Social Work Courses


Social Work Courses


SOWK 273. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101.
This course explores the history of social work and social welfare in the United States. Students will gain an understanding of values and ethics related to social work practice social work interventions related to issues of social justice, oppression and discrimination.

SOWK 320. AFRICAN AMERICAN FAMILY. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: AAST 320, SOCI 371.
The African American Family as a social system influenced by institutions of the larger American society.

SOWK 377. ALTERNATIVES TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE. 2 Credits.

Cross-listed: WMST 377.
Working to interrupt the cycle of violence this course analyzes theories relevant to issues of domestic violence in their historical, legal and cultural contexts.

SOWK 378. HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BASW major.
Employs a systems framework for using biopsychosocial research findings, theories and related knowledge to understand the development and behavior of individuals and families. Examines the reciprocal influences of culture, social injustice, poverty and related phenomena on development and behavior. Critically assesses the related research.

SOWK 379. HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT II. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BASW major.
A continuation of the approach to understanding the biopsychosocial influences on development and behavior taken in SOWK 378.

SOWK 381. DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL WORK. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BASW Major.
This course emphasizes the development of a knowledge base and skills for working in a diverse society at both the direct and indirect practice levels. Diverse populations refers mainly to major ethnic/racial groups although other oppressed populations will be addressed. While brief descriptive materials are explored for each population, a primary critical task is the examination of one's own attitudes and values. Models of evidence-based practice with diverse populations will be presented for comparative purposes. Various experiential techniques may be used to implement the teaching objectives.

SOWK 395. EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Individualized learning and career development through an off-campus internship. Designed to help students develop beginning knowledge of agency work. Does not substitute for Field Practicum but gives added preparation to students with minimal work experience.

SOWK 399. SPECIAL STUDIES. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

SOWK 418. FINANCIAL EMPOWERMENT IN SOCIAL WORK. 4 Credits.

Notes: may be stacked with SOWK 518.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
Building financial capability for all is one of the grand challenges for social work. This course equips students with financial knowledge and skills to empower themselves and their clients to move along the path of financial stability and economic security.

SOWK 420. CONFLICT MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of conflict management in four contexts: intrapersonal, interpersonal, groups and societal. The focus is on the analysis and practical management of conflict as a common denominator linking a wide variety of human activities. A micro to macro overview of the dynamics of conflict management from one-on-one communication to the practices of negotiation and mediation to international/global efforts toward peace will be explored.

SOWK 421. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE WITH MEN AND FAMILIES. 2-4 Credits.

This course addresses important information regarding social work services with men and their families. It is designed to be a broad overview of common issues faced by men who come to the attention of social services and what social workers can do to support and engage with men in practice.

SOWK 422. SPIRITUALITY AND SOCIAL WORK PRACTICUM. 2-4 Credits.

This overview of spirituality and social work provides a framework of knowledge, values and skills for spiritually sensitive social work practice and prepares students to respond competently and ethically to diverse spiritual perspectives through a comparative, critically reflective approach.

SOWK 424. INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL WORK. 4 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated for credit when title varies.
Pre-requisites: permission of instructor.
This variable topic course will provide students with a cross cultural experience in which they will learn about another culture, social development and various ideologies of social welfare. Students will learn about social development strategies intended to address specific social problems and social justice issues.

SOWK 425. FAMILY VIOLENCE. 4 Credits.

Cross-listed: WMST 425.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
This interdisciplinary course addresses contemporary concerns about family violence and discusses feminist perspectives on violence in the family. Theories about the historical and socio-cultural context of family violence and other explanatory theories provide frameworks for understanding personal and societal responses to family violence. Discussions include dynamics of trauma and recovery and all forms of family violence. Treatment as well as intervention, prevention, and social change approaches are discussed on both the personal and societal level.

SOWK 429. SOCIAL WORK IN HEALTH CARE. 4 Credits.

Notes: may be stacked with SOWK 539.
Pre-requisites: seniors and graduate students in the School of Social Work and related fields.
This course will provide knowledge and understanding of direct social work practice in various health care settings. The effect of managed care and other current macro practice issues will be explored along with the continuum of health care. Advances in biotechnology and bioethics perspectives will be examined. The roles that diversity play in social work health care practice is emphasized. Self-awareness as a medical social worker is explored.

SOWK 437. INDIAN CHILD WELFARE. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: IDST 437.
Satisfies: Cultural and Gender Diversity in the U.S.
This course introduces Indian Child Welfare (ICW) with an emphasis on understanding legal, historical, and cultural issues applying to work with American Indian and Alaska Native families. This course describes ICW as a method of culturally appropriate child welfare practice that draws on traditions of American Indian and Alaska Native nations. Many elements of ICW may serve as evidence-based best practice principles for child welfare. The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (ICWA, United States Code Title 25, §1901-1963) is central to this course and child welfare practice.

SOWK 445. BEHAVIORAL AND COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: SOWK 475.
This course introduces participants to the theory and practice of behavioral and cognitive behavioral intervention. This course facilitates participants understanding of key concepts of applied behavior analysis, including behavioral assessment, behavioral interventions methods for monitoring the efficacy of behavioral approaches with individual cases. This course will also enable participants to become better acquainted with how to apply cognitive behavioral (CB) principles in assessment and intervention, including identifying self-defeating cognitions and cognitive restructuring. Participants should come to understand behavioral and cognitive behavioral interventions as individualized approaches to practice. The applied nature of this course requires a commitment from participants to attend all class sessions during this course.

SOWK 448. LGBTQ ISSUES FOR THE PROFESSIONAL. 4 Credits.

Cross-listed: WMST 448.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
The course is designed to assist professionals working with individuals whose identity includes lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer/questioning. Topics include: historical oppression, “coming out” as a process, counseling approaches and resources, and social inclusion and exclusion of sexual minorities. Personal attitudes are explored in order to improve professional response to the needs of the LGBTQ communities.

SOWK 450. WOMEN AND SOCIAL CHANGE. 4 Credits.

Cross-listed: WMST 450.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
This course examines the historical and contemporary role of women as leaders and participants in U. S. social movements. The course critiques the models and strategies used to organize communities and groups to improve the status of marginalized people.

SOWK 452. GENDER AND SEXUAL ASSAULT. 4 Credits.

Cross-listed: WMST 452.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
This course addresses contemporary concerns about sexual assault, primarily, but not exclusively, against women. Feminist perspectives on gender socialization and sexual violence provide frameworks for understanding personal and societal responses to sexual violence. Dynamics of trauma and recovery, treatment, prevention and change strategies will be discussed.

SOWK 455. SOCIAL POLICY AND PROGRAMS IN AGING. 3 Credits.

Cross-listed: AGST 455.
Pre-requisites: AGST 310 or permission of the instructor.
Social welfare policies and programs serving the aging are examined, past and present, in terms of their overall impact on the aged and on society at large. The needs and gaps in services to the aged are evaluated, as well as the adequacy with which these services are delivered and the response of programs and services to the changing needs of the aged.

SOWK 456. THE OLDER WOMAN. 4 Credits.

Cross-listed: AGST 456, WMST 456.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
This course examines the research and practice knowledge on the social, economic and health problems confronting older women. Older women’s needs and potential for change are considered. The course explores U.S. social policy and program alternatives that work to improve the status and quality of life for a growing and diverse population of older women.

SOWK 457. CLINICAL ASSESSMENT IN MIDLIFE AND OLDER ADULTS. 4 Credits.

Cross-listed: AGST 457.
Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor.
An introduction to the assessment skills required for professional social work practice in mental health and other clinical settings dealing with the elderly. The course is intended for social work practitioners.

SOWK 458. PERSPECTIVES ON DEATH AND DYING. 4 Credits.

Cross-listed: AGST 458.
This course is designed to assist students in the helping professions who wish to work with the terminally ill. Focus will be on an increased ability to deal with one’s own mortality; the development of beginning skills for working with the terminally ill and their families; an understanding of the complex social system which surrounds death in modern America; as well as the current moral, ethical and philosophical issues in the field.

SOWK 459. SURVEY OF MICROSYSTEMIC PRACTICE THEORIES. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BASW major.
This survey course prepares students for professional practice involving the dynamic and interactive processes of engagement, assessment, intervention and evaluation through identifying and analyzing evidence-based interventions designed to achieve client goals. Students will distinguish, appraise and integrate multiple sources of knowledge, including research-based knowledge and practice wisdom, as these inform micro systemic practice theories. Students will continue learning to use research evidence to inform practice through critical thinking.

SOWK 468. SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BASW major.
Prepares students to evaluate research findings and to engage in evidence based social work practice.

SOWK 469. DATA ANALYSIS FOR SOCIAL WORK. 4 Credits.

This course covers descriptive and inferential statistics. Students are introduced to software for data analysis.

SOWK 470. SOCIAL POLICY ANALYSIS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BASW major.
Introduction to social policy analysis and the social policy process. Examines various policies and processes of social legislation in terms of their impact on social service programs.

SOWK 471. HUMAN RIGHTS AND WOMEN'S RIGHTS. 4 Credits.

Cross-listed: WMST 471.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
The course examines the history of human rights and dignity using the declaration of rights by the United Nations and research and initiatives by the World Health Organization and other international human rights groups. The course covers topics on the human rights of women and children including health, food insecurity, economic status, housing, education, violence, war crimes and residency/citizenship status. It also examines international and national strategies for furthering human rights on the global stage.

SOWK 472. SOCIAL WORK WITH VETERANS AND MILITARY FAMILIES. 4 Credits.

Notes: may be stacked with SOWK 564.
Due to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, there is an increased need for social workers to be prepared to work with veterans and military service members. Over a million soldiers have been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan and nearly half of those soldiers are National Guard or Reserve members. As soldiers continue to deploy and return from service overseas, they and their families’ needs for professional social work services will continue to increase. Furthermore, only a proportion of military service members who seek services will seek them through the Department of Veterans Affairs. This means that social workers in all areas of practice need to be educated about working with military service members and their families. This course includes content on military culture, strengths and needs of military families, and interventions for military service members and their families.

SOWK 475. SOCIAL WORK ENGAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BASW major.
In this first of a two course sequence relationship building skills are emphasized to begin gathering and interpreting biopsychosocial data on the interactions between individuals, families, and other groups and their environments. Emphasizes culturally competent, strengths-based and systems oriented assessment. Demonstrates how social work values and the generalist perspective guide engagement. Explores the role of self in helping process.

SOWK 476. SOCIAL WORK ASSESSMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BASW major.
In this second of a two course sequence assessment skills are emphasized for gathering and interpreting biopsychosocial data on the interactions between individuals, families, and other groups and their environments. Emphasizes culturally competent, strengths-based and systems oriented assessment. Demonstrates how social work values and the generalist perspective guide assessment. Explores the role of self in helping process.

SOWK 477. SOCIAL WORK WITH COMMUNITIES. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BASW major.
This course prepares students to engage with, assess the needs and assets of and plan for action with communities. This course also guides students in experiences of direct assessment and action in the context of community. Students will learn to apply Asset Based Community and Social Development models in their work with communities toward social justice and sustainable change in communities and services.

SOWK 478. SOCIAL WORK WITH INDIVIDUALS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BASW major.
Applies the assessment information obtained in SOWK 475 and SOWK 476 to social work interventions with individuals. Emphasizes culturally competent interventions which build on strengths and resources in multiple environments. Continues examination of self in role of change agent.

SOWK 479. SOCIAL WORK WITH GROUPS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BASW major.
This course focuses on the social work skills for working with groups. Values, use of self, cultural competence, strengths and resources continue to be important practice skills within this new context. Critical thinking and effective communication are additional foci for knowledge and skill development.

SOWK 480. FIELD PREPARATION. 1 Credit.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
Pre-requisites: BASW Major.
This course prepares students to enter the social work practicum/seminar. Students will learn how to create a résumé, be interviewed for an agency placement and learn how to be a student worker within a social service environment. Students will integrate their knowledge and skills with practices in the agency.

SOWK 481. PRACTICUM SEMINAR II. 1 Credit.

Integrates classroom knowledge and skills with real world social agency tasks and processes student experiences in the practicum. Because the student will be asked to perform different tasks at this stage in practicum learning, the content of the seminar will likewise change. Continued emphasis on application and fit of social work values in the real world.

SOWK 482. PRACTICUM/SEMINAR. 1-6 Credits.

Notes: Graded Pass/Fail. Must be repeated three times for a total of 15 credits.
Pre-requisites: BASW major in good standing and SOWK 480.
Students integrate coursework in a practice setting and process agency experience in a seminar setting. In a social work agency, students, agency field instructors and faculty field instructors plan activities which support the development of generalist skills as specified in individualized learning agreements.

SOWK 483. PRACTICUM II. 7 Credits.

In Block Practicum II, students integrate course work in a practice setting. In a social work agency, students, agency field instructors, and faculty field instructors plan activities which support the development of generalist skills as specified in individualized learning contracts.

SOWK 490. SOCIAL WORK SENIOR CAPSTONE. 4 Credits.

Notes: this course should be taken in the student's final quarter in the BASW program.
Pre-requisites: senior and in good standing as a BASW major.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
This course further develops students’ applied knowledge and skill in the domains of critical, integrative, multidimensional and contextual thinking; cultural competence; social work practice with populations at risk; civic mindedness; professional identity; problem solving; the ability to understand the connection between social policy, social problems and social work practice; and evidence based social work practice.

SOWK 492. CHILD WELFARE PROGRAMS AND SERVICES. 5 Credits.

The function and purposes of child welfare programs, public and private; child welfare legislation; trends in child welfare services. Elective.

SOWK 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-6 Credits.

Experimental course, title and credits vary.

SOWK 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Short duration programs of contemporary significance in societal-cultural behavior areas. The range and scope of topics are essentially interdisciplinary, and students from all academic areas are eligible to participate.

SOWK 498. DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated once for credit.
Readings and evaluations in contemporary issues in social welfare. Elective.

SOWK 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Independent study in selected areas of social work. Open to seniors and graduate students from any department. Elective.

SOWK 518. FINANCIAL EMPOWERMENT IN SOCIAL WORK. 4 Credits.

Notes: may be stacked with SOWK 418.
Building financial capability for all is one of the grand challenges for social work. This course equips students with financial knowledge and skills to empower themselves and their clients to move along the path of financial stability and economic security.

SOWK 525. RESEARCH METHODS FOR PROGRAM AND PRACTICE EVALUATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of the instructor.
An overview of methods and procedures for conducting research in social work. Attention is given to research designs for evaluating social work practice with small systems and social welfare programs. Students learn to critically evaluate and utilize research, select research instruments, and design applied research projects.

SOWK 526. RESEARCH METHODS II. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: SOWK 525 and 2 credits of SOWK 571; or SOWK 561.
This course facilitates the integration of foundation year research knowledge into a form that readily applies to professional social work practice. Students will learn how to apply and utilize research data through an exploratory best practice model and other models by deconstructing existing research.

SOWK 529. SOCIAL WORK IN HEALTH CARE. 4 Credits.

Notes: may be stacked with SOWK 429.
Pre-requisites: open to seniors and graduate students in the School of Social Work and related fields.
This course is designed to provide knowledge and understanding of direct social work practice in various health care settings. The students will examine the impact of illness, disease, trauma/disability, and death and dying from ecological and systems perspectives. Roles, functions, and administrative responsibilities of the social worker as case manager, health educator, advocate and a member of interdisciplinary teams will be reviewed. The effect of managed care and other current macro practice issues will be explored along with the continuum of health care. Advances in biotechnology and bioethics perspectives will be examined. The roles that diversity (ex. age, gender, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion/spirituality, etc.) play in social work health care practice is emphasized. Self-awareness as a medical social worker is explored.

SOWK 530. ORGANIZATIONAL AND COMMUNITY PRACTICE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of the instructor.
This course explores the nature of community organizations and social service delivery systems and their relationships to other community systems. Attention is given to understanding the dynamics of power, economics, politics, and social policies impacting the life of organizations and communities. Students are introduced to ways of assessing organizations and communities with a particular emphasis on community collaborative networks and partnership projects that impact direct service delivery for at-risk populations in urban and rural contexts.

SOWK 531. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WELFARE AND POLICY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of the instructor.
This course provides students with a foundation understanding and appraisal of social welfare policies and programs in the United States, and the historical and contemporary forces that have shaped their development. It introduces core concepts to provide both an understanding of the political process and the analytic skills needed to further the achievement of social work goals regarding social policies and programs. The course also reviews the development of the social work profession and its influence on social welfare policies.

SOWK 532. FOUNDATIONS OF PROFESSIONAL SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of the instructor.
This course provides a framework for understanding the mission and purpose of social work practice, the historical roots and ethical foundations for the profession, and emerging themes and models of practice. The course highlights required theoretical knowledge for informed practice, advanced generalist practice principles, and the specific roles in day-by-day professional practice. Cultural competence as an essential element of practice is also emphasized. The course introduces students to the challenges of graduate social work education and to the professional culture of social work, typified by NASW, its professional organiztion.

SOWK 533. SOCIAL WORK ASSESSMENT AND PRACTICE WITH INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of the instructor.
Examines individual and family intervention within American social systems across ethnic, social, class and gender differences. Students learn effective strengths-based interviewing processes with individuals and families and build communications skills. The organizing framework for intervention is ecological systems and a strengths perspective. Current practice models that incorporate the organizing framework are reviewed for their application to specific problem situations.

SOWK 534. HUMAN RIGHTS AND WOMEN'S RIGHTS. 4 Credits.

This in an interdisciplinary course for students in social work and women’s studies, who are interested in how human rights standards can be understood and applied in social work and civic life. The purpose of this course is to explore how the promotion of human rights relates to the mission of social work and women’s studies and how this knowledge can affect social change efforts and promote civil society.

SOWK 536. SPIRITUALITY AND SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE. 4 Credits.

This overview of spirituality and social work provides a framework of knowledge, values and skills for spiritually sensitive social work practice and prepares students to respond competently and ethically to diverse spiritual perspectives through a comparative, critically reflective approach.

SOWK 537. INDIAN CHILD WELFARE. 4 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to Indian child welfare with an emphasis on understanding legal, historical and cultural issues applying to work with American Indian and Alaska Native youth. This course emphasizes Indian child welfare issues relevant to the Pacific Northwest (Washington, Idaho, Oregon and Montana).

SOWK 538. INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL WORK. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: special permission of the instructor.
International Social Work provides students with a cross-cultural experience in which they will learn about various cultural norms, social development and ideologies of social welfare from the unique perspective of the area visited. Students will learn about social development strategies intended to address specific social problems and social justice issues relevant to the native population of the region.

SOWK 540. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CONTEMPORARY ENVIRONMENTS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of the instructor.
Research and theory about contexts and interactions influencing human development over the life course. Emphasis on understanding life course development in oppressed, vulnerable, and underserved populations. Critical attention is paid to the use and limits of research and theory in relation to these populations.

SOWK 541. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of the instructor.
For purposes of this course, diverse populations refers mainly to ethnic groups; however, other diverse groups are discussed. After brief descriptive materials are presented for each population, the course emphasizes the development of a knowledge base and skills for working with diverse populations at both the direct practice and macro levels. A primary critical skill is the examination of one's own attitudes and values. Models of practice with diverse populations are presented for comparative purposes.

SOWK 542. SOCIAL WORK IN CHILD WELFARE. 4 Credits.

SOWK 543. ALTERNATIVES TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE. 2-4 Credits.

Analyzes theories relevant to issues of domestic violence in their historical, legal and cultural contexts. Therapeutic interventions are explored.

SOWK 544. SPECIAL PROBLEMS: FAMILY VIOLENCE. 4 Credits.

Students will identify factors related to stress in families, socioeconomic and cultural patterns, historical traditions and societal values and investigate how these may relate to violent behavior.

SOWK 545. BEHAVIORAL AND COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS. 4 Credits.

This course will introduce participants to the theory and practice of behavioral and cognitive-behavioral intervention. The course will facilitate participants understanding of (1) key concepts of behavior modification, including reinforcement, punishment and extinction; (2) key concepts of behavioral assessment, including target behaviors, antecedents and consequences, as well as dimensions of behavior (frequency, intensity, duration); (3) types of behavioral interventions, including conditioning, shaping and behavior-maintenance schedules; and (4) methods for monitoring the efficacy of behavioral approaches with individual cases. This course will also enable participants to become better acquainted with how to apply cognitive behavioral (CB) principles in assessment and intervention, including (1) behavioral self monitoring, successive approximation, identifying self-defeating cognitions, cognitive restructuring and working with cognitive schemata; (2) implementing CB principles in a group setting using the Adolescent Coping with Depression Course (CWD-A) as a model; and (3) supporting and monitoring the progress of the clients in CB intervention through the use of CWD-A homework assignments. Participants should come to understand behavioral and cognitive-behavioral interventions as ideographic, as opposed to homothetic, approaches to practice.

SOWK 546. MINDFULNESS AND ACCEPTANCE APPROACHES IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: current MSW student or by permission of instructor.
This intensive course will introduce participants to the theory and practice of acceptance and mindfulness applications in cognitive behavioral interventions. The course will facilitate participants understanding of; (1) key concepts of cognitive behavioral therapy, including acceptance and mindfulness approaches, (2) key concepts of assessment, including value inventories, (3) types of acceptance and mindfulness CBT interventions, including Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and (4) in-session activities and interventions to facilitate change with individuals and groups.

SOWK 547. MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING. 4 Credits.

Motivational Interviewing (MI0 is an effective evidenced-based approach to overcoming the factors that keep people from making desired changes in their lives even after seeking or being referred to professional treatment. This course reviews the conceptual and research background supporting MI and the Transtheoretical Model (Stages of Change-SOC) and provides practice in implementing the skills involved in their approaches.

SOWK 550. SOCIAL WORK WITH GROUPS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of the instructor.
The course develops knowledge and skills for social work practice with groups and natural helping systems. Prepares students to utilize mutual aid groups as a helping resource for clients, facilitate treatment groups, and participate effectively as a member of committees, interagency teams, and other task groups. The practice of work with groups is presented through lecture and discussion, observational assignments, role plays, and participation in small group learning experiences.

SOWK 551. WOMEN AND SOCIAL CHANGE. 4 Credits.

This course examines the historical and contemporary role of women as leaders and participants in U. S. social movements. The course critiques the models and strategies used to organize communities and groups to improve the status of marginalized people.

SOWK 552. ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CHANGE. 4 Credits.

This course focuses on leadership and change in social service agencies in relationship to the roles and functions of managers and administrators. The course provides a general overview of administrative and supervisory functions in social agencies focusing on the knowledge, values and skills needed for managing change and providing leadership. These are the qualities needed for successful administrative practice in first line and middle management positions and in small agencies typically found in rural and regional contexts.

SOWK 553. SOCIAL WORK INTERVENTION AND EVALUATION WITH INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of the instructor.
Continues social work practice knowledge and skill development for work with individuals and families. This is the second of a two-course sequence focused on the intervention, ongoing assessment and the termination and evaluation phases of the helping process. The course provides both didactic and experiential learning experiences relative to communication skills, counseling and therapy skills, and termination and practice evaluation strategies.

SOWK 554. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN SEXUALITY. 4 Credits.

From the time of conception, there are forces continuously affecting our sexuality. This course has been developed to assist participants to develop skills to work with people as sexual beings. Self assessment by each person with regard to his or her own values should occur throughout the course. Sexual functioning and a variety of conditions affecting sexual functioning will be explored. It is intended that participants will leave this course with the basic knowledge, attitudes and skills to deal with sexual questions and concerns of clients. Course content will include: (1) basic issues in sexuality; (2) sexuality throughout the lifespan; (3) anatomy and physiology of the sexual response cycle; (4) sexual alternatives; (5) sexuality in illness and disability; (6) sexual dysfunctions; and (7) treatment issues.

SOWK 555. CONFLICT MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of conflict management in four contexts: intrapersonal, interpersonal, groups and societal. The focus is on the analysis and practical management of conflict as a common denominator linking a wide variety of human activities. A micro to macro overview of the dynamics of conflict management from one-on-one communication to the practices of negotiation and mediation to international/global efforts toward peace will be explored.

SOWK 557. BIOPSYCH BASES FOR HUMAN DEV. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of the instructor.
This course focuses primarily on the biosocial aspects of human development. Biosocial development is defined as including heredity, physical traits and diseases, neurological functioning and disorders, and sexual functioning and the reciprocal relationships between biosocial development and social contexts--the meanings of gender, sexual orientation, and disability in society. The course is designed to help students gain familiarity with human physical systems, to identify their functions and to understand the implications of dysfunction. The course will aslo focus on disability issues and the effects of living with a disability. Students will be able to critically analyze the biopsychosocial and cultural implications of physical functioning in people's everyday lives and apply this understanding to professional practice.

SOWK 558. GAY/LESBIAN ISSUES FOR SW. 4 Credits.

This course is designed to assist professionals who may encounter lesbians, gays, bisexuals, persons questioning their sexuality and transgendered as clients. Students in the course will be encouraged to deal openly with their feelings and attitudes about homosexuality. Class members will be allowed to explore their motivations and resistance to working with this client group and those hostile to them and will be helped, where possible, to resolve blocks to effective social provision. Additionally, this course is designed to educate and suggest counseling approaches that might be most helpful to this client population and to explore available support systems. Issues that will receive special attention include health, problems of rural lesbians and gay men, the aging, child welfare, homophobia, the "coming out" process and societal attitudes toward gays, lesbians, questioning and transgendered populations.

SOWK 559. SCHOOL SOCIAL WORK AND SCHOOL LAW. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: baccalaureate degree.
This course will review Federal and State legislation as well as local policies which affect the role of the social worker in the public school. We will review how the school system functions as a part of our total society. The course will describe how social work knowledge, skills, and values provide an ecological approach to preventative, crisis, and remedial care for school children and their families.

SOWK 560. TOPICS OF SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE. 1-6 Credits.

Selected and variable content around topics related to social work and social welfare.

SOWK 561. ADVANCED STANDING SEMINAR. 6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission into advanced standing MSW program or permission of MSW Director.
This course provides Advanced Standing students with an overview of the foundation requirements for advanced study in the MSW program. It prepares students with additional problem formulation, sampling, data collection, measurement and research designs to complete the advanced year applied research project.

SOWK 562. SUICIDE ASSESSMENT, TREATMENT AND MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Cross-listed: ADST 562.
Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
This course explores the theoretical foundation in the clinical assessment, treatment and management of suicidal risk over time through case management with suicidal persons. Additionally, we will review instructions in “evidenced-based” and “best practices” for the treatment and case management with the suicidal person within the scope of practice. We also have role play exercises that include therapeutic interventions, initial treatment planning including case notes, coordination of services and referral.

SOWK 563. BRIEF INTERVENTIONS. 4 Credits.

This course is designed to help students to integrate a cognitive and practical understanding of brief intervention strategies within their practice with individuals, couples and families. Content areas include an overview of the theoretical base of the solution-focused model of intervention, the professional debate regarding the use of the short-term model, and the potential benefits of its application in the health-care reform environment.

SOWK 564. SOCIAL WORK WITH VETERANS AND MILITARY FAMILIES. 4 Credits.

This course includes content on military culture, strengths and needs of military families, and interventions for military service members and their families. The course goal is to prepare social workers to work with veterans and military service members. As soldiers continue to deploy and return from service, they and their families’ needs for professional social work services will continue to increase. This means that social workers in all areas of practice need to be educated about working with this population.

SOWK 565. FAMILY-CENTERED PRACTICE WITH POPULATIONS AT-RISK. 4 Credits.

Provides students with advanced direct practice knowledge and skills for work with populations at-risk in the context of families. Students are introduced to strategies for family-centered practice that are derived from ecological systems, developmental, behavioral, intergenerational, and cognitive practice traditions. Core concepts emphasized in the course include respect and support of family decisions, collaborative problem-solving, a strengths orientation, flexibility of approach, family empowerment, and support for families in their caregiving role.

SOWK 568. PROSEMINARS IN SOCIAL WELFARE POLICIES AND PROGRAMS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: SOWK 525, SOWK 531 and 2 credits of SOWK 571; or SOWK 561.
Advanced seminars on current policy and program developments in contemporary areas of social welfare which impact populations at-risk, including health care, aging, mental health, and services to children and families. Seminars provide research and theory pertaining to social problems and institutional responses. Three domains of institutional response--legal, professional, and program--receive attention.

SOWK 569. ACVANCED SCHOOL SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE. 4 Credits.

The goal of this course is to assist the student in developing a comprehensive and in-depth understanding of current school social work practice. The values, purpose, knowledge base and sanctions which undergird the specialized, professional practice of school social work will be discussed, analyzed and applied experientially to practice situations. Learning experiences are designed to promote understanding of the many dimensions, opportunities for creative practice and rigors of social work practice in schools.

SOWK 571. FOUNDATION PRACTICUM/SEMINAR. 1-4 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit.
Pre-requisites: SOWK 531, SOWK 532, SOWK 553. (A total of 4 credits distributed over 2 qtrs for the full-time program and over 3 qtrs.
for the part-time programs.) Students in Foundation Practicum/Seminar utilize the agency setting for integration of coursework knowledge and for the development of professional practice skills. The placement agency is the laboratory for the application of classroom learning. Practicum is a supervised experience which allows students to learn to use supervision as a professional development process and to receive feedback concerning their professional functioning. The seminar is the forum in which students share, compare and analyze the field experience and participate in learning activities focused on application of curriculum content to practice. It is designed to assist in the integration process to provide support for students in discussion of practice issues and learning experiences and to engage students in utilizing course content to enhance their professional practice.

SOWK 572. FAMILY SYSTEMS AND ILLNESS. 4 Credits.

This course examines the impact of chronic and life-threatening illness upon the functioning abilities of both healthy and troubled families, communities and health care systems. Through the lens of illness, the course looks at how families communicate, how they are structured, how they function over time and what non-illness related issues typically unbalance them. The course will focus on ways the social worker can rebalance families in the face of the chaos and unpredictability generated by illness.

SOWK 573. ALTERNATIVES IN HEALING: COMPLEMENTARY CARE IN SOCIAL WORK. 4 Credits.

This course examines the ways that people benefit from ancient and modern mind/body healing techniques that can help them deeply relax and draw upon inner strengths, alleviating much of the physical, emotional, cognitive and spiritual suffering associated with chronic or acute illness and dying.

SOWK 574. DEATH AND DYING. 4 Credits.

This course explores issues related to death, dying, grief and loss as well as their relevance and application to social work practice. The content draws from an interdisciplinary knowledge base and emphasizes the acquisition of practice skills. Topics include loss events throughout the life span; psychological and sociological theoretical perspectives in death, dying, grief and loss: social work practice models in grief, loss and coping with terminal illness; the impact of individual differences and cultural diversity on reactions to loss-related events; available resources for those dealing with these issues, and policy and ethical implications related to end-of-life care and decision making.

SOWK 575. ADVANCED SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE WITH CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS. 4 Credits.

Advanced practice strategies and techniques for current problems facing children, youth and families. Students will apply assessment paradigms to case situations and design appropriate intervention strategies based on contemporary practice theory. Direct practice knowledge and skills will be evaluated through experiential and written assignments.

SOWK 576. ADDICTION: A BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL APPROACH. 4 Credits.

This course applies the biopsychosocial perspective to the addiction field. The emphasis is on an examination of the reciprocal interaction between the individual experiencing addiction and the various systems that impact misuse, addiction, treatment and recovery. Topics will include harm reduction, the biology of addiction, the psychology of addiction, co-existing disorders and social aspects of addiction, including family risks and resilience, racial and ethnic issues, gender and sexual orientation, the nature of mutual help groups and public policy issues. The content of the course will draw heavily on current research and emphasize critical thinking and analysis of the current controversies in the addiction field. The overall framework of the course rests on the foundation of the strengths perspective and client-centered practices. Although alcohol and drug problems will be emphasized, the course will also address other related disorders, including eating disorders, pathological gambling and compulsive shopping.

SOWK 577. CLINICAL SOCIAL WORK ASSESSMENT. 4 Credits.

Examination of the assessment skills required for professional social work practice in mental health and other professional settings. Application of mental health diagnosis and clinical assessment techniques to case situations.

SOWK 579. GENDER AND SEXUAL ASSAULT. 4 Credits.

This course addresses contemporary concerns about sexual assault primarily, but not exclusively against women. Theories about the sociocultural context of gender socialization and other explanatory theories will provide a framework for understanding personal and societal responses to sexual violence. The course will survey all forms of sexual violence and discuss dynamics of trauma and recovery. Treatment approaches will be discussed as well as the importance of prevention and change strategies on both the personal and the societal level.

SOWK 580. FIELD PREPARATION. 1 Credit.

Notes: graded Pass No Credit.
Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of instructor.
This course serves as an introduction to field practicum and to a community agency setting. It provides the students with the necessary information, skills and practices to maximize their success in their field practicum.

SOWK 581. INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR I. 1 Credit.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit.
Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of MSW graduate director.
This seminar is the forum in which students share, compare and analyze their social work educational experience and participate in learning activities focused on application of curriculum content for the comprehensive exam. It is designed to assist in the integration process, to provide support for students in discussion of learning experiences and to engage students in utilizing course content to enhance their professional practice.

SOWK 582. INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR II. 1 Credit.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit.
Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of MSW graduate director.
This seminar is the forum in which students share, compare and analyze their social work educational experience and participate in learning activities focused on application of curriculum content for the comprehensive exam. It is designed to assist in the integration process, to provide support for students in discussion of learning experiences and to engage students in utilizing course content to enhance their professional practice.

SOWK 583. INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR III. 1 Credit.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit.
Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of MSW graduate director.
This seminar is the forum in which students share, compare and analyze their social work educational experience and participate in learning activities focused on application of curriculum content for the comprehensive exam. It is designed to assist in the integration process, to provide support for students in discussion of learning experiences and to engage students in utilizing course content to enhance their professional practice.

SOWK 584. INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR IV. 1 Credit.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit.
Pre-requisites: graduate standing in the MSW program or permission of MSW graduate director.
This seminar is the forum in which students share, compare and analyze their social work educational experience and participate in learning activities focused on application of curriculum content for the comprehensive exam. It is designed to assist in the integration process, to provide support for students in discussion of learning experiences and to engage students in utilizing course content to enhance their professional practice.

SOWK 596. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

SOWK 597. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: only one workshop course for up to 3 credits may be used to fulfill graduate degree requirements.

SOWK 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Students take intensive and independent study of some special area in social work or social welfare.

SOWK 600. THESIS. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Elective course.

SOWK 601. RESEARCH PROJECT. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Individually supervised research work.

SOWK 602. CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS AND EVIDENCE BASED TREATMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: SOWK 553 or currently enrolled in SOWK 561.
This course examines evidence-based treatments across the lifespan from a social work perspective, with a specific focus on the most common mental disorders and evidence-based treatments. Students will demonstrate application of the most current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and become critical consumers of evidence-based treatment research with diverse populations. The course emphasizes strengths and ecological systems perspectives, risk and resiliency factors, and the impact of biological, psychological, cultural, spiritual and other social factors.

SOWK 603. LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT IN HUMAN SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: SOWK 530 or SOWK 561.
This course is designed to expand students’ knowledge and understanding of human service organizations and to provide approaches for designing and managing human service programs effectively. Organizational and management theories and principles are applied to a range of human services. The course focuses on the knowledge, values and skills needed for successful leadership in creating a meaningful work environment, managing organizational outcomes, and engaging the community.

SOWK 671. ADVANCED PRACTICUM/SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit.
Pre-requisites: SOWK 571 or SOWK 561.
(A total of 13 credits distributed over three quarters for the full-time program and over five quarters for the part-time programs). Advanced Practicum/Seminar is a continuation of the Foundation Practicum/Seminar. Students in Advanced Practicum/Seminar will utilize the agency setting for integration of coursework knowledge and for the development of professional practice skills. The placement agency is the laboratory for the application of classroom learning. Practicum is a supervised experience which allows students to learn to use supervision as a professional development process and to receive feedback concerning their professional functioning. The seminar is the forum in which students share, compare and analyze the field experience and participate in learning activities focused on application of curriculum content to practice. It is designed to assist in the integration process to provide support for students in discussion of practice issues and learning experiences and to engage students in utilizing course content to enhance their professional practice.

SOWK 695. INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.