Business Administration

This is an archived copy of the 2015-2016 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ewu.edu.

Department of Accounting and Information Systems & Business Analytics

Duanning Zhou, Chair
307 Riverpoint
509.828.1203

Department of Management

Dean Kiefer, Chair
363 Riverpoint
509.828.1206

Undergraduate Business Program

Karen Morley, Advisor
345 Patterson Hall
509.359.6277

Jodi Strote, Advisor
349 Riverpoint
509.828.1249


Faculty

Nancy J. Birch, Chu Chen, Jeffrey N. Culver, Arsen Djatej, Lei Dong, Xiaohong Fan, Jack H. Gambill, M. David Gorton, Chin Kuo, Susan L. Megaard, Elizabeth J. Tipton, Lei Wang.

Wensheng Cai, Heidi L. Connole, Vance Cooney, Larry Davis, Shanna Davis, Wendy M. Eager, David M. Eagle, Brian E. Grinder, Syed M. Jameel Hasan, Atsushi Inoue, Dean B. .Jr. Kiefer, Wanthanee Limpaphayom, Yanxin Liu, William Martin, Debra D. Morgan, Patricia L. Nemetz-Mills, Vincent J. Pascal, Stephen Shervais, Mohammad Abrahim Soleimani, Harm-Jan Steenhuis, Bruce T. Teague, David E. Terpstra, Goitom Tesfom Tsegay, Duanning Zhou.


Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration (BAB)

Undergraduate Minors


Undergraduate Programs

The College of Business and Public Administration at Eastern offers excellent business programs taught by a mix of research producing, terminally qualified faculty and practitioners who are deeply engaged in their professions.

The College is known for these strengths:
  • Business Administration degrees accredited by AACSB-International
  • classes which allow participation and personal attention
  • excellent computer systems and labs available to students
  • many opportunities to engage in practical research with professors
  • day and evening classes
  • internship opportunities

A solid theoretical foundation balanced with practical application is critical to being successful in business. Eastern Washington University’s business programs provide that balance, with emphasis on analysis, critical thinking and intellectual inquiry. An understanding of the economic, social, ethical and legal business environment—along with principles of accounting, finance, management, marketing, production and quantitative analysis, all taught from a global perspective—is part of all Eastern’s business programs.

Preparation Information for Business: The College of Business and Public Administration recognizes the importance of certain basic skills for a career in business. Students planning to enter a degree program in Business Administration are encouraged to prepare through courses in written and oral communications, mathematics and computer fundamentals. These skills will be further developed through coursework in the Business Administration curriculum. All Business Administration students are encouraged to enroll in BUED 302 Business Communication to supplement their communication skills.

Transferring Business Courses from Other Institutions: Eastern Washington University has articulated agreements with all community colleges in the state of Washington and with certain community colleges in Idaho, Montana and Oregon regarding the transferability of courses into four-year degree programs. Students planning on transferring from these schools are encouraged to consult with their community college counselor and with the Academic Advisors for Undergraduate Business Programs at EWU regarding transferability of courses in Business Administration.

Coursework of students transferring from other institutions of higher education is evaluated on a course-by-course basis to determine equivalence to EWU Business Administration courses. Students seeking a degree in Business Administration must complete a minimum of 50 percent of business credit hours required for the degree in residence at EWU. Additionally, students must complete a minimum of 50 percent of the required courses in the major at EWU. Students seeking a minor in Business Administration, Decision Science, International Business or Management Information Systems must complete a minimum of 12 credits in the minor at EWU.

It is the policy of the College of Business and Public Administration that students, once admitted to and pursuing a course of study at EWU in Business Administration, will take their required courses at EWU. A student wishing to take a course at another institution with the intention to transfer that course into his/her degree program at EWU must receive approval from either the Business Undergraduate Program Advisors (lower division courses) or the appropriate department chair (upper division courses).

Course Enrollment Policies: undergraduate Business Administration courses are offered under the following prefixes:

Business Administration
ACCTAccounting
BUEDBusiness/Marketing Education
DSCIDecision Science
FINCFinance
HUMRHuman Resource Management
MGMTManagement
MISCManagement Information Systems
MKTGMarketing
OPSMOperations Management
IBUSInternational Business
Education
BUEDBusiness/Marketing Education
CTEDCareer and Technical Education

Business Administration courses numbered 300 and above (with the exception of BUED 302, DSCI 346, MGMT 326, MKTG 310, FINC 335 and OPSM 330) are intended for students who either:

  1. are formally admitted to the BAB program or
  2. have post-baccalaureate standing and have completed the prerequisite courses or
  3. have formally declared majors in another degree program, have completed the prerequisite courses and have the appropriate clearances and class standing, and are taking the course for one of the following reasons:
    1. required for their major;
    2. required for their minor;
    3. fulfills a gecr, or International Studies requirement.

Students are also expected to satisfy course prerequisites as listed in this catalog. Students who do not meet one of the above criteria, or who have not satisfied course prerequisites, will be dropped from the course.

Required courses in the following programs of study may have prerequisites. Reference the course description section for clarification.

Admission Requirements for the College of Business and Public Administration Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration (BAB): The College of Business and Public Administration has specific requirements for formal admission into the Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration (BAB) degree program. These requirements must be met before continuation into upper division business courses. Contact the Academic Advisors for Undergraduate Business Programs for current requirements.

Grade Requirements for Graduation–Students seeking a BAB degree must achieve

  1. a minimum grade 2.0 in each course required for the major;
  2. formal admission to the BAB program;
  3. a minimum GPA 2.5 for all upper division Business Administration core courses as well as required and elective courses taken to fulfill requirements for the major area.

Students seeking a minor in Accounting, Business Administration, Business Analytics, Data Analytics, International Business or Management Information Systems must achieve a minimum grade ≥2.0 in each course that fulfills a requirement for the minor.

Course Repeat Policy

The Undergraduate Business Program's course repeat policy limits students to three graded attempts for each requirement for their business major or minor, including all requirements listed on the business administration core and business classes required for the major or minor. If a requirement for the major or minor is not successfully completed with a minimum grade 2.0 on the third graded attempt, the student will be dropped from the program.

For fulfillment of each course requirement, the business program will consider the first three times a student completes the course; further attempts of the course will not be accepted. In accordance with EWU’s repeat policy, only the most recent of the (first) three completions will be accepted. Completion is defined as receiving a final grade in the course.

A student who has been denied admission to the business program or who has been dropped from the program based on application of this policy may seek admission into the program or continuation through petition to the Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration.

The policy applies to all business program core, major and minor requirements and includes graded attempts of these requirements at colleges and universities other than EWU. For the specific requirements, refer to the General Undergraduate Catalog or the Business Advising website.

It is anticipated that enforcement of the policy will not be handled automatically by the student information system but will require review of transcripts at the time of admission to the business program and/or review of transcript/graduation forms just prior to graduation. Information as to the policy and the student’s obligation to understand and follow it will be included on program advising information and admission forms and in EWU catalog information.

When a student declares business administration as a degree program, the student will be informed of this policy by the business advisor. If a student applying for formal admission to the business program has completed a business program requirement a third time with a grade <2.0, the student will be informed by the business advisor that the student is not admissible and that further attempts of the course will not be considered. If a student has been formally admitted to the business program and then completes a business program requirement a third time with a grade <2.0, the student will be dropped from the program and informed by the business advisor that further attempts of the course will not be considered. (Go to www.ewu.edu/businessadvising for details.)

Assessment Requirement

The Comp–XM Exam will be administered as part of the MGMT 490 business capstone course. It will serve to assess student learning goals relative to the fundamental knowledge of the core business disciplines as well as the students’ ability to integrate their knowledge to arrive at informed decisions

Program Location

The Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration (BAB) is offered at four locations: at Eastern’s main campus in Cheney, EWU Spokane at the Riverpoint Campus, in Bellevue at Bellevue College and Longview at Lower Columbia College. All Business Administration Core courses are available at all locations.The following majors are available:

Cheney Campus and EWU Spokane
  • Accounting, Professional
  • Finance
  • International Business
  • Management
  • Management Information Systems
  • Marketing
Bellevue and Longview
  • Management

Support services, including registration and advising from both the Undergraduate Program Advisor for Business and from faculty members, is available at three locations.

Degree Requirements for Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration

All students seeking a degree in Business Administration must complete the Business Administration Core plus courses for at least one major.

Graduate Degrees


Graduate Programs

Roberta Brooke, Director
EWU Spokane,
668 N. Riverpoint
Spokane WA 99202-1677
509.828.1248

The Master of Business Administration is an advanced professional degree in business administration emphasizing quantitative and qualitative skills necessary for leadership in today’s organizational environment. It prepares students for management positions in business firms, government agencies and not-for-profit entities. Organizations need leaders who can work well in group situations, appreciate the value of diversity, foster creativity and innovation, create an entrepreneurial spirit and provide practical solutions to real-world problems. Managers today are faced with complex global problems and a rapidly changing business environment, so they must have an appreciation for lifelong learning. The MBA at Eastern Washington University is designed to equip graduates with required skills, knowledge and abilities to flourish in a complex organizational environment.

Accreditation

Graduate programs in business began in 1966 and the Master of Business Administration (MBA) was authorized in 1975. Both the graduate and undergraduate business programs are accredited by AACSB-International.

Admission Requirements/Preparation

To be admitted to the MBA, an applicant must hold a four-year baccalaureate degree in any field of specialization from an accredited college or university. An applicant’s qualifications will be assessed though the quality of performance in prior academic programs as well as general aptitude measured by the GMAT or GRE. Other integral factors in the decision making process include work experience, résumé and letter of intent.

Admission will be considered only after all of the following documents have been received from the applicant:

  1. the application for admission to a graduate program at Eastern Washington University;
  2. two copies of official transcripts for all collegiate work completed;
  3. official GMAT scores or GRE scores (no more than five years old);
  4. a $50 MBA application fee, in addition to the $50 graduate application fee;
  5. statement of intent demonstrating a level of knowledge and intellectual maturity appropriate to the MBA;
  6. other information which may be required at the discretion of the MBA program director may include the following:
    • admissions interview;
    • a current résumé;
    • references;
    • an essay demonstrating critical thinking skills.

In addition to the above requirements, international students must demonstrate English language competency by taking the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 92 Internet-based Test (TOEFL iBT) or 580 paper-based TOEFL is required to be considered for MBA Program admission. (7.0 International English Language Test (IELTS) is also accepted)

Note: admission to the MBA foundation coursework requires a TOEFL of at least 71 iBT or 525 paper-based TOEFL or 6.0 IELTS.

All of the above materials should be sent directly to:

Graduate Programs Office
206 Showalter Hall
Cheney, WA 99004–2444

MBA Program Admission Exception Policy

The MBA Program admission exception policy is an alternate admission process. The MBA director will consider applications from students requesting an exception to the minimum admission criteria of an application GPA ≥3.0 and a 450 GMAT or GRE equivalent. In order to be considered for exception students must submit a letter of appeal and a current résumé and must possess an index score (GPA x 200 + GMAT) of at least 1050. The director will review the applications throughout the year and will consult with the MBA Curriculum Committee as necessary. Admission exceptions will be recommended by the director.

Letters of appeal for admission exception should include the following information:

  • why you want the Master of Business Administration degree?
  • why you feel that you are capable of successfully completing this degree?
  • anything else you feel the MBA committee should know.

Application Deadlines

Eastern admits MBA students throughout the academic year. The Graduate Programs Office accepts applications no later than 10 business days before the start of the term of intended enrollment. Applicants must make an appointment with the MBA program director before they begin the program. During that interview the applicant will be advised about program details, schedules and any foundation requirements that must be completed before starting the advanced program. Applicants will be advised by letter from the Graduate Programs Office concerning the admission decision.

Mathematics and Communications Skills Required

The MBA program requires competency on the part of the student in quantitative skills, computer skills and written and oral communication skills. Students lacking these skills are urged to acquire them before applying for admission to the program. Courses in finite mathematics, computer literacy and oral and written communications are stressed as necessary preparation. Courses in differential calculus are highly recommended.

Computers and Research

The courses of the MBA curriculum have been infused with the application of computer technology in managerial decision-making. In addition, MBA students may expect that the courses will require considerable research beyond assigned course texts. Eastern offers computer labs and computer access to nationwide data banks. MBA students also have access to the John F. Kennedy library on the Cheney campus and the Riverpoint Campus library system on the Riverpoint Campus in Spokane.

Academic Requirements

Students in the MBA program must maintain a GPA≥3.0 at all times. Students who fall below a GPA 3.0 are notified by the Graduate Programs Office that they are officially on probation. These graduate students will be allowed one quarter’s study to restore their cumulative GPA to >3.0 level.

The MBA Curriculum Committee of the College of Business and Public Administration may extend this probationary period by one quarter when they feel such an extension is warranted by special circumstances. Those students who are unable to restore their cumulative GPA to 3.0 in this additional quarter of probation will be terminated from the program.

No course grade <2.5 may count toward the MBA degree. Only two courses in the student’s program may be <3.0. Students who have more than two grades <3.0 are subject to dismissal from the program and will be notified by the MBA program director.

Students who are dismissed for academic reasons may appeal to the MBA Curriculum Committee. The committee may allow students to repeat up to two courses in which they received a grade <3.0. The average of the original grade and the grade earned by repeating must be 3.0. A given course can be repeated only once. If the average grade is still <3.0, no further remedy is available and the average grade counts.

With readmission granted through appeal students must maintain these same academic standards; however, if they again fall below these standards they will be dismissed and no further appeal remedy will be available to them. Students who are not recommended for continuation must wait one year to reapply for admission to graduate studies.

Students are expected to successfully complete courses for which they register. Thus, the record of any student with more than two W (withdrawal) or X (incomplete) course grades will also be reviewed by the MBA program director, with termination from the program as a possible consequence.

Other graduate academic requirements are set forth in the opening section of the catalog under Graduate Studies Academic Policies. Entering MBA students will be apprised of these regulations at their initial interview with the MBA program director following admission to the program.

The student has the right of appeal to the MBA Curriculum Committee on any actions taken under these grade standards and the probation process. According to university policy, the student also has the right to appeal individual grades.

In the event that a student is dismissed from the program twice as a result of these rules, readmission will not be permitted.

Advising and Special Counseling

All entering students should consult with the director of the MBA program for program information and determination of the student’s interests. The director recommends a program of study compatible with each student’s goals and interests and the MBA program requirements.

Reserved Classes

MBA courses at EWU are reserved exclusively for students who have been formally admitted to the MBA program or other master’s degree programs and who have met all prerequisites for the courses or who have permission of the MBA program director.

Study Groups

Managers interact and so do MBA students. The MBA program makes use of group study, analysis and presentation. Students are frequently assigned to teams of three, four or five or more individuals. Assignments are sometimes based upon assembling a team with diverse academic and work experience backgrounds. Teams are expected to prepare and present many assignments collaboratively.

Working in a group is good reinforcement of management practice, helping to develop interpersonal skills and effectiveness in small group decision-making. Group members begin to understand and appreciate others’ points of view. Study groups also reinforce the managerial technique of networking. Successful managers often draw upon resources from individuals outside the organizations they serve.

Practical Business Experience

All students who graduate from the MBA program should have some practical work experience. The majority of the students accepted into the program are working professionals and meet this requirement. For those students who enter the program lacking professional work experience, an internship should be part of the student’s MBA program. Up to four (4) credits earned while in an internship may be used for MBA elective credit.

Degree Candidacy

No more than one-half of the minimum number of credits in the advanced program may be counted toward the MBA degree before the total program is planned and the application for degree candidacy is submitted.

Major Field Test (MFT) Requirement

Students are required to take the MFT for the MBA before completing their MBA Capstone course. For more information on the MFT, see www.ewu.edu/cbpa/mft-assessment. The MBA application fee covers the cost of this test fee. In the case where a student must retake the exam due to a failed first attempt they will be reassessed the cost of the test.

Oral Examination Requirement

Those students electing a BADM 600 Thesis or a BADM 601 Research Report will present and defend the results of their research to an oral examination committee chaired by the thesis or research project advisor, with a second member from the College of Business and Public Administration and a faculty member from an area outside their discipline. The Graduate Programs Office will select this member. These students will schedule their orals at times mutually convenient to them and the three committee members.

Course Schedules and Time Limits

MBA courses are conducted in the evenings at EWU Spokane. Evening classes are held one night per week from 6 to 9:40 p.m. Three-fourths of the minimum credits required for the MBA degree (at least 36 credits) must be earned in Eastern Washington University resident courses. The remaining credits may consist of approved Eastern extension credits or approved residence or extension credits from other accredited institutions, provided they meet the advisor-approved program.

The MBA program must be completed within six years after the first applicable advanced course has been undertaken. The minimum time to degree for a full-time student is one year (four quarters). Most courses are 4 credit hours. The maximum allowable load is 16 credit hours. MBA students who are employed usually carry no more than 8 credits (two courses).

Visiting Graduate Students

Visiting graduate students may enroll in MBA program courses on a space-available basis, provided they have delivered to the MBA program director documentary proof from their home institution that they are bona fide graduate students in good standing and that their home institution will accept Eastern’s courses as part of their degree program. Such documentation shall be in the form of a letter signed by a home institution official and addressed to Eastern’s MBA program director. In order to register and have their coursework recorded on an EWU graduate transcript, visiting graduate students must submit a graduate non-degree seeking application to the Graduate Programs Office at least 10 business days before the start of the term of intended enrollment.

Affiliated Programs

International Dual Degree Program–MBA/MA in International Business and Economics

A dual-degree program is available in cooperation with the University of Applied Sciences in Schmalkalden, Germany. This program combines the EWU M.B.A. and a Master’s in International Business and Economics from the University of Applied Sciences (FhS) in Schmalkalden, Germany. This opportunity allows a student to earn two master’s degrees in an accelerated schedule of studies. All coursework is taught in English.

EWU students will take the entire MBA curriculum at EWU plus study abroad for one semester at FhS. They will begin a thesis at FhS and finish it after returning to EWU.

The FhS MA degree requires a total of 120 European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) credits. Students will transfer 40–48 EWU MBA credits to FhS, or the equivalent of 60 European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) credits. These transfer credits will be applied toward the MA degree.

In addition, they will take 30 ECTS credits (the equivalent of 24 EWU credits) of coursework at FhS plus write an FhS thesis for another 30 ECTS credits, thus acquiring the necessary 120 ECTS credits for the MA degree.

Students will present and defend the results of their thesis to an oral examination committee chaired by the thesis or research project advisor from the FhS according to their guidelines. A faculty member from the College of Business and Public Administration and a EWU faculty member from an area outside their discipline will be required. The Graduate Programs Office will select this member. The oral exam will be conducted at EWU and include video conferencing with the Schmalkalden faculty members. These students will schedule their orals at times mutually convenient to them and the committee members.

MBA60
FhS coursework30
FhS thesis30
Total Credits120

Satisfactory completion (including a 60 minute oral examination for the thesis) will result in the awarding of a M.A. (International Business and Economics) degree from FhS.)

Required Core EWU MBA Coursework
BADM 515MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS4
BADM 520ADVANCED DATA MODELING FOR BUSINESS RESEARCH4
BADM 530CORPORATE FINANCE4
BADM 540MARKETING MANAGEMENT4
BADM 552LEADERSHIP AND ETHICS4
BADM 555STRATEGIC OPERATIONS4
BADM 560DECISION MAKING AND ACCOUNT INFORMATION4
BADM 570INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND THE ORGANIZATION4
BADM 580INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ENVIRONMENTS4
BADM 590MBA CAPSTONE4
Total Credits40
Sample of Coursework Offered at FhS

Note: Courses are subject to changes. Specific coursework to be completed will be specified by the program directors and may result in the need to take additional credits beyond the minimum requirements above.

Accounting
Investment Appraisal (ECTS winter)8
Management Control Systems (ECTS summer)5
Advanced Economics
Institutional Economics (ECTS summer)5
Labour Economics (ECTS winter)5
Managerial Economics (ECTS summer)5
Regional Economics (ECTS summer)5
Computer-Based Analysis
Econometrics (ECTS winter)8
Experimental Econometrics (ECTS winter)6
Marketing Research (ECTS summer)6
International Economics
International Financial Markets and Portfolio Selection Theory (ECTS winter)6
International and European Economic Law (ECTS winter)5
International Monetary Economics (ECTS winter)5
Management
Organisational Behaviour (ECTS winter)6
Philosophy
Economic Philosophy (ECTS summer)5
Political Philosophy (ECTS winter)5
Philosophy of Science (ECTS summer)5
Strategic and International
Human Resource Management (ECTS summer)6
Strategic and International Marketing (ECTS winter)6
Treasuring (ECTS winter)6

Dual MBA/MPA Degree Program

A dual-degree program is available with the Master of Public Administration (MPA) program. This dual-degree program combines the requisite supervisory and administrative education for career advancement in either the public or private sectors and bridges the regulatory and supplier aspects of business and government relationships.

Those enrolling in the dual-degree program must be admitted through the Graduate Programs Office and by both the MBA program and the graduate program in Public Administration (MPA). The student also must have satisfied the undergraduate background (prerequisite) course requirements of both programs at the time of entry or soon thereafter.

Students interested in the specific requirements of this dual-degree program must contact either the MPA program director at 509.828.1231 or the MBA program director at 509.828.1248 to be advised in advance of consideration for admission.

Subjects codes: Accounting (ACCT) , Business Administration (BADM) , Decision Science (DSCI) , Finance (FINC) , Human Resource Management (HUMR) , International Business (IBUS) , Management (MGMT) , Management Information Systems (MISC) , Marketing (MKTG) , Operations Management (OPSM)


Accounting Courses


ACCT 197. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 2 Credits.

ACCT 251. PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: sophomore standing.
Introduction to the underlying principles of financial accounting and the application of such data to financial decisions.

ACCT 252. PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ACCT 251.
Introduces the principles and techniques of managerial accounting. Emphasizes the use of information outputs from the managerial accounting information system in making managerial decisions.

ACCT 261. BUSINESS LAW. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: sophomore standing.
Law as it applies to the business world. Explores background of our system of legal process. Examines law and its social environment and its impact on business organizations and transactions.

ACCT 299. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-10 Credits.

ACCT 351. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I. 4 Credits.

Notes: ACCT 351, ACCT 352, ACCT 353 are sequential and cannot be taken out of order or concurrently.
Pre-requisites: ACCT 251.
Financial accounting principles and practice: postulates and principles underlying the presentation and interpretation of financial statements, including: working capital, investments, plant assets, long-term liabilities, partnership formation, partnership dissolution and stockholders’ equity.

ACCT 352. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II. 4 Credits.

ACCT 353. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING III. 4 Credits.

ACCT 356. COST ACCOUNTING I. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: completion of CPLA 100 and CPLA 101 or CPLA 120; completion of a math course that satisfies math proficiency (MATH 200 is highly recommended), ACCT 251, ACCT 252, DSCI 245, junior standing.
Cost determination and control: cost accounting theory and accounting for manufacturing operations. Emphasis on historic and standard costs, standard cost variance determination, budgeting and cost allocation.

ACCT 357. COST ACCOUNTING II. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ACCT 356.
Cost analysis and control principles and methods applied to manufacturing operations and decision making; applications of information theory to cost accounting reports and decision making; applications of information theory to cost accounting reports and decision processes.

ACCT 358. ACCOUNTING FOR NON-PROFIT ENTITIES. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ACCT 251.
Concepts, principles and procedures of fund accounting and accounting for not-for-profit entities. Emphasis on accounting principles and budgetary control, financial reporting and auditing for effective financial administration of governmental and other non-profit entitites.

ACCT 359. ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ACCT 351, ACCT 356, and MISC 211.
This course covers the application of concepts and techniques for the design, function, separation and evaluation of accounting systems. The course also focuses on accounting system design and evaluation in providing timely information along with problems in accounting-system installation and revision.

ACCT 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

ACCT 422. ADVANCED BUSINESS LAW. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ACCT 261; senior standing.
Business ethics and social responsibility; public law and regulation including securities law, antitrust law, consumer law, labor law, and debtor/creditor relations.

ACCT 450. AUDITING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ACCT 353, ACCT 356, ACCT 359.
Generally accepted auditing standards and principles; auditing objectives and methodology; ethical responsibility of the C.P.A. in financial reporting and auditing.

ACCT 451. ADVANCED AUDITING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ACCT 450.
Special topics in auditing with emphasis on EDP and statistical auditing. Auditing objectives, methodology, and generally accepted auditing standards as they relate to EDP and statistical auditing. Practical audit experience through hands-on computer use on audit cases.

ACCT 452. CONTEMPORARY ACCOUNTING THEORY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ACCT 353, ACCT 356 and ACCT 359.
This course covers contemporary accounting issues and their theoretical implications; review of accounting literature and research studies and pronouncements of the FASB and other professional organizations.

ACCT 453. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING. 4 Credits.

Selected special topics in financial accounting. Emphasis on financial accounting theory for partnerships, corporate combinations, and other selected advanced topics in financial accounting. Study of official pronouncements and major literature in the above areas.

ACCT 454. FEDERAL INCOME TAX I. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ACCT 251.
Provisions and principles of federal income tax laws affecting the determination of taxable income, tax liability and tax planning for individuals.

ACCT 455. FEDERAL INCOME TAX II. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ACCT 454.
Provisions and principles of federal income tax laws affecting the determination of taxable income and tax liability of corporations and information returns and tax planning for partnerships.

ACCT 456. FEDERAL INCOME TAX III. 4 Credits.

Special topics in federal income taxation. Emphasis on tax research and planning. Designed for specialists in tax work. Technical aspects of taxation - estates, trust, pension and profit-sharing plans, foreign income/foreign taxpayers and audits - tax fraud, rules of evidence and ethics of tax practice.

ACCT 495. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

ACCT 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

ACCT 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

ACCT 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.


Business Administration Courses


BADM 500. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS. 4 Credits.

Notes: not open to those who have completed ECON 200 and ECON 201.
This course does not count toward the MBA degree without permission of the MBA Director. This is an accelerated course in micro- and macroeconomic principles, including these topics: functioning of a price system, supply and demand, forms of markets, theory of factor income, market interventions by government, macroeconomic measurements, determinants of national income and output, effects of monetary and fiscal policy and long-term growth.

BADM 503. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS IN BUSINESS. 4 Credits.

Notes: this course does not count toward the MBA degree without permission of the MBA Director.
Pre-requisites: permission of the MBA director.
An accelerated course in descriptive and inferential statistics, including basic regression analysis, chi-square analysis and quality control methodology.

BADM 505. ESSENTIALS OF ACCOUNTING. 4 Credits.

Notes: this course does not count toward the MBA degree without permission of the MBA Director.
Pre-requisites: permission of the MBA director.
An accelerated course in understanding and using accounting information and accounting information systems in a business environment: includes coverage of both financial and managerial accounting information.

BADM 515. MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS. 4 Credits.

This course is a study of economic theory and its specific applications to the manager’s decision-making.

BADM 520. ADVANCED DATA MODELING FOR BUSINESS RESEARCH. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the MBA director or admission to the MBA program.
A study of business research methodology, including basic measurement desgin and the application of statistical analysis in an applied practical business setting.

BADM 530. CORPORATE FINANCE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the MBA Director, or both of the following: admission to the MBA Program and completion of BADM 515 and BADM 560.
This course covers an analysis of valuation issues and project analysis as well as the relationship between risk, capital structure, cost of capital and dividend policy. It examines contemporary issues and problems confronting financial managers.

BADM 539. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: some sections are graded Pass/No Credit.
Electives are designed to (1) help students enhance functional business skills by providing an in-depth study of a selected topic from a business core area and (2) expose students to a variety of environments in which business decision making skills are applied, such as international or not-for-profit organizations and/or specific industires, such as health care or service industries. The topics of specific BADM 539 courses offered each quarter are determined by a combination of student and faculty interest and availability.

BADM 540. MARKETING MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the MBA director, or both of the following: admission to the MBA program and completion of BADM 520.
This course is a study of both the theoretical and applied aspects of the marketing process. It covers the elements of successful marketing strategies, marketing decision-making and the impact of marketing on business.

BADM 541. MANAGERIAL COMMUNICATIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the MBA program and completion of the MBA foundation or permission of the MBA director.
This course is designed to refine the student's written, oral, and electronic communications skills as applied to the managerial environment within the organization.

BADM 543. LABOR RELATIONS. 2 Credits.

Cross listed: PADM 543.
This course covers a broad range of topics such as history of the labor movement, federal and state statutes covering this field, emergency operations planning and legislative lobbying efforts.

BADM 545. COLLECTIVE BARGAINING. 2 Credits.

Cross listed: PADM 545.
This course addresses the process of reaching atreement on a contract.

BADM 552. LEADERSHIP AND ETHICS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the MBA Director, or both of the following: admission to the MBA Program and completion of BADM 520.
This course inquires as to leaders and leadership from a perspective of ethics. It asks the student to think about principled leaership through three complex lenses: personal character, accountability, and pragmatism (ethical action in an uncertain, competitive, and imperfect world). Each of these lenses reflects traditions in moral philosophy and each emphasizes fundamental aspects of leaders' responsibilities. The objective of the course is an integrated understanding of the relationship between ethics and leadership achieved through study of the leader.

BADM 555. STRATEGIC OPERATIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the MBA Director, or all of the following: admission to the MBA Program and completion of BADM 520, 530, 540.
This course is a study of business operations practice - including production technology transfer, cause-and-effect for operations problems, operations strategies and action plans - and their applications to managerial decision making.

BADM 560. DECISION MAKING AND ACCOUNT INFORMATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the MBA Director, or admission to the MBA Program.
This course focuses on the use of accounting information and accounting information systems in business decision-making.

BADM 564. E-COMMERCE. 4 Credits.

Electronic commerce includes not only selling/buying online but also much more broad activities, such as organizational internal processes supports, electronic collaboration among partners, distance learning, and virtual communities. This course explores how the landscape of E-Commerce is changing and evolving. It covers the important topics of E-Commerce, including selling and marketing online, businesses trading and collaborating with other businesses, internal business process supports, legal, ethical and tax issues. Web security, E-Commerce infrastructure, etc. The course balances the strategic and technological aspects of successful E-Commerce with real-world business cases. This course also introduces the latest technological developments which will significantly impact the current and future E-Commerce, such as wireless technology, RFID (radio frequency identification) GDSN (global data synchronization network), EPC global Network, etc.

BADM 570. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND THE ORGANIZATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the MBA Director or admission to the MBA Program.
This course analyzes the concepts and techniques underlying the development and control of informations systems within the firm. It covers the impact of emergent information technologies on strategic planning and emphasizes computer-based management information systems.

BADM 577. ENTREPRENEURSHIP. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the MBA director or admission to the MBA program.
This course is designed to provide the student a rigorous experience in not only learning about global entrepreneurship, but also in developing a business plan for either their own existing firm or a start-up opportunity. While not a capstone course it does require the student to utilize previously learned information that can be incorporated in the business plan. Verbal and oral communication, as well as Internet based communication and searching, are of import in this course.

BADM 580. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ENVIRONMENTS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the MBA Director, or both of the following: admission to the MBA Program and completion of BADM 520 (may be concurrent).
This course provides an overview of the roles of business in the global economic, political, social and other environments in which businesses operate.

BADM 585. STRATEGY, COMPETITIVENESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the MBA Director.
The MOC course is based on materials developed by the Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness at Harvard Business School. The MOC course explores the determinants of competitiveness and successful economic development viewed from a bottom-up, microeconomic perspective. While sound macroeconomic policies, stable legal and political institutions, and improving social conditions create the potential for competitiveness, wealth is actually created at the microeconomic level. The sophistication and productivity of firms, the vitality of clusters, and the quality of the business environment in which competition takes place, are the ultimate determinants of a nation's or region's productivity.

BADM 590. MBA CAPSTONE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the MBA Director or both of the following: admission to the MBA Program and completion of all other core classes.
The study of administrative processes under conditions of uncertainty including integrating analyses and policy determinations at the overall management level. Includes a synthesis of the principles of administrative management from the generalist's view and integrates prior specialized instruction in the basic functions of business and management. Provides an opportunity to develop a capacity for analyzing problems on a broad company-wide basis.

BADM 596. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

BADM 598. GRADUATE SEMINAR. 2-4 Credits.

BADM 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 2-4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

BADM 600. THESIS. 2-8 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Independent research study under the direction of a graduate advisory committee.

BADM 601. RESEARCH REPORT. 2-8 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Independent research resulting in a scholarly paper under the direction of the student's gradute committee chairperson.

BADM 603. FINAL PROJECT. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: must attempt completion of MFT and receive a score less than the minimum score of 240.
An individual advanced praxis project in which students, following the guidelines provided by the MBA program with the advice and editorial review of the chair of their comprehensive oral exam committee, develop a portfolio which is presented and discussed as part of the comprehensive oral exam for the MBA degree.

BADM 695. INTERNSHIP. 2-4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

BADM 696. COLLEGE TEACHING INTERNSHIP. 2-4 Credits.

Teaching a lower-division college course under supervision of a regular faculty member. Includes course planning, arranging bibliographical and instructional aids, conferences with students, experience in classroom instruction and student course evaluation.


Decision Science Courses


DSCI 245. DATA ANALYSIS FOR BUSINESS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: completion of CPLA 100 and 101 or CPLA 120 and one of the following: MATH 142, MATH 161 or MATH 200.
An introduction to decision making in the business environment using statistical and data analysis procedures. Computer software is used extensively. Written communication skills are emphasized as a means to incorporate analysis results into the decision making process. Topical coverage includes discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing.

DSCI 297. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

DSCI 299. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

DSCI 346. ADVANCED DATA ANALYSIS FOR BUSINESS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: completion of CPLA 100 and CPLA 101 or CPLA 120 and DSCI 245 (or equivalent) and one of the following: MATH 142, MATH 161 or MATH 200.
This course offers and in-depth study of decision making in the business environment using statistical and data analysis procedures. Statistical methods used in decision making include chi-square tests, analysis of variance, correlation, simple and multiple regression, time series analysis, and forecasting. Computer software is used extensively for both analysis and presentation. Case studies or projects are used to integrate statistical methods with problem solving and communication skills.

DSCI 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

DSCI 445. INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS ANALYTICS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: DSCI 346 or equivalent.
Business analytics is a hybrid of information systems, applied statistics, management science, data analysis, operations research, consumer behavior, risk management and decision support. The focus of this particular course is on the analysis of data to develop spreadsheet decision models in a business environment. Topics may include linear programming, network modeling, goal programming, nonlinear programming, regression, data mining, forecasting, simulation, queuing theory and decision analysis.

DSCI 446. BUSINESS FORECASTING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: DSCI 346 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.
Integrates several forecasting models with applications to managerial techniques. Topics include regression, multiple regression, time series analysis, autocorrelation, econometric models, exponential smoothing, autoregressive models, adaptive filtering, Box Jenkins methods, and survey techniques. The computer is employed to develop meaningful forecasts for management.

DSCI 447. DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: DSCI 346 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.
An in-depth study of quantitative business analysis techniques in a variety of organizational environments. Emphasizes the use of the computer and a discussion of quality in the organizational setting.

DSCI 448. BUSINESS SIMULATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: DSCI 346 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.
An examination of probabilistic robabilistic models in decision science, with emphasis on discrete event simulation.

DSCI 449. MULTIVARIATE DATA ANALYSIS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: DSCI 346 or equivalent.
Multivariate data analysis methods are used in fields such as business, engineering, education, data mining and many others. This course examines the concepts and principles of the various statistical methods used in the analysis of multiple simultaneous measurements on the subjects under investigation. Software is heavily used to support the studies in this course.

DSCI 450. DATA VISUALIZATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: DSCI 346 or equivalent.
Data visualization helps people understand the information within data by placing it in a visual context. As statistical results are often communicated poorly in the media, in scientific journals and in business, this course examines methods used in the presentation of these results to non-statistically oriented audiences. A variety of software packages are used to develop appropriate data visualizations. Non-technical writing and presentation skills are emphasized.

DSCI 495. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

DSCI 498. SEMINAR. 1-15 Credits.

DSCI 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.


Finance Courses


FINC 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

FINC 200. PERSONAL FINANCE: PHILOSOPHY AND PRACTICE. 4 Credits.

Satisfies: GECR for humanities and fine arts, list 3, philosophy and reasoning.
Deals with the management of individual financial affairs on both a practical and a philosophical level. Covers a number of topics, such as the relationship between money and success, money and power, the meaning of poverty, the illusion of value, budgeting, tax planning, credit, real estate, major purchases, cash management, insurance, investments and retirement planning.

FINC 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

FINC 299. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

FINC 335. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: (MATH 142 MATH 161 or MATH 200) and DSCI 245 and ACCT 251 and (either ECON 200 or ECON 201) and the university computer literacy requirement.
This course covers the application of basic theory and analytical techniques to financial decision making. It discusses the time value of money and capital budgeting, as well as capital structure and risk return trade off as they relate to the cost of capital, securities valuation and capital budgeting.

FINC 395. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

FINC 398. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

FINC 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

FINC 431. INVESTMENTS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: FINC 335.
Examines principles of investments valuation; objectives and risks involved; sources of relevant information. Security analysis and investment timing in a portfolio management framework.

FINC 432. RISK MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: FINC 434.
This course examines risks faced by the economy and businesses. Discussions include the principles of risk and risk management methods.

FINC 433. SECURITIES ANALYSIS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: FINC 431.
This course examines the data and techniques used to evaluate equity securities for investment purposes. Both the fundamental and technical approaches to analysis and evaluation are covered in depth. A complete analysis of a currently traded security is required.

FINC 434. FINANCIAL DERIVATIVES. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: FINC 335
Provides an in-depth background to various financial derivatives including futures, options, swaps, securitized securities, and collateralized mortgage obligations. Discusses concepts related to the operation of financial derivatives including marketing to market and clearing corporations.

FINC 435. CAPITAL BUDGETING AND LONG-TERM FINANCING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: FINC 335.
Provides in-depth background and skill development for capital budgeting and long-term financial decision-making. Emphasis on discounted cash flow analysis using computer spreadsheets. Discusses capital structure, dividend policy, cost of capital, and risk analysis. Also covers long-term financing issues of a business or corporation. Uses cases, computer simulations and other analytical techniques.

FINC 436. SHORT-TERM FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: FINC 335.
Provides necessary background and skill development to understand and analyze short-term financing issues. Topics include financial liquidity, working capital management, cash forecasting, cash budgeting and short-term investing and financing. Cases, spreadsheets and other methods are used extensively.

FINC 438. ENTREPRENEURIAL AND SMALL BUSINESS FINANCE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: FINC 335.
Cases, spreadsheets and other analytical methods are applied to issues and problems in entrepreneurial and small business finance. Specific topics include the sources and sequencing of financing as the business develops, assessing, forecasting and managing short-term and long-term capital needs, developing a financial plan to match the business plan, and valuing the business from the investors' viewpoint.

FINC 439. CURRENT TOPICS IN FINANCE. 4 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated for credit if topics differ.
Pre-requisites: FINC 435.
Individual reports, team projects, team presentations and class discussion are used to examine current issues and problems in finance, business and the global economy.

FINC 441. PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT I. 2 Credits.

Prerequsite: FINC 335. This is an introductory course dealing with the management of real dollar portfolios. Students enrolled in this course will be expected to enroll in FINC442 and FINC443 subsequent quarter. Topics covered include modern portfolio theory, security analysis and valuation, and portfolio performance evaluation. Students will also be involved in management of extant portfolios primarily as observers.

FINC 442. PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT II. 2 Credits.

Prerequsite: FINC 441. This course is a continuation of FINC441. Students enrolled in this class will be involved in the day-to-day management of real dollar portfolios. Responsibilities will include presentation of security recommendations, portfolio rebalancing, and analysis of portfolio risk. An end of quarter report will be prepared and presented.

FINC 443. PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT III. 2 Credits.

Prerequsite: FINC 442. This course is a continuation of the information covered in FINC441 and FINC442. Students enrolled in this class will be involved in the day-to-day management of real dollar portfolios. Responsibilities will include presentation of security recommendations, portfolio rebalancing, and analysis of portfolio risk. An end of quarter report will be prepared and presented.

FINC 474. INTERNATIONAL FINANCE MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: IBUS 474.
Pre-requisites: FINC 335.
This course discusses financial management in the international arena.

FINC 495. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

FINC 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-15 Credits.

FINC 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

FINC 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.


Human Resource Management Courses


HUMR 298. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

HUMR 299. DIR STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

HUMR 328. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing.
Human resource management (HRM) is an ongoing process consisting of various critical functions including human resource planning, recruitment, selection, training and development, job analysis, performance appraisal, compensation and health and safety. These major HRM functions and their sequential interdependence are discussed and applied. Various external forces that constrain managerial decision-making are also considered including laws and regulations dealing with equal opportunity, workplace diversity and multiculturalism, especially as these impact human resource policies and practices.

HUMR 395. INTERNSHIP. 1-10 Credits.

HUMR 399. DIR STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

HUMR 427. COMPENSATION ADMINISTRATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HUMR 328.
Part I consists of an analysis of the theoretical concepts, practical techniques, and criteria commonly recognized in the development and control of various compensation models. Part II is the application (field study) of selected concepts, techniques, and criteria considered appropriate for the solutions to local work place compensation problems.

HUMR 429. CURRENT ISSUES IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HUMR 328.
Analyses of selected major problems confronted in human resource management.

HUMR 495. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

HUMR 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

HUMR 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.


International Business Courses


IBUS 470. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: MGMT 470.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
Analysis of the impact of international business variables on global organizations and the impact of these organization on the societies in which they operate.

IBUS 471. MULTINATIONAL PEOPLE MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: MGMT 471.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
A systems approach to multinational human resource management incorporating three interrelated subsystems: internal (the multinational company), external (the nation state) and the individual (the manager) in a cross-cultural context.

IBUS 472. GLOBAL MARKETING MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: MKTG 472.
Pre-requisites: IBUS 470/MGMT 470 or MKTG 310.
A practical approach to understanding the implications to marketing functions that result from competing in a global marketplace. Marketing function differences and similarities are explored across national borders and cultures.

IBUS 474. INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: FINC 474.
Pre-requisites: FINC 335.
This course discusses financial management in the international arena.

IBUS 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.


Management Courses


MGMT 120. THE WORLD OF BUSINESS. 5 Credits.

Notes: not open to upper-division business administration majors.
Surveys the basic roles and functions performed by business firms in modern free enterprise societies.

MGMT 197. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

MGMT 200. BUSINESS HISTORY IN THE U.S.. 4 Credits.

Satisfies: GECR for social science, list 3, history.
Provides an overview of the historical development of business practice and thought in the United States using readings from both the time period in question and contemporary scholarly essays.

MGMT 295. PRE-PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. 1-10 Credits.

MGMT 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

MGMT 299. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

MGMT 326. ORGANIZATION THEORY AND BEHAVIOR. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing.
Explores the nature of human behavior in organizations as well as the structural effects of change. Application to the management of human resources is provided. A conceptual foundation is applied to practical situations throughout the course.

MGMT 395. INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

MGMT 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

MGMT 397. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

MGMT 398. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

MGMT 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

MGMT 422. ENTREPRENEURSHIP. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing.
A study of entrepreneurial qualities and methods used to start and expand business ventures. Maximum flexibility is used to allow students to pursue individual interests. Marketing and accounting background helpful.

MGMT 423. BUSINESS AND SOCIETY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MGMT 326, senior standing.
Study of the interrelations between business and its external environment, focusing on the social, political and legal interactions. Review of critical managerial issues from historical, theoretical and ethical perspectives and their impact on organizations.

MGMT 424. EQUITY AND EQUALITY IN THE WORKPLACE. 3 Credits.

Cross listed: WMST 424.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
This course examines feminist theory, the law and business management theories as they apply to equality and equity in the workplace. The course is an integrated approach to business and gender issues.

MGMT 470. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: IBUS 470.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
Analysis of the impact of international business variables on global organizations and the impact of these organizations on the societies in which they operate.

MGMT 471. MULTINATIONAL PEOPLE MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: IBUS 471.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
A systems approach to multinational human resource management incorporating three interrelated subsystems: internal (the multinational company), external (the nation state) and individual (the manager) in a cross-cultural context.

MGMT 480. ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MGMT 326.
This seminar examines the various leadership styles in organizations. Students investigate and develop leadership profiles of past, present and future leaders. Project teams develop a video profile and case of a specific organization.

MGMT 490. DEPARTMENT SENIOR CAPSTONE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ACCT 251, ACCT 252, ACCT 261; DSCI 245, DSCI 346; ECON 200, ECON 201; ENGL 201; FINC 335; MATH 200; MGMT 326; MISC 211; MKTG 310; OPSM 330; MGMT 423 (may be taken concurrently); Computer Literacy I and II and admission to BAB.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
See your major department advisor for the appropriate section number.

MGMT 495. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP-MANAGEMENT. 1-15 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

MGMT 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

MGMT 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

MGMT 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

MGMT 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

MGMT 599. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

MGMT 601. RESEARCH REPORT. 1-15 Credits.

MGMT 695. INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.


Management Information System Courses


MISC 211. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN BUSINESS. 4 Credits.

Notes: students who have passed MISC 311 do not need to take MISC 211.
Pre-requisites: successful completion of the clearance examination or completion of CPLA 100 with a P grade and CPLA 101 with a grade ≥2.0 or completion of CPLA 120 with a grade ≥2.0 and sophomore standing.
This course provides the basic concepts of the use of information technology in business, both globally and locally, to collect, organize, distribute, and present information in a business environment. Students will learn how to collect information from external sources, such as libraries and the internet, and from internal functional areas. Productivity tools such as database, spreadsheets, wordprocessor, and presentation software will then be used to consolidate, organize, synthesize, and present the external and internal information to business decision makers.

MISC 295. INTERNSHIP. 1-6 Credits.

MISC 298. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

MISC 299. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

MISC 370. MULTIMEDIA PRODUCTION OF BUSINESS DOCUMENTS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MISC 211 or equivalent and BUED major, or permission of the instructor.
Learning advanced applications of word processing, presentation, and multimedia software to design formal and technical reports and presentations, correspondence, newsletters, brochures, forms, charts, and graphics. Emphasis is on problem-solving ability to convert raw data into acceptable form using the computer, the Internet, and additional multimedia.

MISC 371. BUSINESS APPLICATIONS PROGRAM DESIGN. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MISC 211 or CSCD 210 or permission of the instructor.
This course provides a thorough coverage of the program design and development process. The student will develop algorithmic solutions to a variety of business computer applications using a number of logic tools for programming and documentation. A high level programming language is used to illustrate the logic and structure of common business applications.

MISC 372. DATA COMMUNICATION AND NETWORK FUNDAMENTALS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MISC 211 or CSCD 210 or permission of the instructor.
This course is a general introduction to current technology for local area networks (LAN), wide area networks (WAN) and the Internet.

MISC 373. BUSINESS DATABASE APPLICATIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MISC 211 or CSCD 210 or permission of the instructor.
This course provides an in-depth study of theory and applications of databases. Emphasis is on the design of flexible databases to meet business information requirements. Topics include database concepts, data modeling, data dictionary, database models, database design, data integrity and managerial considerations.

MISC 374. SPREADSHEET MODELING FOR BUSINESS APPLICATIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MISC 211 or CSCD 211 or permission of the instructor.
Problem solving and data modeling of business applications utilizing spreadsheet software. Graphics, file management, and proper spreadsheet organization topics are covered as well as use of macros for development of user-friendly applications.

MISC 375. EXPERT SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS IN BUSINESS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MISC 211 or CSCD 211 or permission of the instructor.
Introduction to expert systems design and implementation. Topics covered include the study of existing successful applications, the techniques of knowledge representation, and a review of knowledge engineering methodologies and languages. Students build a model expert system using an expert system software package.

MISC 395. COOP FIELDWORK. 1-15 Credits.

MISC 398. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

MISC 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

MISC 481. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MISC 373 or CSCD 327.
This course involves the analysis and design of business systems. It includes the structure and life cycle of systems. The methodology of systems studies and the use of computer aided software engineering (CASE) tools are emphasized. Systems studies are undertaken utilizing cases and actual business systems projects.

MISC 482. SYSTEMS PROJECT AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MISC 371 and MISC 481.
This course emphasizes solving an information systems problem using project management and information systems methodologies. Students will develop a computer information system through the use of CASE tools. Interactive and prototyping approaches to system development are investigated and employed. In addition, students will acquire additional knowledge in planning, managing and presenting a systems project

MISC 485. ADVANCED DATABASE APPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MISC 373 or permission of the instructor.
This course is a continuation of business applications of databases. The course stresses application development through fourth generation programming techniques. The course is designed to take advantage of advanced capabilities in current database management systems. Emphasis is on the design and implementation of business database applications. Topics include data modeling, database design, database implementation, report design, form design, application design, security, backup and recovery and multi-user databases

MISC 486. INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MISC 211.
Provides an understanding of the information security vision and strategy set forth by executive management. Concepts and techniques from the management and organizational behavior disciplines are integrated in order to identify and propose solutions to the problems of information security administration. Domain specific issues such as HIPAA and SOX are addressed as appropriate.

MISC 487. E-COMMERCE AND E-COMMERCE SYSTEM DESIGN. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MISC 211 and MISC 371 or permission of the instructor.
This course explores how the landscape of e-commerce is changing and evolving. The course covers important topics of e-commerce, such as: selling and marketing online, businesses trading and collaborating with other businesses, internal business process supports, legal, ethical and tax issues, Web security and e-commerce infrastructure, and provides students with the technical skills of developing e-commerce applications.

MISC 488. HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MISC 211 or permission of the instructor.
This course acquaints students with current and emergent issues in the area of health and medical information technology from a regional, national and international perspective. The classroom format combines lecture and case-based work with hands-on work using a variety of current electronic medical record (EMR) and ancillary systems.

MISC 495. INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

MISC 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-15 Credits.

MISC 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

MISC 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

MISC 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

MISC 595. INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.


Marketing Courses


MKTG 298. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

MKTG 299. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

MKTG 310. PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing.
An introduction to marketing. The marketing mix: Product offering, supply chain management, pricing, promotion, and introduction to buyer behavior.

MKTG 395. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP MARKETING. 1-15 Credits.

MKTG 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

MKTG 400. BUYER BEHAVIOR. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MKTG 310.
Study of the buyer decision-making process, both consumer and industrial, for the purpose of planning and implementing successful marketing strategies. Includes an examination of both the internal psychological and external sociological factors influencing the decision-making process, and how these factors relate to strategic marketing decisions such as product development, segmentation, and positioning.

MKTG 411. MARKETING RESEARCH. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MKTG 310 and DSCI 346.
A practical and theoretical approach to understanding and applying the procedures and methods used in collecting and analyzing market information for managerial decision-making. Topics include research design, data collection, sampling, questionnaire design, qualitative research methods, processing and interpreting data, and presentation of findings. An applied approach provides practical application of methods studied.

MKTG 412. MARKETING MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MKTG 400 and MKTG 411.
An exploration of key marketing management variables such as buyer behavior, market segmentation and product positioning, product policy, pricing, distribution, promotion and market research in the contexts of strategy development, decision making, implementation and control.

MKTG 413. INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MKTG 310.
A practical and theoretical approach to understanding communications theory and how advertising, sales promotion, public relations, and direct marketing are designed and used by organizations in communicating with various publics.

MKTG 414. RETAIL MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MKTG 310.
A study of the strategies used by retailers as critical members of a supply chain. The relationships among store organization, human resource management, and the retail strategies used by various types of retail outlets are investigated. Merchandising policies (buying, selling, stock control and management), various control strategies, promotion, and public relations activities are also covered.

MKTG 416. SALES FORCE MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MKTG 310.
This course covers the concepts and theories associated with planning, organizing, evaluating, controlling, and managing a professional sales force.

MKTG 417. MARKETING ANALYSIS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MKTG 412.
Strategical analysis of managerial marketing issues involving market trends, marketing research, product planning, distribution channels, pricing, promotion, social trends and the influence marketing strategy has on society.

MKTG 444. APPLIED PROMOTION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MKTG 310.
This course involves students in the research, planning, implementation and evaluation of a promotional event for a local business or organization. A variety of marketing principles are applied in a hands-on real world experience.

MKTG 472. GLOBAL MARKETING MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: IBUS 472.
Pre-requisites: IBUS 470/MGMT 470 or MKTG 310.
A practical approach to understanding the implications to marketing functions that result from competing in a global marketplace. Marketing function differences and similarities are explored across national borders and cultures.

MKTG 481. SPORTS MARKETING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MKTG 310.
Explores the essentials of effective sports marketing, such as the nature of sports products, sports consumers, sports research, sports-product development, sponsorship and licensing. Looks at the marketing of sports and sport products as well as marketing through sports.

MKTG 495. PROF INTERNSHIP-MKTG. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

MKTG 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

MKTG 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

MKTG 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

MKTG 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.


Operations Management Courses


OPSM 299. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

OPSM 330. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: completion of CPLA 100 and CPLA 101 or CPLA 120 and DSCI 245 (or equivalent) and one of the following: MATH 142, MATH 161 or MATH 200.
An integrating study focusing upon the models and methods of production and operations management. Managerial approaches to planning, scheduling and controlling both product and service. Tools include process analysis, plant location, plant layout, capacity planning, inventory control, forecasting, materials requirement planning, PERT/CPM and quality control. Also studies computer-based operations control systems applicable to the above topics.

OPSM 395. INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

OPSM 398. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

OPSM 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

OPSM 425. SERVICE AND OPERATION ANALYSIS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: OPSM 330.
This integrative course includs analysis of both service and manufacturing organizations. The course focuses on case studies and applied quantitative techniques for managing the entire operations of a firm. Decision-making is emphasized through computer simulation and interactive discussion of field and textbook case studies.

OPSM 428. GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing or permission of instructor.
This course examines the actions and values responsible for continuous improvement in the design, evelopment and management process of an organization's supply system. The objective of the course is to understand how to improve the supply system's profitability and ensure its survival as well as the profitability and survival of its customers and suppliers. Global issues and development of supplier relationships are integrated throughout the course material. Cases and field trips are included as appropriate.

OPSM 441. QUALITY MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: OPSM 330.
This course is a review and application of quality management concepts in public and private enterprises. Both qualitative and quantitative techniques are analyzed. Cases and field trips are included as appropriate.

OPSM 495. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP-OPSM. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

OPSM 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

OPSM 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean

OPSM 598. GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.