Psychology Courses


Psychology Courses


PSYC 100. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: GECR for social sciences, list 2, anthropology, geography, psychology and sociology.
A general introduction to psychology as the scientific study of behavior and thought; an overview of the areas of psychology and their development; methods in psychology; biological, sensory and developmental influences on behavior; physiological and cognitive components of behavior; theories of learning; a survey of theories of normal and abnormal behavior; principles of psychotherapy; personality theory and testing; and social influences.

PSYC 190. RISKY BEHAVIOR. 2 Credits.

The course will explore, discuss and teach skills that are alternatives for managing risky behavior. Topics that will be covered include decision-making, sexually transmitted infections, sexual assault, alcohol and other drug use, and ways of combating risky behavior including birth control and abstinence, assertiveness and self-management techniques.

PSYC 195. INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

PSYC 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

PSYC 197. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

PSYC 201. LIFE-SPAN DEVELOPMENT. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: GECR for social sciences, list 2, anthropology, geography, psychology and sociology.
A broad overview of human development from birth to death. Topics covered include the biological, cognitive, learning, cultural and socio-emotional influences on development. Designed for the non-major.

PSYC 295. INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Individualized learning and career development through an off-campus internship. An internship agreement-learning contract form is required and can be picked up prior to registration, along with information about placements and procedures from the Career Services Internship office. Two sections are available, one for psychology majors, one for non-psychology majors.

PSYC 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

PSYC 297. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

PSYC 298. SEMINAR. 1-6 Credits.

PSYC 299. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-6 Credits.

PSYC 301. THEORIES OF PERSONALITY. 5 Credits.

An objective and comprehensive study of the major theories of personality.

PSYC 302. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Explores and evaluates research and theoretical concepts relating to deviant and abnormal behavior.

PSYC 303. FOUNDATION OF PSYCHOTHERAPY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 301 and PSYC 302.
Survey of theories of psychotherapy dealing with psychopathology. Particular attention is given to effectiveness of theory construction. Evaluates the role of intervening variables and logical consistency.

PSYC 304. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 201 recommended.
Principles of learning and development as applied to improvements in classroom instruction.

PSYC 305. CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201; math proficiency recommended.
Mental, physical, social and emotional development from infancy through adolescence.

PSYC 306. ADULT DEVELOPMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201; math proficiency recommended.
Covers the processes, evidence, theories and socio-cultural influences on adults.

PSYC 307. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201; math proficiency recommended.
A psychological approach to human behavior, growth and change.

PSYC 309. SCIENTIFIC PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MTHD 104.
The study of the methodology and attitudes of psychology irrespective of any special area. Considers techniques for evaluating information, discovering invalid interpretations, and uncovering alternative explanations. These are illustrated by reading research articles and classroom discussion of the articles and of popular beliefs.

PSYC 313. RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CSBS 320, ENGL 201 and PSYC 309.
This course is an introduction to typical research methods used in psychology. Students complete several research projects reflecting these various methods.

PSYC 314. TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CSBS 320.
This course will provide students with a current analysis of the most widely used psychological tests in schools, professional training programs, business, industry, the military, and clinical settings. Students will learn how psychological tests are constructed, how they are used, and how an understanding of them can make a difference in their careers and everyday lives. Issues of fairness, bias, and social consequences for use and interpretation with diverse populations will be addressed.

PSYC 315. PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN RELATIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201; math proficiency recommended.
Helps develop your understanding and skill in interpersonal relationships needed for professional consultation and/or counseling.

PSYC 316. HUMAN MEMORY AND COGNITION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior level standing or permission of the instructor.
Examination of the principles and theories of human memory and selected topics in cognitive psychology.

PSYC 317. HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 309.
An examination of the psychological influences on health including both wellness and illness; a focus on the etiology and correlates of health and illness as well as the prevention and treatment of illness. Exploring the psychological dynamics at work in utilization of the health care system and patient-practitioner interactions. Specific coverage of the illness process in pain, lung disease, stress, chronic illness, and AIDS.

PSYC 318. COMPUTERIZATION RESEARCH TECHNIQUES IN PSYCHOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CSBS 320 and PSYC 309.
Introduces the use of computers in psychological research through software that inexperienced users can program by filling out forms. Hands-on experience on the system will be acquired during the first 2-3 weeks. Recent experimental findings in a number of research areas will be introduced. Working individually or in small groups, students will select a problem for study and develop a method of investigation using the software system.

PSYC 320. DEVELOPMENTAL THEORIES AND APPLICATIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 305, PSYC 315 or permission of the instructor.
Covers principles and concepts of major theories of human development, evaluation of theories, appreciation of alternative views of development and alternative strategies for enhancing development.

PSYC 323. DRUGS AND BEHAVIOR. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 100 recommended.
An introduction to the action, use, and abuse of psychotropic agents from analgesics to hallucinogens. Special attention given to drug abuse.

PSYC 324. CONDITIONING AND LEARNING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing.
A study of human learning emphasizing conditions for acquisition, learning structures, learning sets, levels of learning and measurement.

PSYC 325. COGNITIVE AND BEHAVIOR CHANGE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 100.
This course is designed to examine various cognitive and behavioral change procedures in terms of their theoretical basis and applied strategies. Operant, respondent, social learning, and cognitive theories and their applications will be studied. Students will be required to engage in a self-change project throughout the quarter in order to better understand the principles of cognitive and behavioral change.

PSYC 331. PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN. 4 Credits.

Cross-listed: WMST 331.
Pre-requisites: completion of ENGL 201 or equivalent.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
The psychology of women in terms of their bodies, socialization, personality, affiliation and achievement motivations, abnormal behavior patterns, therapy and personal growth needs.

PSYC 338. DISCOVERING WOMEN IN SCIENCE. 1 Credit.

Cross-listed: BIOL 338, CHEM 338, GEOL 338, HIST 338, PHYS 338, WMST 338.
The course uses several scientific themes to rediscover from the past and find in contemporary research the women who have made significant contributions to science.

PSYC 340. EMOTION AND EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 100 or equivalent.
This course explores the psychology of emotion and how emotion impacts behavior and experience. This class investigates what emotion is, how it can be measured, basic theories of emotion, and what factors contribute to the different emotional states. Issues related to emotional intelligence will also be explored, with particular emphasis on emotion identification, understanding, and regulation.

PSYC 344. INTRODUCTION TO THE HELPING PROFESSIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: declared Applied Developmental Psychology major, PSYC 307, PSYC 315, PSYC 320, or permission of instructor.
This course provides students with an introduction to the helping professions, their specializations, history and ethics issues. Content includes communication skills, blocks to personal effectiveness and sequential stage model of problem solving for helpers.

PSYC 359. HUMAN SEXUALITY. 5 Credits.

Psychological, biological, and cultural perspectives of human sexual behavior. The basis for successful functioning; frequency and significance of various types of sexual behavior; anatomy and physiology of reproduction; sexual inadequacy and deviations.

PSYC 381. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 309 recommended.
Individual behavior as socially determined: interpersonal attraction, aggressiveness, attitude formation, group dynamics, conformity, and leadership.

PSYC 395. INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the department internship director and the department chair and the university Career Services Internship office.
Individualized learning and career development through an off-campus internship. An internship agreement-learning contract form is required and can be picked up prior to registration, along with information about placements and procedures from the Career Services Internship office. Two sections are available, one for psychology majors, one for non-psychology majors.

PSYC 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

PSYC 397. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 2 Credits.

PSYC 398. SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: offered fall/winter/spring.

PSYC 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor and the department chair.

PSYC 402. BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 305, PSYC 324 or permission of the instructor.
Behavior modification provides an in-depth exposure to the principles, concepts and procedures from both behavioral and cognitive theories as applied to individuals, couples and families, organizational groups and community settings.

PSYC 404. PSYCHOLOGY OF THE GIFTED/TALENTED CHILD. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 304 or permission of the instructor.
Giftedness and talent from a psychological perspective. Seminar format covers issues of development, measurement, theories, prediction and special needs.

PSYC 417. PEDIATRIC AND ADOLESCENT HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 402 or permission of the instructor.
An examination of health factors affecting developmental outcomes. There will be an emphasis on the health aspects of development and how to maintain and improve health-related behaviors in children and adolescents.

PSYC 420. BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF BEHAVIOR. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 309.
Organic foundations of behavior.

PSYC 421. CARE AND CUSTODY OF FEMALE OFFENDERS. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: WMST 421.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
This course explores the care and custody of female offenders in the criminal justice system, with particular focus on psychological factors and mental health treatment.

PSYC 425. PSYCHOLOGY AND THE LEGAL SYSTEM. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 100 or permission of the instructor.
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the field of forensic psychology. The course provides an overview of the role of mental health professionals in correctional settings and in conducting forensic evaluations.

PSYC 427. INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 100 and junior standing or permission of instructor.
This course explores how social scientists think about, study, research and treat intimate relationships. Issues of communication, gender, sexual orientation, culture are explored within the context of intimate relationships.

PSYC 430. HUMAN PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CSBS 320.
An overview of the following topics: automatic nervous system, biofeedback, clinical applications, emotion, instrumentation, measurement, pain, psychosomatic processes, sleep, social aspects of physiological processes and stress. Laboratory includes: biofeedback, blood flow, ECG, EDR, EEG, EMG, and respiration. Course is especially suited for students of the health sciences.

PSYC 431. STRESS AND COPING. 3 Credits.

Examines the psychological, physiological, and health consequences resulting from selected psychological and environmental stressors. Psychological stressors include personality type, social disorganization, competition, and conflict. Environmental stressors include cold, heat, hypo- and hyperbaric pressures, and exercise. Examines coping responses such as biofeedback, progressive relaxation, autogenic training, and physiological adaptation.

PSYC 433. COMPASSION FOCUSED THERAPY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 100, PSYC 302 preferred.
This course presents students with the theoretical background and approach to psychotherapy taken in Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT). CFT is based in evolutionary psychology, affective neuroscience, cognitive-behavior therapy and centuries-old mindfulness and compassion practices. Students learn to understand emotional difficulties and work with them.

PSYC 440. HAPPINESS AND POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing.
Happiness has been a neglected topic in psychology, and yet is an important human pursuit. This class investigates what happiness is, how it can be assessed, and what factors facilitate happiness. Other human virtues important to well-being such as gratitude, wisdom, courage, humanity, justice, temperance, and transcendence are explored.

PSYC 450. TRAUMA: THEORY, ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: recommend PSYC 302.
This class explores traumatic experience in terms of substance, impact, and reactions, including the assessment and treatment of trauma-related psychopathology.

PSYC 452. SOCIAL INFLUENCE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of instructor.
This course focuses on topics pertaining to social influence, including persuasion, compliance, and obedience. The course covers both intentional and unintentional forms of influence from a psychological perspective.

PSYC 456. TEACHING AND SKILLS TRAINING IN THE MANAGEMENT OF RISKY BEHAVIOR. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 190.
The course provides guided experiences in developing skills to be a peer-facilitator for PSYC 190. Both knowledge and teaching skills will be explicitly taught and practiced. Such knowledge and skills are necessary in facilitating PSYC 190.

PSYC 461. INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Notes: Cluster B requirements of Psychology BA.
Pre-requisites: junior level standing or higher or instructor permission.
Students apply psychological principles and methods to the workplace, including employee selection, motivation, performance and behavior; the structure and function of occupational positions and activities; and the nature, processes and development of organizations.

PSYC 470. CHILDHOOD PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND TREATMENT. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing.
This course focuses on psychopathological disorders of childhood and adolesence, critically attending to normal and abnormal developmental sequences. Attention is given to the diagnosis and implications of such disorders and to clinical intervention methods.

PSYC 474. CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 100.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
This course investigates the literature and methods involved in the psychological study of people from different cultures – both subcultures within the US and peoples from around the world. It also addresses the question of universality of psychological phenomenon.

PSYC 476. CHILD AND FAMILY GUIDANCE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 305, PSYC 324 or permission of the instructor.
The interaction between parents and children, the development and socialization of the child within the family and the relationship of the family to the school and community from a developmental perspective. Approaches to child rearing, management, discipline and communication for parents, teachers and other child care personnel are presented. Also examines family social support functions and considers multicultural issues in child socialization and guidance. Appropriate for present and future parents, teachers and child care personnel.

PSYC 481. PREJUDICE AND STEREOTYPING. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 381 or instructor permission.
The course Prejudice and Stereotyping is a five credit discussion course that examines the social psychological underpinnings of prejudice, stereotyping and discrimination. The course topics will address specific types of prejudice such as sexism and racism, individual differences and cognitive states that can lead to prejudice, the effect of prejudice on its targets and reducing prejudice.

PSYC 483. GROUP DYNAMICS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: declared Applied Developmental Psychology major, PSYC 307, PSYC 315, PSYC 320 or permission of the instructor.
Introduces the principles formed through the scientific study of small-group dynamics and considers the issues and problems arising in the study of groups.

PSYC 484. CHILD ABUSE: RECOGNITION AND INTERVENTION STRATEGIES. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on recognition of abuse in children and specific intervention strategies for their social/emotional needs. Physical, emotional and sexual abuse will be addressed along with factors of recognition for each of these areas of abuse. Specific common indicators of abuse will be looked at as it relates to the impact on the social, emotional, cognitive and behavioral realm of children.

PSYC 485. ADD/ADHD IN THE SCHOOLS. 3 Credits.

This course will provide the skills needed to help minimize the everyday struggles encountered while working with difficult behaviors. Areas to be addressed include characteristics of AD/HD, common treatment approaches, myths about AD/HD and matching interventions to behaviors.

PSYC 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE: THE TRADITION OF PSYCHOLOGY. 6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CSBS 320, PSYC 309 and PSYC 313.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
This course fulfills the university capstone requirement and may also be used as an elective within the department’s major. The course consists of three components: (a) the history of psychology, (b) a collaborative project and (c) portfolio preparation.

PSYC 490A. SENIOR CAPSTONE: DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY SENIOR SEMINAR. 4 Credits.

Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
The course is designed to help students make the transition from the academic world to the world of work and civic life or to a higher level of academic achievement. The primary goal for the student’s successful transition will be accomplished via the process of application. The course is designed also as an end-of-program assessment tool. The basic assumption is that the developmental coursework has equipped the students with the knowledge of developmental theories, counseling strategies, research methods, and assessment procedures. This capstone will test the student’s ability to apply the course work to real-world situations. The course objectives are organized to facilitate the process of application.

PSYC 490B. SENIOR CAPSTONE: MINDS AND VINES: PSYCHOLOGY OF WINE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing; 21 years of age and declared major.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
The goal is for students to integrate their knowledge and hone their psychological problem-solving skills in diverse areas. The integration will include (a) the history and culture of wine, (b) sensory discrimination and marketing of wine, (c) the positive and negative impact of wine on biological and psychological health and (d) the treatment of the latter effects.

PSYC 491. SENIOR THESIS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: invitation of the instructor/advisor.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement (replaces ITGS 400 as a senior capstone experience).
Directed research resulting in a formal write-up. Limited to those students for whom research experience will be helpful in obtaining entrance to graduate school.

PSYC 492. FIELD STUDY IN CHILD ISSUES AND PROBLEMS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 305, PSYC 324, some senior major courses and faculty advisement.
This course introduces students to professional human service settings through shadowing a professional in the community. Students are expected to enroll in this course over two consecutive quarters.

PSYC 493. FIELD STUDY IN ADOLESCENT ISSUES AND PROBLEMS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 305, 324 some senior, major courses and faculty advisement.
This course introduces students to professional human service settings through shadowing a professional in the community. Students are expected to enroll in this course over two consecutive quarters.

PSYC 494. FIELD STUDY IN ADULT ISSUES AND PROBLEMS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 305, PSYC 324 some senior major courses and faculty advisement.
This course introduces students to professional human service settings through shadowing a professional in the community. Students are expected to enroll in this course over two consecutive quarters.

PSYC 495. INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Individualized learning and career development through an off-campus internship. An internship agreement-learning contract form is required and can be picked up prior to registration, along with information about placements and procedures from the Career Services Internship Office. Two sections are available, one for psychology majors and one for non-psychology majors.

PSYC 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

PSYC 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

PSYC 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

PSYC 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor and the department chair.

PSYC 503. PROSEMINAR: SCIENTIFIC METHODS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission into psychology MS program or school psychology program or graduate standing and instructor permission.
Introduction to logic of scientific method, decision making, hypothesis testing, measurement, and model and theory construction.

PSYC 504. PROSEMINAR: LEARNING AND BEHAVIOR THERAPY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
An intensive survey of important learning phenomena as they relate to theoretical issues and controversies. Consideration of methodological problems.

PSYC 505. APPLIED LEARNING THEORY AND BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION. 4 Credits.

Applied learning theory, methodology, and research paradigms will be defined and their inter-theory, inter-subject, inter-problem-solving relevance demonstrated.

PSYC 506. COUNSELING DEVELOPMENT AND TRANSITION ACROSS THE LIFESPAN. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Admission to the graduate counseling program: mental health or school counseling emphasis or permission of the instructor.
Major theories of human development, the nature and needs of individuals at all developmental levels and the counseling implications associated with developmental processes are covered.

PSYC 507. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT: RESEARCH, THEORIES AND APPLICATIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing in psychology. If from a related area, instructor permission is required.
An examination of the field of human development and the contribution of those findings to professional practice. The philosophical and empirical basis for the theories explaining human development will be explored. The course will focus on the criteria that determine the adequacy of a theory and the applications generated by particular theories. Application and interpretation of research according to contemporary, empirically-based theories, and emerging issues and approaches will be key components of the course.

PSYC 508. PROFESSIONAL ISSUES. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission into psychology MS program.
Professional Issues presents legal, ethical and moral aspects of the professional practice of psychology. Topics will include professional credentialing, registration and licensing; ethical principles of psychologists; confidentiality; disclosure to clients, duty to protect and warn; suidice risk assessment and other ethical dilemmas. Students will recieve state required AIDS/HIV training.

PSYC 509. CLASSROOM MANAGMENT FOR THE SCHOOL COUNSELOR. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate counseling program, school counseling emphasis.
This course will provide an understanding of the role of the counselor in managing classroom behavior, including how to establish positive counselor-student relationships and peer relationships that help meet students’ basic psychological needs while building a community of support within the classroom.

PSYC 510. PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY I. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate program in school psychology.
This course is the first in the series of Professional School Psychology and focuses on the history and principles of school psychology, the professional role of the school psychologist and current trends in education. The course includes various pre-practicum observations in applied settings.

PSYC 511. PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY II. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate program in school psychology.
This course focuses on the impact of legal issues on the role and functions of school psychologists in Washington.

PSYC 512. PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY III. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 510, PSYC 511.
This course is the third in the series of professional school psychology and focuses on professional practice and ethical issues in the field. Best practices in school psychology and considerations of NASP, AERA and APA ethical guidelines and codes of conduct will be covered. The course includes pre-practicum observations in applied settings.

PSYC 513. ADVANCED CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT. 4 Credits.

Notes: EdS School Psychology Degree requirement.
The course relies on several perspectives concerning human development and intervention/prevention—ecological theories of development, developmental psychology, developmental psychopathology and risk/resilience research—as theoretical lenses on various interventions.

PSYC 514. RESEARCH AND STATISTICS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: accepted to PSYC graduate program.
In this course you will learn the basic principles of research methods (both group and small n) and statistics used in school psychology. Our focus will be learning to evaluate existing research and applying the principles of scientific methodology to the field.

PSYC 515. ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 4 Credits.

The relevance of psychological theory to educational practice as applied to teaching, learning, development, and evaluation.

PSYC 516. HUMAN MEMORY AND COGNITION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
Examination of the principles and theories of human memory and selected topics in cognitive psychology.

PSYC 517. HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
An examination of the psychological influences on health including both wellness and illness; a focus on the etiology and correlates of health and illness as well as the prevention and treatment of illness. Exploring the psychological dynamics at work in utilization of the health care system and patient-practitioner interactions. Specific coverage of the illness process in pain, heart disease, cancer, stress, and chronic illnesses.

PSYC 518. COMPUTERIZED RESEARCH TECHNIQUES IN PSYCHOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CPLA or equivalent.
This class is intended to provide graduate students in psychology and allied disciplines with an efficient method of presenting stimuli and gathering data using personal computers. The class introduces the MEL programming system by which users can prepare programs by filling out forms and supplementing the forms with MEL code. Demonstrations and class exercises will apply the programming techniques to carry out common psychological tasks. Students will select a problem for individual study and develop a method of investigation using the software system.

PSYC 520. TACTICS PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of instructor.
A critical analysis of research methodologies in psychology. Emphasis is placed on developing student skills in asking and answering sound research questions.

PSYC 521. CARE AND CUSTODY OF FEMALE OFFENDERS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
This course explores the care and custody of female offenders in the criminal justice system, with particular focus on psychological factors and mental health treatment.

PSYC 522. ADVANCED STATISTICS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CSBS 320 or other inferential statistics class.
Statistical theory, interpretations, and procedures which are especially valuable to workers in education, psychology and related fields.

PSYC 523. MULTI-TIERED SYSTEMS OF SUPPORT. 4 Credits.

This course will assist students in understanding the link between assessment and intervention. School-wide Academic and Behavioral Assessment and Interventions, supplemental programs and intensive interventions will be addressed. Students will gain knowledge regarding early intervention, prevention and evidenced based academic and behavioral programs within Pre K-12 schools.

PSYC 525. PSYCHOLOGY AND THE LEGAL SYSTEM. 5 Credits.

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the field of forensic psychology. The coure provides an overview of the role of mental health professionals in correctional settings and in conducting forensic evaluations.

PSYC 526. ACADEMIC ASSESSMENT FOR SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: enrollment in school psychology program.
An in-depth review of the purposes and methods of academic assessment in school psychology practice. The course focuses on the administration of various academic assessments and interpretation of the scores obtained from the instruments for use in making data-based decisions. Special attention will be given to the applicability of assessments to diverse student populations.

PSYC 530. SCHOOL COUNSELOR PROCERT CULMINATING SEMINAR. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admitted to the School Counselor Professional Certificate Program.
Spring quarter. Candidates will complete the school year’s work on their professional growth plan that will culminate with a panel presentation and a completed portfolio. The presentation will highlight the school year’s work on Standard Six. The entire professional growth plan portfolio will also be evaluated.

PSYC 531. PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL GROUPS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate program in school psychology or permission of instructor.
This course examines the theory, assessment and application of different types of psychoeducational groups for children and adolescents in school and agency settings. In addition to didactic learning, students will be required to participate and lead a psychoeducational group.

PSYC 532. RESEARCH AND STATISTICS GROUP DESIGN. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: accepted to psychology graduate program.
In this course you will learn the basics of research design and analysis for the behavioral sciences. We will be covering concepts, applications techniques for designing and evaluating research studies for both field and laboratory research.

PSYC 533. INTERVENTION AND PROGRAM EVALUATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: accepted to psychology graduate program.
This course will assist candidates in evaluating educational interventions in two areas: single case design and program Evaluation. For single case design, we will cover the components, strengths, and limitations of single case design research. We will cover the various designs, ranging from a simple “B” Design to more complex single case designs. We will examine issues related to validity and reliability of single case research and connect this research methodology to your topics of interest. Candidates will leave this course with knowledge to design and carry out a case study, with an adequate (and hopefully more complex) research design. Beyond the focus on single case design, we will also cover the basics of program evaluation. Candidates will leave the course with an understanding of how to evaluate multi-tiered interventions/programs in schools. Finally, we will focus on writing and presenting research findings. Candidates will be writing and presenting a single case design proposal.

PSYC 534. HUMAN NEUROPSYCHOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to psychology MS program or school psychology program or instructor permission.
The relationships between physiological processes and behavior.

PSYC 535. INTRODUCTION TO MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate counseling program: mental health counseling emphasis.
An introduction to the profession of mental health counseling. The course will emphasize historical, philosophical, professional, ethical and public policy perspectives. The focus is on the role of the counselor with various clientele.

PSYC 537. ADVANCED PSYCHOPATHOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission into psychology MS program or graduate standing and instructor permission.
This course is designed to teach strategies in diagnosing mental disorders, and to evaluate the most current treatment modalities. Problems of cultural diversity and ethnic differences are explored.

PSYC 539. SEMINAR IN SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: may be graded Pass/No Credit.

PSYC 540. INTRODUCTION TO SCHOOL COUNSELING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate program: school counseling emphasis or permission of instructor.
The development of the school counseling profession; counseling functions within systems; the structure and management of school counseling programs. CACREP standards and PESB standards for School Counselors.

PSYC 542. CAREER COUNSELING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate counseling program: mental health or school counseling emphasis or permission of instructor.
Career development theory; educational and vocational information; career decision-making processes; components of school or community career programs.

PSYC 543. COUNSELING THEORIES AND SCHOOL BASED MENTAL HEALTH INTERVENTIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate program in school psychology.
This course provides an overview of theories of counseling and interventions for students with mental health concerns. The course covers the role of the school psychologist as counselor and how school psychologists facilitate a multi-tiered approach to mental health intervention.

PSYC 544. COUNSELING THEORY AND TECHNIQUES. 4 Credits.

An introduction to principles of counseling, and a survey of contemporary theories and techniques.

PSYC 545. APPRAISAL IN MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate program: mental health counseling emphasis or permission of instructor.
The administration, scoring and interpretation of standardized tests in the mental health counseling profession. Includes a focus on testing ethics, sources of testing bias and diversity issues in assessment, as well as the use of interview assessment/mental status exam and psychological testing for treatment planning.

PSYC 547. ASSESSMENT: SCHOOL COUNSELING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate program: school counseling emphasis or permission of instructor.
The use of assessment techniques in the school counseling setting, including standardized instruments, sand play and observation. Includes a focus on testing ethics, sources of testing bias, diversity issues, implications of high stakes testing and effective use of assessment in counseling outcomes.

PSYC 548. COUNSELING CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate program: mental health or school counseling emphasis or permission of instructor.
Counseling principles and techniques as applied to children and adolescents will be presented and analyzed.

PSYC 550. TRAUMA: THEORY, ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: undergraduate degree in psychology or related field.
This class explores traumatic experience in terms of substance, impact, and reactions, including the assessment and treatment of trauma-related psychopathology.

PSYC 551. FOUNDATION OF PSYCHOTHERAPY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission into psychology MS program with clinical emphasis or instructor permission.
Main types of psychological treatment with emphasis upon those which primarily rely on verbal exchanges between the counselee and the therapist. Practical application of techniques will be experienced.

PSYC 552. ESA PEER REVIEW: SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor.
This course is designed to fulfill the requirements specified in the Washington Certification Handbook and the Washington Administrative Code for Continuing Certification of School Psychologists. The major emphases of this course are on documenting the knowledge and skills of practicing school psychologists and providing a forum for peer review based on contemporary standards of practice. Required peer review course for continuing ESA certification.

PSYC 553. SOCIAL, EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL ASSESSMENT OF CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to a psychology graduate program.
Students learn assessment techniques to examine social, emotional and behavioral functioning in children and adolescents. A problem solving approach is utilized with training in reviewing, interviewing, observing, and testing children. Major tests considered and applied within this course include broad rating scales such as the Achenbach and BASC systems and narrow rating scales utilized to diagnose more specific disorders.

PSYC 554. COGNITIVE ASSESSMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to psychology MS program with clinical emphasis or school psychology program.
This course will provide in-depth training in cognitive assessment, including intelligence, memory, academic, and special abilities testing.

PSYC 555. CLINICAL PRACTICE IN COGNITIVE ASSESSMENT. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to psychology MS program with clinical emphasis.
Administration, scoring and writing of psychological reports; Stanford Binet, W.I.S.C. and W.A.I.S.

PSYC 556. PERSONALITY AND BEHAVIORAL ASSESSMENT. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to psychology MS program or school psychology program.
This course focuses on assessment techniques utilized to examine emotional and behavioral functioning in children and adolescents. A problem solving approach is utilized with training in reviewing, interviewing, observing, and testing children. Major tests considered and applied within this course include broad rating scales such as the Achenbach and BASC systems and narrow rating scales utilized to diagnose more specific disorders.

PSYC 558. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PRACTICUM. 1-8 Credits.

Notes: Graded Pass/Fail. Repeatable for credit.
Supervised experience of school psychology students in assessment, intervention, and consultation, as well as professional and ethical areas.

PSYC 559. COGNITIVE ASSESSMENT LAB. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: must be in school psychology program and permission of the instructor.
School Psychology graduate students take this course concurrently with PSYC 554. Students will administer, score, report, and interpret published norm-referenced measures of intelligence, memory, achievement, perceptional, adaptive, and special abilities typically used in educational environments.

PSYC 560. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY CONSULTATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate program in school psychology.
This course focuses on the history and principles of collaborative consultation and their application within the school setting. While traditional models of consultation are taught (organizational, behavioral and mental health), this course explores the key components to developing healthy family-school relationships and requires students to work with parents and teachers through Conjoint Behavioral Consultation. Consultation with systems as a preventive strategy is also emphasized, and students complete a school-wide analysis project.

PSYC 561. INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
This course surveys the application of psychological principles and methods of work. It includes employee selection, motivation, performance and behavior; the structure and function of occupational positions and activities; and the nature, processes and development of organizations.

PSYC 565. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY. 4 Credits.

This course focuses on psychopathological disorders of childhood and adolescence, critically attending to normal and abnormal developmental sequences. Attention is given to the diagnosis and implications of such disorders, and to clinical and educational intervention methods.

PSYC 566. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND CLINICAL NEUROSCIENCE I. 4 Credits.

This is the first course in a two-quarter sequence of instruction that focuses on describing and understanding psychopathological disorders of childhood and adolescence. A critical emphasis is placed on the neurobiological influences that underlie typical and atypical developmental sequences. Attention is also given to the diagnosis and implications of such disorders and to clinical and educational intervention methods.

PSYC 567. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND CLINICAL NEUROSCIENCE II. 4 Credits.

This is the second course in a two-quarter sequence of instruction that focuses on describing and understanding psychopathological disorders of childhood and adolescence. A critical emphasis is placed on the neurobiological influences that underlie typical and atypical developmental sequences. Attention is also given to the diagnosis and implications of such disorders and to clinical and educational intervention methods.

PSYC 569. FAMILY SYSTEMS AND PARENT EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate program: mental health or school counseling emphasis or permission of instructor.
The foundations of family systems theory. Examines the interaction between parents, development of the child and the relationship of the family to the school and community. Approaches to child rearing, management and discipline will be considered. Special consideration is given to parent education classes and recent literature in parent counseling.

PSYC 570. CHILDHOOD PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND TREATMENT. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
This course focuses on psychopathological disorders of childhood and adolescence, critically attending to normal and abnormal developmental sequences. Attention is given to the diagnosis and implications of such disorders and to clinical intervention methods.

PSYC 574. CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: psychology graduate status.
This course investigates the literature and methods involved in the psychological study of people from different cultures – both subcultures within the US and peoples from around the world. It also addresses the question of universality of psychological phenomenon. Graduate students focus particularly on how these findings apply within their graduate field of study.

PSYC 575. DSM TREATMENT ISSUES FOR COUNSELORS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate counseling program: mental health or school counseling emphasis or permission of the instructor.
The examination of current issues related to the classification and diagnosis of abnormal behavior and psychological states and their relationship to treatment. Dimensional, categorical and functional approaches to classification are reviewed, with emphasis on current forms of child and adult psychopathology found in the DSM-IV-TR. Diagnostic topics include historical influences, cultural variation, symptomology, etiology, developmental patterns and treatment approaches to various diagnostic categories.

PSYC 576. PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: successful completion of two quarters of mental health counseling Internship in the graduate counseling program: mental health emphasis.
This course provides students an opportunity to transition from the role of a counselor in training to a beginning professional in the field of mental health counseling. Topics will include advocacy, post graduate credentials, supervision, managed health care systems, agency and private practice and organizational change. An emphasis will be placed on professional identity and roles.

PSYC 579. ADVANCED DIAGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT. 4 Credits.

This course is an advanced assessment course that prepares candidates for diagnosis and classification in accordance with multiple theories existing in the clinical and educational research. Students utilize cognitive, academic, and social/emotional data in developing hypotheses regarding the presence of learning and social-emotional disability and in planning for intervention delivery. The course emphasizes the complex variables of culture, environment and language in making inferences regarding the presence of a disability.

PSYC 580. CONSULATION IN THE COUNSELING PROFESSION. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: advanced standing (2nd year) in graduate counseling: mental health or school counseling emphasis, graduate social work, or graduate school psychology programs or permission of instructor.
Application of psychological skills to organizations and systems; systems analysis and interventions; case consultation; peer consultation and consultation with other human service professionals. Includes information on team building, conflict resolution and the counselor’s role as a systems change agent.

PSYC 581. PREJUDICE AND STEREOTYPING. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 381 or instructor permission.
The course Prejudice and Stereotyping is a five credit discussion course that examines the social psychological underpinnings of prejudice, stereotyping and discrimination. The course topics will address specific types of prejudice such as sexism and racism, individual differences and cognitive states that can lead to prejudice, the effect of prejudice on its targets and reducing prejudice.

PSYC 582. ADVANCED SCHOOL COUNSELING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate counseling program: school counseling emphasis.
This course provides students with an understanding of the comprehensive school counseling model. Students will learn how to convey themselves as a professional school counselor and to create documents to convey that. Students will learn ways to collaborate with other school professionals and those in K-12 students lives.

PSYC 583. GROUP EXPERIENCE. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate counseling program: mental health or school counseling emphasis or permission of the instructor.
This class will provide a group process experience for first year students in mental health and school counseling emphases.

PSYC 584. GROUP THEORY. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate program: mental health or school counseling emphasis or permission of instructor.
Factors that lead to group change, membership, goals, productivity and organization.

PSYC 585. GROUP PROCESS IN COUNSELING. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: successful completion of PSYC 584 or permission of instructor.
Students will participate in and practice serving as facilitators of groups.

PSYC 586. PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: admission into psychology MS program.
Professional Standards presents legal, ethical and moral aspects of the professional practice of psychology.

PSYC 587. ADDICTIVE BEHAVIOR COUNSELING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate program: mental health or school counseling emphasis or permission of instructor.
Graduate course of theory and pragmatics in addictive behavior counseling that documents the personal, social and cultural impact of addiction. The course is designed for those with a specific interest in the nature and treatment of addictive behavior and students preparing for careers in the helping professions. The course presents an integrated overview of modern research and intervention approaches. A variety of viewpoints, theories and treatment approaches will be introduced.

PSYC 588. CRISIS INTERVEN AND TRUAMA COUNSEL. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate program: mental health or school counseling emphasis or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the theory, impact, issues and skills of crisis counseling due to traumatic events such as: violence, child abuse, mass casualty events and suicide ideation, as well as the nature, causes and symptoms of professional burnout for crisis workers. The course will examine models for working with children and adolescents, working with victims of violence, suicide prevention, issues of health-related school and mental health crises and the ethical, legal and diversity factors of crisis intervention.

PSYC 590. DIVERSITY COUNSELING. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate counseling program: mental health or school counseling emphasis or permission of instructor.
This course will introduce students to a broad spectrum of issues of diversity in counseling, including an examination of their own personal history/background and its impact on their perception of and response to diversity in clients. In this class, the term “diversity” includes differences in racial and ethnic origins, gender, ability, physicality, belief systems, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, developmental stage and variability of intellectual functioning.

PSYC 591. ADVANCED PSYCHOTHERAPY STRATEGIES. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PSYC 551.
Lecture and practical demonstration of therapeutic strategies and techniques. Advanced development of case conceptualization and therapeutic interventions.

PSYC 592. SUICIDE ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: Admission to the Counselor Education program, or instructor permission. Undergraduate enrollment with instructor permission.
This course provides an overview of suicide risk and protective factors. Outlines a working assessment framework to assign risk as well as intervention techniques and best practices, including referral when needed.

PSYC 594. PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN SCHOOL COUNSELING. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the graduate counseling program: school counseling emphasis.
This course provides information and experiences to enable the student to transition from the role of counselor in training to that of a professional in the field of school counseling. Topics include advocacy, management of school counseling services and programs, professional identity. Students contribute to the topics surveyed in this course based on experiences in the program.

PSYC 596. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

PSYC 597. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: only one workshop course for up to 3 credits may be used to fulfill graduate degree requirements.

PSYC 598. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: may be graded or offered Pass/No Credit at the discretion of the instructor.
Current problems in psychology are presented by department faculty.

PSYC 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

PSYC 600. THESIS. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
A bound research study conducted as partial fulfillment of a master's under the direction of a graduate committee.

PSYC 601. RESEARCH REPORT. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
A research study in lieu of a bound thesis conducted as partial fulfillment of a master's under the direction of a graduate committee.

PSYC 602. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PORTFOLIO. 1-6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to School Psychology Program.
Students prepare reflections and evidence to document their knowledge and competence in the NASP standards for training and practice. An informal presentation of the portfolio is provided at the end of the second year of the program to document readiness for the internship experience. In the third year of the program, students provide a formal presentation as a culminating experience in the program.

PSYC 603. PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING PORTFOLIO. 1-6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to Counselor Education Program.
Students prepare reflections and evidence to document their knowledge and competence in the CACREP and PESB standards for training and practice. A formal presentation of the portfolio is provided at the end of the second year of the program and serves as a culminating experience in the program.

PSYC 651. ADVANCED PSYCHOTHERAPY STRATEGIES. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission into the psychology MS program with clinical emphasis or instructor permission, PSYC 551.
Advanced techniques and strategies of psychological treatment. Techniques reviewed could include compassion focused therapy, solution focused therapy, brief therapeutic strategies, dialectical behavior therapy and/or other therapeutic strategies used in the field. Practical application of techniques will be experienced.

PSYC 694. PRACTICUM. 1-8 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit.
Pre-requisites: admission to psychology MS program or school psychology program.
Supervised experience of a clinical or counseling nature in service areas or supervised experience in research.

PSYC 695. INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. 1-6 Credits.

Notes: may be graded Pass/No Credit.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean and must be in the school psychology program.
Experience under supervision in selecting, administering and scoring tests. Opportunities for diagnosis, counseling evaluation and reporting.

PSYC 696. COLLEGE TEACHING INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor and the department chair.
Teaching a lower-division college course under the supervision of a regular faculty member. Includes course planning, arranging bibliographical and other instructional aids, conferences with students, experience in classroom instruction, and student and course evaluation.

PSYC 697. INTERNSHIP IN PSYCHOLOGY. 1-10 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Internship experience of professionally supervised training in approved agency or institution. The period of internship will commence on the date it is approved by the department chair and no internship credit will be granted retroactively.