR 469.
Notes: this course can be substituted for ENGL 439.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 343 or ENGL 344.
This course is a survey of Northwestern literature from 1800 to the present time, including representative exploration journals as well as more recent works by such writers as Richard Hugo, James Welch, Carolyn Kizer and Ursula LeGuin. Addresses questions of geography and regional culture.

ENGL 489. LGBT WRITERS: THEIR LIVES AND THEIR WORKS. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: WMST 489.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 270 or HUMN 101 or WMST 101 or HUMN 310 or WMST 310 or HUMN 410 or WMST 410.
This course examines the lives and works of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) writers as well as the historical and social contexts of their writing. Genres may include LGBT fiction, nonfiction, auto-ethnography, letters, diaries, film, critical accounts of authors’ work, social networks and other artifacts. The readings focus on the lived experiences of the writers and their characters while 1. identifying “relevant gaps” within the traditional literary canon, 2. questioning “existing modes;” 3. examining “connections among societal structures such as gender, race, class, age, and sexuality that contribute to (LGBT) oppression” and 4. connecting theory to practice.

ENGL 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
See your major department adviser for the appropriate section number.

ENGL 493. TEACHING LITERATURE TO ADOLESCENTS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: English majors must have grades ≥2.5 in ENGL 201, ENGL 270 and ENGL 271 or ENGL 273; non-majors must have permission of the instructor.
The course involves the study and analysis of adolescent literature and of methods for teaching literature to various grade levels. It is designed primarily for those who will be teaching and dealing with adolescent responses to literature.

ENGL 495. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
A minimum of 20 hours work per week as a student-intern in a cooperating business, industry or agency. Students may earn from 5–15 credits.

ENGL 496. TUTORING INTERNSHIP. 1-3 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.

ENGL 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

ENGL 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Three of the five English survey courses. Two of ENGL 340, ENGL 341, ENGL 342 and either ENGL 343 or ENGL 344.
Seminar.

ENGL 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Independent study under faculty direction, adapted to individual needs of the students.

ENGL 503. INFORMATION DESIGN. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
A study of the convergence of the visual and the verbal in professional communication, examining the variable expressive power of text and graphics both individually and in conjunction. Particular attention will be paid to the crafting of information for the World Wide Web. Students will study theories of information design and then apply them in individual and collaborative projects.

ENGL 504. INSTRUCTIONS AND PROCEDURES. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
As part of this course, students complete all the course work for TCOM 404. In TCOM 404, students will learn the art and practice of how to write, design, test and deliver instructions and procedures. In addition to the requirements for TCOM 404, graduate students completing ENGL 504 will study theoretical concepts related to instructions and procedures. Concepts may include interactivity, designing user experience, the role of new media and the relationship of technology and society.

ENGL 505. USABILITY. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be stacked with TCOM 405.
Usability is a metric for which we gauge the effectiveness of our technical communication. We may often describe a product as “usable” or not “user-friendly.” These terms indicate whether the product is or is not easy to navigate, use or comprehend. This course emphasizes user research and usability evaluation to test and revise technical products and artifacts so users can complete tasks efficiently and successfully. In this class, students will research the needs of representative users (including their environmental limitations and the tasks they need to complete), develop a usability test plan, conduct usability evaluations, and analyze, report and present this research in a way that assists writers/producers to create new, more usable iterations of their technical communication products.

ENGL 507. PROPOSAL WRITING. 5 Credits.

Investigation of funding sources, use of government documents for research, and evaluation of submitted proposals are among the areas covered. Emphasis is on clear, concise writing of individualized student projects.

ENGL 509. EDITING IN TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 459.
This course develops the principles and practices of technical editing. Students will learn how to copy, edit and proofread a variety of technical and professional documents, using standard symbols and conventions. Students will also learn to use style sheets to track emendations, and they will gain an understanding of the responsibilities of an editor to make texts effective and usable. The course is taught in conjunction with TCOM 409, and graduate students are expected to complete additional work beyond that required for the undergraduate course.

ENGL 511. COMPOSITION PEDAGOGIES: THEORIES AND PRACTICES. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
In this course emphasis is placed on the students’ own reading and writing processes as they summarize, analyze and synthesize composition theories and practices. First-year teaching assistants and first-year alternate teaching assistants are required to enroll in the course winter quarter.

ENGL 520. SEMINAR IN RESEARCH METHODS AND DESIGN. 5 Credits.

This course examines a range of research methods needed to write a thesis or research project. Students will learn how to design and conduct research related to their discipline. The course includes an introduction to creating literature reviews, conducting peer reviews, and citing references. Students will also learn how to evaluate sources, using databases to access print and online journals. Disciplinary focus of seminar will vary. Students must select a seminar appropriate to their emphasis.

ENGL 524. CONTENT MANAGEMENT. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 504.
In this course, students will learn the principles and practices of content management. They will learn associated technologies as well as how to write, design, and integrate content to fulfill organizational goals and how to communicate consistent information through multiple formats, delivery channels and devices.

ENGL 536. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN LITERATURE I: MAJOR LITERARY FIGURES. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
This graduate seminar will focus on the work of major figures from British, American, or world literature, considering their biography, the scope and development of their achievement, and the stature of their principal works. May be taken more than once; subject matter described by the added wording in the title.

ENGL 537. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN LITERATURE II: GENRE STUDIES. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated.
Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
This graduate seminar, through extensive reading and writing as well as student presentations, focuses on a genre or genres in British, American, and/or World literature. Genres studied may include, but are not limited to, nonfiction, prose, poetry, film, drama and electronic media. The choice of genres will vary with the instructor.

ENGL 538. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN LITERATURE III: LITERARY ERAS. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated.
Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
This graduate seminar, through extensive reading and writing as well as student presentations, focuses on a specific era in literary history. The selection of literary era will vary with the instructor.

ENGL 539. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN LITERATURE IV: SPECIAL TOPICS. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated.
Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
This graduate seminar course, through extensive reading and writing as well as student presentations, focuses on a thematic issue in British, American, or World literature. The course will explore the continuity of ideas across literary periods and cultures. The choice of topics will vary with the instructor.

ENGL 555. CONTEMP COMPOSITION THEORY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 511 or ENGL 408.
This course will provide students with the historical frameworks for understanding composition theory, acquaint them with major theories and theorists, and enable them to draw from contemporary theory for scholarship and pedagogy.

ENGL 560. APPLIED LINGUISTICS. 5 Credits.

Notes: Students do not need to take ENGL 360 or ENGL 459, but such courses provide a good beginning point for ENGL 560 and are recommended. It is also recommended that students take ENGL 560 prior to registering for ENGL 580.
Foundational linguistics needed for those teaching or planning to teach English to speakers of other languages in the U.S. and abroad. Content includes basic syntax, phonology, semantics, morphology and pragmatics. Through contrastive analysis, students will demonstrate an understanding of how to apply linguistic theory to create materials and develop approaches to teach sentence structure, pronunciation, word meanings, word parts and speech acts.

ENGL 564. PEDAGOGICAL GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION. 5 Credits.

This course includes analysis of grammar, structure, and usage of American English and varieties of World Englishes with a focus on error recognition, analysis, and correction within the context of learners’ writing. This is a writing-intensive course for English teachers who must demonstrate mastery of written English, edit their own writing, and develop teaching materials for a variety of levels and settings. Issues of writers’ voice, heritage, region, first language, dialect, and identity are addressed.

ENGL 568. TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION: PRACTICE, THEORY AND PEDAGOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
This course introduces students to major theories and practices influencing the teaching of technical communication. Students will investigates how professional and pedagogical practices both inform theory and are shaped by it. Students review components of standard curriculum and research theories, genres and practices of technical communication to develop course materials. In addition, students practice problem-based learning and pedagogy.

ENGL 570. SEMINAR IN TEACHING LITERATURE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
This course gives students in the Literature program emphasis practical as well as theoretical preparation for teaching literature. Students meet with the instructor once a week and also attend ENGL 270 or ENGL 271. In the lower-division class, students at first observe and then make presentations and then take over some of the teaching. The weekly meetings involve discussion of assigned pedagogy readings and discussion of experiences in class.

ENGL 571. ADVANCED LITERARY THEORY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
A study of major approaches in 20th century literary criticism and theory with emphasis on developments since the 1950s. Previous work in this area will be assumed.

ENGL 573. HISTORY OF RHETORIC. 5 Credits.

A survey of major rhetorical traditions from classical times to the present. Major emphasis will be placed on the decline of invention in classical rhetoric and the rise of new rhetorical systems in the 18th and 20th centuries.

ENGL 575. CONTEMPORARY RHETORICAL THEORIES. 5 Credits.

In-depth survey of contemporary rhetorical theories - e.g., developmental rhetoric, process rhetoric, new romantic rhetoric, conceptual rhetoric, neo-classical rhetoric.

ENGL 580. SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION. 5 Credits.

Notes: completion of ENGL 560 is recommended.
Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
This course includes the study of theories of language acquisition and development of reading, writing, speaking and listening in a foreign/second language. First language acquisition will also be discussed briefly.

ENGL 581. SECOND LANGUAGE CURRICULUM DESIGN AND ASSESSMENT. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: this is a research-based course, which has no official prerequisite, though some ESL background is highly recommended.
A course directed at prospective ESL teachers and curriculum designers which presents and reviews various current forms of curriculum at all levels (K-13) with an emphasis on secondary and post-secondary, both collegiate and non-collegiate settings.

ENGL 582. MODERN LANGUAGE METHODOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Examines current theories, methods, and research in teaching English and other languages as foreign or second languages. Students may do research in languages other than English. Some foreign language experience would be very helpful, though not necessary.

ENGL 583. WORLD ENGLISHES: THE HISTORY AND FUTURE OF ENGLISH. 5 Credits.

The course is designed (1) to introduce pre-service and in-service language teachers to varieties of World Englishes used across cultures and (2) to increase awareness of some of the linguistic and socially relevant contexts and functions that have given rise to World Englishes. Learners identify and analyze communication among users of different Englishes with an emphasis on sociolinguistic aspects of English in the globalized world. Course materials and projects aim to increase students’ understanding of historical, cultural, social and ideational functions of World Englishes.

ENGL 590. PORTFOLIO CAPSTONE. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: completion of all CORE courses: ENGL 511, ENGL 520, ENGL 564, ENGL 573 or ENGL 575.
In this course, students will prepare either a professional, academic or teaching portfolio in both Web and PDF form. The presentation and evaluation of the portfolio serves as the program’s comprehensive examination, and successful completion and a satisfactory evaluation of the portfolio is an alternative to a thesis (ENGL 600) or professional project (ENGL 601). The portfolio will be prepared during the course, but students are encouraged to save academic and professional artifacts for the portfolio throughout their program tenure.

ENGL 595. PRACTICUM IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
The development, reinforcement, integration, and application of content gained in previous and concurrent graduate courses. This course is intended for students employed as teachers in the elementary or secondary classroom.

ENGL 596. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

ENGL 597. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: only one workshop course for up to 3 credits may be used to fulfill graduate degree requirements.

ENGL 598. SEMINAR IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 5-10 Credits.

Cross-listed: may be cross-listed CRWR 598.
This course deals with specialized aspects of language and literature. A student may take the seminar several times. The exact content of the course will be indicated in the title to be entered on his or her permanent record.

ENGL 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

ENGL 600. THESIS. 1-12 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Master of Arts in English candidacy; permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Independent research study under the direction of a graduate advisory committee.

ENGL 601. PROFESSIONAL ESSAY. 1-12 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
A formally considered summation and emphasis drawn from the principal course work and professional context of the candidate's program.

ENGL 694. PRACTICUM: TEACHING FIRST-YEAR COMPOSITION. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: current English teaching assistantship or alternate English teaching assistantship or permission of the instructor.
Training in the strategies and practices of teaching first-year composition. Emphasis is on developing curricular and assessment materials for use in teaching ENGL 101 at Eastern Washington University. First-year teaching assistants and first-year alternate teaching assistants are required to enroll in the course fall quarter.

ENGL 695A. INTERNSHIP: TEACHING COMPOSITION. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the English Composition Program director, English Department chair, and college dean.
An internship or externship in the teaching of pre-college, college or university composition. The mentor for the internship or externship must be a lecturer or professor who is the instructor-of-record for a pre-college, college or university composition course. A graduate-student teaching assistant cannot mentor another student’s internship or externship. The student and the English Composition Program director will work together to determine the location of and the number of credits for the internship or externship.

ENGL 695B. INTERNSHIP: TEACHING LITERATURE. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair, and college dean.
An internship or externship in the teaching literature. The mentor for the internship or externship must be a lecturer or professor who is the instructor-of-record for a literature course. A graduate-student teaching assistant cannot mentor another student’s internship or externship. The student and the instructor will work together to determine the location of and the number of credits for the internship or externship.

ENGL 695C. INTERNSHIP: TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair, and college dean.
An internship or externship in the teaching English as a Second Language. The mentor for the internship or externship must be a lecturer or professor who is the instructor-of-record for a teaching English as a Second Language course. A graduate-student teaching assistant cannot mentor another student’s internship or externship. The student and the instructor will work together to determine the location of and the number of credits for the internship or externship.

ENGL 695D. INTERNSHIP: PROFESSIONAL WRITING. 1-10 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair, and college dean.
Intended for graduate students assigned to writing projects in business, government or industry; may be as a campus resident or on location.

ENGL 695E. INTERNSHIP: WRITER'S CENTER. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: Limited spots available quarterly. Visit to center prior to registration is recommended.
Pre-requisites: interview with the director, permission of the Writers' Center director, the English Department chair and the college dean.
Allows interns to assimilate into the workplace of the Writers’ Center. Students will establish a regular working schedule and be initiated into current center practice.

ENGL 697. PRACTICUM: TEACHING ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Intended for graduate students assigned to writing projects in business, government, or industry; may be as a campus resident or on location.

ENGL 698. PRACTICUM: JOB MARKET. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: current English teaching assistantship or alternate English teaching assistantship or permission of the instructor.
A professional development course in the field of Rhetoric and Composition. Prepares current and future teachers of composition for the two-year and four-year job market. Emphasis is on developing curriculum vitae, application letters, teaching philosophies and teaching demonstration materials. First-year teaching assistants and alternate teaching assistants are required to enroll in the course spring quarter.


Technical Communication Courses


TCOM 205. INTRODUCTION TO TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
In this introduction to technical communication, students will learn the basic principles of effectively structuring information for a variety of purposes and audiences, using an applicable document type. Students will solve various communication problems individually and they will be required to work in teams to complete a research or service learning project.

TCOM 300. WRITING FOR THE PROFESSIONS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
TCOM 300 focuses on analyzing and creating effective communication practices for professional writing. Communication projects such as proposing new research projects, creating and integrating data graphics into professional reports, and reporting data to recommend problem-based solutions through reports and presentations will be emphasized in this course.

TCOM 305. PRINT LAYOUT AND CONTENT DESIGN. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: JRNM 305.
This course emphasizes content-driven design and layout, and it focuses on the basic principles and skills needed in journalism and technical communication when writing and publishing content. In this course, students will develop and practice the content design and layout skills necessary to succeed in a variety of professional settings.

TCOM 309. GRAMMAR FOR PROFESSIONAL WRITERS. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: ENGL 309, JRNM 309.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Many professionals continue to struggle with grammar and usage rules throughout their careers. In this course, students will refresh and improve their knowledge of English grammar, style and usage rules. They will develop confidence in using correct punctuation, capitalization and verb forms, and learn how to create and employ different types of sentence structures, becoming proficient at writing clear, correct sentences to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences.

TCOM 404. INSTRUCTIONS AND PROCEDURES. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: TCOM 205.
In our technologically rich world, instructions and procedures pervade our professional lives. In this course, students will learn the art and practice of how to write, design, test and deliver instructions and procedures. Skills learned in this course are highly desired in a variety of settings including government, industry, corporate and non-profit agencies.

TCOM 405. USABILITY. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be stacked with ENGL 505.
Usability is a metric for which we gauge the effectiveness of our technical communication. We may often describe a product as “usable” or not “user-friendly.” These terms indicate whether the product is or is not easy to navigate, use or comprehend. This course emphasizes user research and usability evaluation to test and revise technical products and artifacts so users can complete tasks efficiently and successfully. In this class, students will research the needs of representative users (including their environmental limitations and the tasks they need to complete), develop a usability test plan, conduct usability evaluations, and analyze, report, and present this research in a way that assists writers/producers to create new, more usable iterations of their technical communication products.

TCOM 407. PROPOSAL WRITING. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Investigation of funding sources, use of government documents for research and evaluation of submitted proposals are among areas covered. Emphasis is on clear, concise writing of individualized student projects.

TCOM 409. EDITING IN TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 459.
This course develops the principles and practices of technical editing. Students will learn how to copy, edit and proofread a variety of technical and professional documents, using standard symbols and conventions. Students will also learn to use style sheets to track emendations and they will gain an understanding of the responsibilities of an editor to make texts effective and usable.

TCOM 424. CONTENT MANAGEMENT. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: TCOM 404.
In this course, students will learn the principles and practices of content management. They will learn associated technologies as well as how to write, design and integrate content to fulfill organizational goals and how to communicate consistent information through multiple formats, delivery channels, and devices.

TCOM 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE: ISSUES IN TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.

TCOM 495. TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated.
Pre-requisites: TCOM 404, TCOM 407 and TCOM 409; permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
A minimum of 20 hours work per week as a student-intern in technical communication for a cooperating business, industry or agency. Students may earn from 5–15 credits.