Philosophy Major, Bachelor of Arts (BA)

This is an archived copy of the 2015-2016 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ewu.edu.

Students may choose either the 45- or 60-credit major.

Notes:

  • two years of a single high school foreign language or one year of a single foreign language at college level is required for this major;
  • the 49 credit major requires completion of a minor.
Required Courses
PHIL 301INTRODUCTION TO FORMAL LOGIC5
PHIL 320HISTORY OF ANCIENT WESTERN PHILOSOPHY5
PHIL 321HISTORY OF MODERN WESTERN PHILOSOPHY5
PHIL 322HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY WESTERN PHILOSOPHY5
Capstone Requirement–select one of the following or any Senior Capstone with advisor's approval.4-5
Note: for students who select PHIL as a second major, the capstone requirement will be met by the completion of the primary major capstone.
PHILOSOPHY SENIOR CAPSTONE
INTERDISCIPLINARY SR CAPSTONE
Required Phillosophy Electives–select in consultation with a departmental advisor25
Note: no more than 15 credits may be taken in 200-level philosophy courses.
Total Credits49-50

Notes: 

  • two years of a single high school foreign language or one year of a single foreign language at college level is required for this major;
  • the 60 credit major does not require completion of a minor. 
Required Courses
PHIL 301INTRODUCTION TO FORMAL LOGIC5
PHIL 320HISTORY OF ANCIENT WESTERN PHILOSOPHY5
PHIL 321HISTORY OF MODERN WESTERN PHILOSOPHY5
PHIL 322HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY WESTERN PHILOSOPHY5
Capstone Requirement–choose one of the following or any Senior Capstone with your advisor's approval.4-5
Note: for students who select PHIL as a second major, the capstone requirement will be met by the completion of the primary major capstone.
PHILOSOPHY SENIOR CAPSTONE
INTERDISCIPLINARY SR CAPSTONE
Electives–choose 40 credits in philosophy in consultation with a departmental advisor.40
Note: no more than 15 credits may be taken in 200-level philosophy courses.
Total Credits64-65

Student Learning Outcomes—students will

  • critically analyze, using logic and other tools, the consistency and verifiability of their own beliefs and the beliefs of others, as well as engage in reasoned public deliberation challenging those beliefs;
  • understand the main doctrines and evaluate the arguments that underpin the ancient, modern, and contemporary periods of thought;
  • offer interpretations of the ideas of major philosophers by showing how they relate to perennial philosophical themes such as: visions of the good life, reality versus appearance, the roles of reason and experience, freedom and morality, etc;
  • apply methods for philosophical problem solving by (a) relating theory to practice, (b) evaluating ideas in terms of both generic or universal humanity and perspectival pluralism, and (c) applying normative standards of truth, value and beauty;
  • apply philosophical writing styles in writing assignments and research projects that are aimed at extending philosophical inquiry through argumentation and/or comparative studies.