Earth and Space Science

This is an archived copy of the 2015-2016 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ewu.edu.

Sharen Keattch,
Program Advisor 130 Science Bldg.
509.359.7358
geol@ewu.edu
www.ewu.edu/geology


Faculty

Varies.


Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Arts in Education (BAE)

Undergraduate Minors

Teacher Certification/Add-on Endorsements


Undergraduate Programs

The BAE in Earth and Space Science is for prospective secondary school science teachers. The Earth and Space Science major and minor are interdisciplinary, with required courses from geography, geology, physics, chemistry and biology.

General Admissions Requirements for Earth and Space Science

High school students who plan to enter this program are encouraged to take three or four years of both science and mathematics in high school. University students should generally complete their gecr requirements, particularly in the Natural Sciences, prior to entering the program. Students are encouraged to contact the Earth and Space Science advisor to aid them in selecting these gecr courses.

General Degree Completion Requirements for Earth and Space Science

Grade Requirement for BAE

  • ≥2.5 cumulative average
  • ≥2.0 in each course

Generally Earth and Space Science is taught in the junior high school or middle school. Also, it is occasionally taught as a high school elective or in the upper elementary grades.

Required courses in the following programs of study may have prerequisites. Reference the course description section for clarification.

Subject codes: Biology (BIOL), Chemistry/Biochemistry (CHEM), Geology (GEOL), Geology (GEOG), Mathematics (MATH), Physics  (PHYS)


Biology Courses


BIOL 077. BIOLOGY BLOCK. 5-15 Credits.

BIOL 100. INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: completion of pre-university basic skills in mathematics requirement.
Satisfies: GECR for natural sciences, biology.
This course is an introduction to the methods of study and the three levels of organization in living organisms: cell, organismal and population. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 115. INVESTIGATING BIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: completion of pre-university basic skills in mathematics requirement.
Satisfies: GECR for natural science, biology.
This course is for students planning to teach elementary school. It includes inquiry based biological investigations that support science instruction outlined in the National Science Education Standards and Washington Essential Academic Learning Requirements. Laboratory exercises are included.

BIOL 171. BIOLOGY I. 5 Credits.

Notes: course fee.
Pre-requisites: Concurrent enrollment in MATH 141 or completion of MATH 141 with ≥2.0; Students must receive ≥1.7 to enroll in BIOL 172 and ≥2.0 to enroll in BIOL 270.
This course includes an introduction to biology, covering a review of chemistry from atomic structure through respiration, cell and molecular biology and genetics.

BIOL 172. BIOLOGY II. 5 Credits.

Notes: course fee.
Pre-requisites: ≥1.7 in BIOL 171 and ≥2.0 in MATH 141.
Satisfies: 2nd Natural Sciences biology GECR if BIOL 171 and BIOL 270 are complete or BIOL 172 and BIOL 270 are completed.
Introduction to biology, covering evolution, the diversity of life and interactions among organisms and their environment.

BIOL 173. BIOLOGY III. 5 Credits.

Notes: course fee.
Pre-requisites: ≥ 2.0 in BIOL 172.
This course is an introduction to biology, covering the structure and function of plants and animals, with emphasis on flowering plants and vertebrates.

BIOL 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

BIOL 197. FRESHMAN SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

BIOL 199. SPECIAL STUDIES-BIOLOGY. 1-5 Credits.

BIOL 225. ELEMENTARY MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: completion of or concurrent enrollment in both BIOL 234 and CHEM 163.
This course will discuss micro-organisms and animal parasites, with chief emphasis on those which affect human health. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 232. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY NON-BIOL MAJORS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: one course in college chemistry.
Satisfies: a GECR for natural sciences, biology.
First of a three-quarter sequence concerned with the structure and function of the human organism. Chemistry, cells, histology, integumentary system, skeletal system, excitable tissues and muscular system will be completely and thoroughly covered. Laboratory included that utilizes human cadavers, models, multimedia and other technologies.

BIOL 233. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY NON-BIOL MAJORS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 232.
Satisfies: a GECRfor natural sciences, biology.
Second of a three-quarter sequence concerned with the structure and function of the human organism. Nervous system, autonomic nervous system, special senses, endocrine system, cardiovascular system, lymphatic system and immunity will be completely and thoroughly covered. Laboratory included that utilizes human cadavers, models, multimedia and other technologies.

BIOL 234. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY NON-BIOL MAJORS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 233.
Satisfies: a GECR for natural sciences, biology.
Third of a three-quarter sequence concerned with the structure and function of the human organism. Respiratory system, digestive system, nutrition and metabolism, urinary system, and reproductive system will be completely and thoroughly covered. Laboratory included that utilizes human cadavers, models, multimedia and other technologies.

BIOL 235. ELEMENTARY MEDICAL MICROBIOLOG. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: completion of or concurrent enrollment in both BIOL 234 and CHEM 163.
This course will discuss micro-organisms and animal parasites, with chief emphasis on those which affect human health. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 270. BIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION. 3 Credits.

Notes: the completion of BIOL 171 and BIOL 270 satisfies a GECR for natural sciences, biology; the completion of BIOL 171, BIOL 172 and BIOL 270 satisfies a second GECR for natural sciences, biology.
Pre-requisites: ≥ 2.0 in BIOL 171 or BIOL 172.
Experimental design and performance, including data collection and analysis, scientific writing and use of the biological literature.

BIOL 295. INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

BIOL 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

BIOL 299. SPECIAL STUDIES BIOLOGY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
An opportunity for students to explore problems of special interest.

BIOL 300. HISTORY OF BIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Examines the development of biological ideas in the Western world from early times to the present.

BIOL 301. MICROBIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥1.7 in BIOL 171, ≥2.0 in BIOL 270, CHEM 153.
This course covers morphology, physiology, taxonomy and ecology of the microorganisms, emphasizing prokaryotes, fungi and the viruses. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 302. BOTANY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, BIOL 173, BIOL 270; completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 151.
This course examines the structure, function and phylogenetic relationships in the plant kingdom. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 303. INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, BIOL 173, BIOL 270; completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 151.
This course examines structure, function and phylogenetic relationships of the invertebrate phyla. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 304. VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, BIOL 173, BIOL 270; completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 151.
This course explores the structure, function and phylogenetic relationships of the vertebrates. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 306. NATURAL VEGETATION ECOLOGY OF NORTH AMERICA. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: GEOG 306.
Pre-requisites: GEOG 100 or permission of the instructor.
This course is an introduction to the processes and patterns of natural vegetation, emphasizing the Pacific Northwest.

BIOL 310. FUNDAMENTALS OF GENETICS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥1.7 in BIOL 171, ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, and BIOL 173, CHEM 153.
This course provides comprehensive coverage of the major topic areas of genetics: classical, molecular and evolutionary.

BIOL 312. FUNDAMENTALS OF SOIL SCIENCE. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: GEOG 312.
Pre-requisites: MTHD 104 or clearance by test.
A general introduction to physical, chemical and biological properties of soils.

BIOL 318. BIOLOGY OF WOMEN. 3 Credits.

Cross listed: WMST 318.
The history, biology and myths of human reproduction as they apply to women and the interaction of brain, hormones and social life.

BIOL 320. THE HUMAN PROSPECT. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: HUMN 320.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
Explores the biological and philosophical roots of humans' relationship with the environment.

BIOL 324. ENTOMOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, BIOL 173, CHEM 151.
This course is a study of insect biology. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 332. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 173 with a grade ≥2.5; CHEM 153 with a grade ≥2.5; or instructor permission.
This is the first course in a three-quarter sequence covering the structure and function of the human body. Intended for students with significant background in biology and chemistry who are pursuing health care careers. A laboratory is included each quarter.

BIOL 333. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 332.
The second in a three-quarter sequence covering the structure and function of the human body. Intended for students with significant background in biology and chemistry who are pursuing health care careers. A laboratory is included each quarter.

BIOL 334. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY III. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 333.
The third in a three-quarter sequence covering the structure and function of the human body. Intended for students with significant background in biology and chemistry who are pursuing health care careers. A laboratory is included each quarter.

BIOL 338. DISCOVERING WOMEN IN SCIENCE. 1 Credit.

Cross listed: CHEM 338/GEOL 338/HIST 338/PHYS 338/PSYC 338/WMST 338.
The course uses several scientific themes to rediscover from the past and find in contemporary research, the women who have made significant contributions to science.

BIOL 340. BIOLOGY AND SOCIETY. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: either BIOL 100 or ≥1.7 in BIOL 171 or one of them taken concurrently.
This course will discuss biological, social, ethical and economic implications of current advances in the biological sciences.

BIOL 343. BIOLOGY OF AGING. 3 Credits.

This course will discuss the aging of biological organisms, viewed from the molecular level through the population level. the emphasis will be on human aging.

BIOL 351. PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 173 and CHEM 153.
An integrative understanding of the physiological systems of vertebrates, analyzing physiological processes from the cellular level upwards, culminating in organismal function. This course reinforces concepts from biology, physics, chemistry and mathematics.

BIOL 352. PRINCIPLES OF PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 173, CHEM 153.
This course addresses mechanisms by which plants obtain nutrients from the soil and atmosphere, convert light energy to chemical energy, and coordinate responses to shifting environmental conditions in roots, leaves and reproductive structures.

BIOL 353. PRINCIPLES OF MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 173, CHEM 153.
This course explores the physiology of unicellular microbes. It includes topics on microbial replication and how microbes adapt to their environment through regulating gene expression, horizontal gene transfer and cell-cell communication.

BIOL 380. DATA ANALYSIS FOR BIOLOGISTS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, BIOL 173, BIOL 270; completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 151 and a ≥2.0 in MATH 141.
Satisfies: mathematics proficiency.
Students gain the knowledge and skills required to conduct and interpret data analysis and statistics commonly applied in Biology. Key concepts of statistical analysis such as populations and samples, uncertainty, p-values, hypothesis testing, Type I & Type II errors, statistical methods and R programming language are covered.

BIOL 390. BIOLOGY TEACHING METHODS. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: ≥1.7 in BIOL 171, ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, BIOL 173 and BIOL 270; co-requisite SCED 390.
This course is designed for individuals seeking endoresement to teach junior or senior high school biology or general science. Various types of biology programs, organization of lesson materials, techniques and laboratory safety are included in the course.

BIOL 395. INTERNSHIP/CO-OP FIELDWK. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean; only 5 credits will be allowed toward the electives.

BIOL 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-6 Credits.

BIOL 397. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

BIOL 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

BIOL 405. LIMNOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: any one of BIOL 301, BIOL 302, BIOL 303, BIOL 304 or concurrent enrollment.
This course includes the general study of the physical, chemical and biological features of lakes and streams. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 409. MYCOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: any one of BIOL 301, BIOL 302, BIOL 303, BIOL 304 or concurrent enrollment.
This course includes discussion of the structure, physiology, ecology and taxonomy of microfungi and mushrooms with an emphasis on fungi of the Northwest. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 411. FIELD BOTANY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of instructor.
The goal of this course is to gain an appreciation of natural history and the unique array of plants found in our region. This will be a practical, hands-on, field-based course where students learn how to identify plants.

BIOL 420. EPIDEMIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 301.
This course is a study of the factors which determine the frequencies and distributions of communicable diseases among humans.

BIOL 421. MEDICAL BACTERIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 301.
This course addresses microbial agents of human disease, with an emphasis on bacteria.

BIOL 423. EVOLUTION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 310 plus any one of BIOL 301, BIOL 302, BIOL 303, BIOL 304.
This course is a study of variation, adaptation and speciation in biological systems.

BIOL 430. IMMUNOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Any one of BIOL 301, BIOL 303, BIOL 304 or permission of the instructor. BIOL 460 is recommended.
This course covers immune reactions of animals with principal emphasis on those associated with infectious diseases.

BIOL 432. VIROLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Any one of BIOL 301, BIOL 303, BIOL 304 or permission of the instructor. BIOL 460 is recommended.
This course includes coverage of the molecular biology of microbial, animal and plant viruses and their host-parasite relationships. Those viruses associated with human and animal diseases are emphasized.

BIOL 435. BIOLOGY OF CANCER. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥ 2.0 in BIOL 173 or BIOL 234, CHEM 153 or CHEM 163.
A general study of human neoplasms.

BIOL 436. CELL BIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 171, BIOL 172, BIOL 173, BIOL 270, BIOL 310 and CHEM 153.
This course is a comprehensive study of cell biology from a structural and functional perspective.

BIOL 438. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 310 and one of BIOL 301, BIOL 302, BIOL 303, BIOL 304, CHEM 351.
This course includes study of gene structure, organization, function and regulation. Equal emphasis is given to the molecular processes and genetic phenomena of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

BIOL 440. ECOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 161 or MATH 380 and BIOL 172, BIOL 173, BIOL 270 with minimum grade ≥2.0 for all; or permission of the instructor.
This course involves the study of factors which determine the distribution and abundance of organisms.

BIOL 441. ECOLOGY LAB. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: current or prior enrollment in BIOL 440.
A field and laboratory course which emphasizes testing ecological hypotheses.

BIOL 442. CONSERVATION BIOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥1.7 in BIOL 171, ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, BIOL 173, BIOL 270 or permission of the instructor; BIOL 440 recommended.
Conservation biology is a synthetic discipline that has arisen in response to the current unprecedented rates of extinction and draws on a wide range of basic sciences and applied fields to address the problem of loss of biological diversity. This course introduces students to the discipline of conservation biology, familiarizes students with literature in conservation biology and provides students with a forum for discussion of some major topics in conservation biology.

BIOL 443. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥1.7 in BIOL 171, ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, BIOL 173 and BIOL 270 or permission of the instructor; BIOL 440 recommended.
This course examines the historical and political development of wildlife management, the ecological principles that underpin management decisions, primary approaches to management, and current management issues.

BIOL 444. FIELD ECOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 423 or BIOL 440 or permission of the instructor.
In this course students conduct observational and/or experimental field studies designed to answer contemporary ecological questions. The course emphasizes hypothesis testing, study design, field techniques, data analysis, and written and oral study presentation. Aquatic ecology, terrestrial ecology, or both may be emphasized

BIOL 445. STREAM ECOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: one of: BIOL 301, BIOL 302, BIOL 303, BIOL 304; or permission of instructor.
This course covers the diverse ecological functions of streams and their roles in global processes. The primary focus is on ecosystem function. Stream organisms and their communities are also covered. Laboratories include field work, laboratory techniques, data analysis and professional methods for measuring rates of stream ecosystem processes and investigating stream communities.

BIOL 446. RIPARIAN ECOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 171, BIOL 172, BIOL 173 and BIOL 270 or permission of instructor.
This course will focus on riparian areas (riparia), which experience intermittent flooding by water moving within a catchment. Riparia form the interface between terrestrial and aquatic habitats and perform critical ecosystem functions. This class will address riparian physical processes, biotic adaptations, human impacts, conservation, restoration and management.

BIOL 450. MAMMALOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 304 or permission of the instructor.
This course covers the classifications, life histories and ecology of mammals. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 454. ORNITHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 304 or permission of the instructor.
Natural history and taxonomy of birds.

BIOL 460. HEMATOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 310 plus one of BIOL 301, BIOL 303 or BIOL 304; or permission of the instructor.
This courses discusses the morphology and hemostasis of the normal and abnormal human hematological system. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 462. ICHTHYOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, BIOL 173, BIOL 270 or permission of the instructor.
This course is a systematic and ecological study of fishes with emphasis on the freshwater fishes of the U.S. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 463. FISHERIES BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, BIOL 173, BIOL 270 or permission of the instructor.
This course covers the development of the biological basis of fisheries management and the role of fish populations as sources of food and recreation for humans.

BIOL 470. BIOLOGICAL ILLUSTRATION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, BIOL 173, BIOL 270 or permission of the instructor.
The emphasis in this course is placed on developing the various techniques commonly used in rendering biological illustrations that are suitable for publication.

BIOL 471. PRE-MEDICAL, DENTAL, VETERINARY AND PHARMACY PREPARATION. 1-2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor.
Prepares students for their interviews for medical, dental, veterinary or pharmacy school and for professional activities. Discusses medical ethics and presents students with a wide range of dilemmas associated with the medical field and has students work toward resolutions.

BIOL 473. NEUROBIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Notes: PHYS 133 or PHYS 153 is recommended.
Pre-requisites: ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, BIOL 173, BIOL 270; CHEM 153 or permission from the instructor.
This course introduces students to the principles of neurobiology. Emphasis is placed on human neuroscience but examples from a wide range of invertebrates and vertebrates are used to best illustrate neurobiological principles, concepts, and mechanisms. The course also includes a laboratory component focusing on neuroanatomy.

BIOL 476. MUSCLE PHYSIOLOGY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 332 or permission of the instructor.
This course examines the structure, function and regulation of muscle tissue with emphasis on skeletal muscle.

BIOL 477. EMBRYOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 310.
This course examines the dynamics, physical features and mechanisms of early organismic development from both the classical embryology and modern genetic perspective. Emphasis is placed on mammalian embryology. Also discussed are state-of-art technologies currently in use in medical and veterinary practice and in research.

BIOL 479. CLINICAL LABORATORY THEORY AND PRACTICUM I. 6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to Professional Training at
Sacred Heart Medical Center. This course is a clinical laboratory science course, which will begin at the affiliate hospital in the latter part of summer of a student's junior year. It includes lecture and laboratory instruction in clinical immunohematology, clinical chemistry, phlebotomy, clinical hematology, clinical microscopy and urinalysis, clinical body fluids, transfusion techniques and clinical microbiology.

BIOL 480. CLINICAL LABORATORY THEORY AND PRACTICUM II. 12 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 479.
BIOL 480 is the second course in clinical laboratory science at the affiliate hospital. Students will review basic and advanced information in immunohematology, clinical chemistry, clinical hematology, clinical microbiology, clinical immunology, medical mycology and phlebotomy techniques. Students will perform patient laboratory testing under the guidance of trained professionals.

BIOL 481. FRESHWATER INVERT ZOOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, BIOL 173, BIOL 270 are required; BIOL 405 or BIOL 440 is recommended.
This is a field course stressing the collection, preservation and identification of freshwater invertebrates. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 482. CLINICAL LABORATORY THEORY AND PRACTICUM III. 12 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 480.
BIOL 482 is the third course in clinical laboratory science at the affiliate hospital. Students continue to study advanced clinical immunohematology, clinical chemistry, clinical microbiology and clinical hematology. During this course, students will perform actual patient laboratory testing under the guidance of trained professionals.

BIOL 483. CLINICAL LABORATORY THEORY AND PRACTICUM IV. 12 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 482.
BIOL 483 is the fourth course in clinical laboratory science at the affiliate hospital. Students will learn financial and quality management of clinical laboratory, ethics and professional behavior. Students will continue their training in advanced diagnostics in clinical microbiology, clinical chemistry, hematology and immunohematology. During this course, students will perform actual patient laboratory testing under the guidance of trained professionals.

BIOL 485. MOLECULAR BIOTECHNOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 301, BIOL 310, CHEM 480.
A study of the concepts, experiments and industrial applications of fermentation theory, recombinant DNA protocols, plasmids and cloning, DNA, RNA and protein sequencing and synthesis, monoclonal antibodies and cell fusion, solid support enzyme technology, bioenergy reactions, biomass and secondary metabolite production and biodegradation.

BIOL 488. MOLECULAR BIOTECHNOLOGY LABORATORY. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 485 or concurrent enrollment.
Experiments include basic analytical and separatory techniques, analytical and preparative fermentations, restriction analysis of viral DNA, RNA labelling and sequencing, tissue fractionation and lectin affinity column chromatography, DNA cloning, screening and blot analysis, mammalian cell culture and fusion, immunochemistry and in vitro translation.

BIOL 489. TOPICS IN MOLECULAR BIOTECHNOLOGY. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 485, BIOL 488.
Readings and discussion of research and issues in molecular biotechnology.

BIOL 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing (135 credits), BIOL 310, and one of the following: BIOL 301, BIOL 302, BIOL 303, or BIOL 304.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
Integrated Studies in Form and Function, or Integrated Studies in Microbial and Molecular Biology, or Integrated Studies in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. See your major department advisor for the appropriate section number. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 490A. BIOTECHNOLOGY CAPSTONE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing, BIOL 485, BIOL 488, BIOL 489.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
This capstone course is specific to the Biotechnology Option. Integration of lecture and laboratory experience to culminate in research project. See your major department. A laboratory is included.

BIOL 491. SENIOR THESIS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 483.
BIOL 491 is a Senior Thesis in clinical laboratory science at the affiliate hospital. Students will have lectures in ethics and professional behavior, management information and participate individually in small clinical laboratory experience and continue their training of advanced diagnostic work in clinical microbiology, clinical chemistry, hematology, and immunohematology. During this course, students will perform actual patient laboratory testing under the guidance of trained professionals. An individual senior project integrating practical and theoratical topics will be the culmination of this course.

BIOL 495. INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

Notes: only 5 credits will be allowed toward the electives.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

BIOL 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

BIOL 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

BIOL 498. SEMINAR. 1-2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: advanced standing in departmental program.

BIOL 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

BIOL 500. RESEARCH SEMINAR. 1 Credit.

Notes: must be repeated for at least 2 credits.
Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program in biology.
Students develop and present seminars on their research to an audience of peers and faculty.

BIOL 501. SEMINAR PROGRAMMING. 1 Credit.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit; students shall be enrolled in BIOL 501 during all quarters of residency when not enrolled in BIOL 500.
Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program in biology or permission of the instructor.
Students learn to host a scientific meeting by developing and distributing a scientific meeting program, making all necessary logistical arrangements for the meeting and conducting the meeting itself. The product produced is the Department of Biology's Graduate Student Symposium.

BIOL 505. LIMNOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program.
An in-depth study of the physical, chemical, and biological features of lakes and streams incorporating independent field work and/or synthesis of primary literature.

BIOL 509. MYCOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
Structure, physiology, ecology, and taxonomy of microfungi and mushrooms, with an emphasis on fungi of the Northwest and on the design and implementation of independent mycological experiments.

BIOL 510. BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS I. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the Biology Master’s Program or permission of the instructor.
Methods of biological research, including scientific writing and presentation, utilization of scientific literature, and a brief introduction to experimental design and data analysis.

BIOL 511. BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS II. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 510.
This course will explore implications of observational and experimental study design and expose students to quantitative hypothesis tests appropriate for the biological sciences.

BIOL 512. CURRENT TOPICS IN PHYSIOLOGY. 2 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated for credit.
Pre-requisites: admission to the biology master’s program or permission of the instructor.
Current readings in a specialized area of physiology, including functional aspects of animals, plants or micro-organisms or functions common to two or more groups of organisms.

BIOL 513. CURRENT TOPICS IN CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY. 2 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated for credit.
Pre-requisites: admission to the biology master’s program or permission of the instructor.
This course will explore modern developments across the molecular and cell biology disciplines. Topics will build on research expertise of faculty as well as current literature. These areas include environmental and medical microbiology, recombinant DNA, immuno-pathology, embryo physiology.

BIOL 514. CURRENT TOPICS IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the Biology Master’s Program or permission of the instructor.
Current readings on selected topics of ecology and evolution. Topics will depend upon interests of instructor and students. Possible topics include: evolution of mating systems, aquatic ecology, community ecology, microevolutionary processes, population dynamics, evolution of life history strategies.

BIOL 515. GROWTH OF BIOLOGICAL THOUGHT. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the Biology Master’s Program or permission of the instructor.
This course will include readings on topics such as changing biological paradigms, philosophies and ethical behavior of biologists in their historic as well as current context. Topics will be developed in relation to antecedent discoveries, available technology, political events and social climate.

BIOL 519. REVIEW OF LITERATURE. 1 Credit.

Presentations by faculty and graduate students of current biological research papers.

BIOL 520. EPIDEMIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
A study of the factors which determine the frequencies and distributions of the communicable diseases among humans with an emphasis on independent synthesis of current literature.

BIOL 521. MEDICAL BACTERIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 301.
The microbial agents of human disease, with an emphasis on bacteria.

BIOL 530. IMMUNOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
Immune reactions of animals with principal emphasis on those associated with infectious diseases. Students will conduct primary literature review.

BIOL 532. VIROLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
The molecular biology of microbial, animal and plant viruses, especially those viruses associated with human and animal diseases and their host-parasite relationships with an emphasis on synthesis of primary literature.

BIOL 535. BIOLOGY OF CANCER. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
An advanced study of human neoplasms through synthesis of current literature.

BIOL 536. CELL BIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
A comprehensive study of cellular biology from a structural and functional perspective incorporating independent laboratory and/or synthesis of primary literature.

BIOL 539. SPECIAL STUDIES. 1-5 Credits.

BIOL 542. CONSERVATION BIOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
Conservation biology is a synthetic discipline that has arisen in response to the current unprecedented rates of extinction and draws on a wide range of basic sciences and applied fields to address the problem of loss of biological diversity. This course examines the discipline of conservation biology, familiarizes students with literature in conservation biology, and provides students with a forum for discussion of some major topics in Conservation Biology. Students incorporate independent field work and/or synthesis of primary literature.

BIOL 543. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
An examination of the historical and political development of wildlife management, the ecological principles that underpin management decisions, primary approaches, and current management issues incorporating independent field work and/or synthesis of primary literature.

BIOL 546. RIPARIAN ECOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the Biology Master’s Program or permission of the instructor.
This course will focus on riparian areas (riparia), areas which experience intermittent flooding by water moving within a catchment. Riparia form the interface between terrestrial and aquatic habitats and perform critical ecosystem functions. This class will address riparian physical processes, biotic adaptations, human impacts, conservation, restoration and management.

BIOL 550. MAMMALOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
The classifications, life histories and ecology of mammals with an emphasis on independent field or literature review studies.

BIOL 554. ORNITHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
Natural history and taxonomy of birds with an emphasis on independent field or literature review studies.

BIOL 560. HEMATOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
An in-depth study of the morphology and hemostasis of the normal and abnormal human hematological system incorporating primary literature review and seminar preparation.

BIOL 562. ICHTHYOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
An in-depth systematic and ecological study of fishes, especially the freshwater fishes of the U.S., incorporating review of primary literature and independent field research.

BIOL 563. FISHERIES BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
Development of the biological basis of fisheries management and the role of fish population as sources of food and recreation for humans. Synthesis of this information by developing a comprehensive management plan for a particular species or body of water.

BIOL 573. NEUROBIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the MS Biology Program or permission of instructor.
This course introduces students to the principles of neurobiology. Emphasis is placed on human neuroscience but examples from a wide range of invertebrates and vertebrates are used to best illustrate neurobiological principles, concepts, and mechanisms. The course also includes a laboratory component focusing on neuroanatomy.

BIOL 576. MUSCLE PHYSIOLOGY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 233 or BIOL 436 or BIOL 490.
The structure, function and regulation of muscle tissue, with an emphasis on skeletal muscle.

BIOL 581. FRESHWATER INVERT ZOOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
A field course incorporating techniques used in the collection, preservation and identification of freshwater invertebrates into independent field research.

BIOL 585. MOLECULAR BIOTECHNOLOGY I. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
An in-depth examination of animal and plant cell culture and microbial fermentation from the perspective of physiology and biochemical engineering.

BIOL 588. MOLECULAR BIOTECHNOLOGY LAB. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
Advanced quantitative procedures in recombinant DNA and monoclonal antibodies.

BIOL 589. MOLECULAR BIOTECHNOLOGY LAB. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to graduate program or permission of the instructor.
Advanced quantitative procedures in recombinant DNA and monoclonal antibodies.

BIOL 595. INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

BIOL 596. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

BIOL 597. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: only one workshop course for up to 3 credits may be used to fulfill graduate degree requirements.

BIOL 598. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Students select, develop, and present seminars on selected topics in biology to an audience of peers and faculty.

BIOL 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

BIOL 600. THESIS RESEARCH. 1-10 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Thesis will represent culmination of original research under direction of graduate committee.

BIOL 601. RESEARCH REPORT. 1-10 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Non-thesis directed research. Not available for Master of Science in Biology.

BIOL 696. COLLEGE TEACHING INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.


Chemistry and Biochemistry Courses


CHEM 100. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY. 5 Credits.

This course prepares those who have not had a satisfactory background in high school chemistry to take CHEM 151 or CHEM 161. Topics include the scientific method, SI and metric systems, unit conversions, atomic structure, periodic table, bonding, and stoichiometry. Laboratory work is included.

CHEM 121. CHEMISTRY AND ITS ROLE IN SOCIETY. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: GECR for natural sciences, chemistry.
Basic chemical principles are used to examine some of the chemistry that most directly impacts individuals and society on a day-to-day basis. The course is designed to develop in students an appreciation for the chemical basis of their bodies and their environment. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic nature of the field of chemistry and efforts are made to dispel many of the common misconceptions that nonscientists often have about chemistry and other natural sciences. Laboratory work is included.

CHEM 140. CRIMINALISTICS AND FORENSIC CHEMISTRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: two semesters of high school science or the equivalent are strongly recommended.
This course provides an overview of forensic science and criminalistics including history and the modern role of forensic science in the judicial system. Topics covered include DNA typing, trace evidence analysis, firearms and tool marks, and impression evidence. Laboratory work is included. Labs will focus on current forensic techniques.

CHEM 151. GENERAL CHEMISTRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥2.0 in MATH 141 or concurrent enrollment; ≥2.0 in CHEM 100 or ≥2.0 in CHEM 161 or one year of high school chemistry.
Satisfies: the completion of CHEM 151 satisfies a GECR for natural sciences, chemistry.
Topics will include units, uncertainty in measurement, ionic nomenclature, structure of matter, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, thermochemistry, periodic table and chemical bonding. Quantitative and qualitative laboratory work is included.

CHEM 152. GENERAL CHEMISTRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 151; ≥2.0 in MATH 141.
Satisfies: the completion of CHEM 151 and CHEM 152 satisfies a second GECR for natural sciences, chemistry.
Topics include properties of gases, liquids and solids; intermolecular forces; properties of solutions; chemical equilibrium and acid base equilibria. Laboratory work includes quantitative and qualitative analysis.

CHEM 153. GENERAL CHEMISTRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 152.
Topics include kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear and/or chemistry of nonmetals, and transition metals and coordination chemistry. Laboratory work includes quantitative and qualitative analysis.

CHEM 161. GENERAL CHEMISTRY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of MTHD 104 or MATH 107 or MATH 141 or equivalent. A high school chemistry course or CHEM 100 is highly recommended.
Satisfies: a GECR for natural sciences, chemistry.
Course includes a survey of inorganic chemistry for pre-nursing, pre-dental hygiene and allied health science students. Topics include atomic structure, the periodic table, stoichiometry, solutions, equilibrium, acids and bases. Laboratory work is included. A placement exam will be given during the first week of classes.

CHEM 162. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 161.
Satisfies: a GECR for natural sciences, chemistry.
The course is a survey of organic chemistry for pre-nursing, pre-dental hygiene and allied health science students. Topics include naming, properties and reactions of hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, amines and carbonyl compounds. Laboratory work is included.

CHEM 163. BIOCHEMISTRY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 162.
This course is a survey of biochemistry for pre-nursing, pre-dental hygiene, and allied health science students. Topics include amino acids, proteins, enzymes, lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, biotechnology, and metabolic pathways. Laboratory work is included.

CHEM 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

CHEM 199. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

CHEM 297. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-10 Credits.

CHEM 304. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. 6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 153.
Theory and practice of gravimetric and volumetric analysis with an introduction to some elements of instrumental analysis.

CHEM 316. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 151, CHEM 152, CHEM 153 or CHEM 161, CHEM 162, CHEM 163.
The course is an introduction to environmental chemistry covering both fundamental chemical principles and societal implications. Emphasis will be placed on local issues such as Hanford Nuclear Reservation and the environmental impact of mining. Laboratory work is included.

CHEM 319. MODERN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 153.
This course covers periodicity, group trends, structure-reactivity relationships of the elements and chemical reactions.

CHEM 338. DISCOVERING WOMEN IN SCIENCE. 1 Credit.

Cross listed: BIOL 338/GEOL 338/HIST 338/PHYS 338/PSYC 338/WMST 338.
The course uses several scientific themes to rediscover from the past and find in contemporary research, the women who have made significant contributions to science.

CHEM 350. PRINCIPLES OF PHARMACOLOGY. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 163, BIOL 233 or equivalent.
The course is primarily intended for the athletic training or other allied health science students. The course presents a review of the actions of over-the-counter drugs and an introduction to the principles of pharmacological action from the integrated foundations of physiology, organic chemistry, and biochemistry.

CHEM 351. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 153.
An integrated study of fundamental organic chemistry for Chemistry majors and students planning on careers in medicine, dentistry, pharmacology, engineering, or related fields. Emphasizes nomenclature, bonding, reactivity, stereochemistry, synthetic methods, reaction mechanisms, physical properties, and spectrometric identification of the principal classes of organic compounds, including biochemical examples.

CHEM 352. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 351.
An integrated study of fundamental organic chemistry for Chemistry majors and students planning on careers in medicine, dentistry, pharmacology, engineering, or related fields. Emphasizes nomenclature, bonding, reactivity, stereochemistry, synthetic methods, reaction mechanisms, physical properties, and spectrometric identification of the principal classes of organic compounds, including biochemical examples.

CHEM 353. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 352.
A comprehensive study of the chemistry of polyfunctional carbon compounds.

CHEM 357. NEUROPHARMACOLOGY. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 163 and BIOL 233 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
The course is primarily intended for pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-pharmacy or other science students. Topics covered include CNS neurotransmitters and their pharmacology, various biochemical hypotheses for neurological disorders, and the pharmacology of a variety of psychoactive drug classes of use or abuse.

CHEM 372. ORGANIC CHEM LABORATORY I. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 351.
This course is an introduction to the elementary techniques of the organic laboratory; including synthesis, application of chromatography, and spectrometry. This is a laboratory course.

CHEM 373. ORGANIC CHEM LABORATORY II. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 352 and CHEM 372.
This course emphasizes spectrometry, synthesis, structure determination and advanced techniques in isolation, purification and analysis. This is a laboratory course.

CHEM 390. CHEMICAL METHODS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 153 and concurrent enrollment in SCED 390, or permission of the instructor.
This course is for chemistry majors planning to teach in the secondary schools. It includes organization of lesson materials and techniques, and evaluation methods. Laboratory work is included.

CHEM 395. INTERNSHIP. 1-10 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

CHEM 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-6 Credits.

CHEM 397. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-10 Credits.

CHEM 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-10 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Library or laboratory study of a chemical problem.

CHEM 416. ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 304, CHEM 316 and CHEM 352 (or concurrent), or permission of the instructor.
This course includes a detailed study of atmospheric, soil, water, and waste water chemistry. Aspects of environmental/analytical chemistry will be introduced. Laboratory work will cover aspects of sampling, instrumental and automated analysis, and regulatory requirements. Students will concentrate in the area of their particular interest, leading to a comprehensive written research report and presentation. Laboratory work is included.

CHEM 418. MODERN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 304.
Principles of recently developed methods of analytical chemistry.

CHEM 419. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 319 and CHEM 422, or permission of the instructor.
This course covers ionic, covalent and metallic bonding, complexes, acids and bases, molecular structure, symmetry, and thermodynamics of inorganic reactions. It also introduces mechanisms of inorganic reactions and organometallic chemistry of selected groups of elements. Laboratory work is included.

CHEM 420. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 422 or permission of the instructor.
This course introduces instrumental methods of analysis. This is a laboratory course.

CHEM 421. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. 4 Credits.

Notes: for CHEM 421, completion of a computer programming course is strongly recommended.
Pre-requisites: CHEM 304, PHYS 133 or PHYS 153, MATH 162.
Classical and statistical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, quantum theory, kinetics, symmetry, spectroscopic, and diffraction methods of structure determination.

CHEM 422. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 421.
Classical and statistical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, quantum theory, kinetics, symmetry, spectroscopic, and diffraction methods of structure determination.

CHEM 423. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 422.
Classical and statistical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, quantum theory, kinetics, symmetry, spectroscopic, and diffraction methods of structure determination.

CHEM 431. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY. 1 Credit.

Notes: for CHEM 421, completion of a computer programming course is strongly recommended.
Pre-requisites: concurrent enrollment in CHEM 421.
(See your Chemistry/Biochemistry advisor.) These courses cover data treatment, current physicochemical techniques, computer applications to chemical systems. These are laboratory courses

CHEM 432. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: concurrent enrollment in CHEM 422.
These courses cover data treatment, current physicochemical techniques, computer applications to chemical systems. These are laboratory courses

CHEM 433. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: concurrent enrollment in CHEM 423.
These courses cover data treatment, current physicochemical techniques, computer applications to chemical systems. These are laboratory courses

CHEM 440. ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: concurrent enrollment or completion of CHEM 423.
Further development of principles underlying molecular symmetry, group theory and quantum chemistry, with applications to molecular orbitals and molecular spectroscopy. Introduction to semi-empirical calculations of electronic properties of molecules and analysis of spectroscopic data.

CHEM 445. TOPICS IN FORENSIC CHEMISTRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: acceptance into BS forensic option.
This course includes a detailed investigation of current topics in forensic chemistry and forensic science. Topics will include courtroom testimony, laboratory accreditation, and analyst certification. Laboratory work is included.

CHEM 450. ADVANCED FORENSIC CHEMISTRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: acceptance into BS forensic option.
This course includes a detailed examination of the techniques of forensic chemistry including organic, inorganic, and instrumental analysis. Topics include gunshot residue, drugs and toxicology, paint, arson and explosives, and biochemical methods such as electrophoresis. Advanced topics in crime scene procedures, chain-of-custody, and quality assurance, will be discussed. Laboratory work is included.

CHEM 454. CLINICAL CHEMISTRY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 304 and CHEM 352.
This course is an introduction to both the methodologies involved in the analyses of diagnostically important compounds in clinical chemistry, (i.e., spectroscopy, ion-selective electrodes, enzymology, immunoassays and liquid chromatography), and the biochemical and physiological correlations of normal and disease states. This is intended for medical technology and chemistry majors and students with interests in medical sciences.

CHEM 465. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 353 and CHEM 421 or permission of the instructor.
This course is an in-depth study of the mechanisms of organic reactions in vitro and in vivo, coupled to a detailed investigation of current techniques in structural analysis of organic compounds.

CHEM 466. STRUCTURAL ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 353 and CHEM 421, or permission of the instructor.
This course is an in-depth study of modern analytical techniques used in the structural analysis of organic compounds. This course will comprise both theory and practical experience with the instruments. Topics covered include UV, IR, NMR, mass spectrometry, and chromatography. This is a laboratory course with lecture included.

CHEM 471. PRE-MEDICAL, DENTAL, VETERINARY AND PHARMACY PREPARATION. 1-2 Credits.

Prequisites: CHEM 480 or permission of instructor. Pepares students for their application to medical, dental, veterinary or pharmacy school and for professional activities.

CHEM 480. BIOCHEMISTRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 352 (or concurrent enrollment). Note for the Biochemistry Option only, concurrent enrollment or completion of BIOL 310 is suggested and CHEM 483 must be taken concurrently.
(see your Chemistry/Biochemistry advisor.) This course covers elements of biochemistry, including the structure and function of the major classes of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids.

CHEM 481. INTERMEDIARY METABOLISM. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 480.
Biosynthesis and metabolism of nucleotides, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and steroids; regulation and integration of biochemical pathways.

CHEM 482. INTEGRATED TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHEM 480.
Explores energy pathways, signal transduction pathways and genetic information pathways in living organisms. Provides a chemical perspective of the key principles of bioenergetics and membrane transport. Specific topics, discussed at a molecular level, are selected from, but not limited to, the following: electron transport, proton pumping, and ATP production in mitochondria and chloroplasts; hormone induced signal transduction; RNA synthesis and processing, and protein synthesis and processing.

CHEM 483. BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: concurrent enrollment or completion of CHEM 480.
Experiments include basic analytical and separatory techniques applied to problems in nucleotide identification, lipid turnover, photosynthesis, enzyme kinetics and cell fractionation.

CHEM 484. BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: concurrent enrollment or completion of CHEM 480.
Experiments include basic analytical and separatory techniques applied to problems in nucleotide identification, lipid turnover, photosynthesis, enzyme kinetics, and cell fractionation.

CHEM 491. SENIOR THESIS. 4-6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
Directed research in your area of chemistry leading to an oral presentation and written report. See your advisor for further information.

CHEM 495. INTERNSHIP. 1-10 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Supervised chemistry-related experiences with a professional or business organization.

CHEM 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-15 Credits.

CHEM 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-10 Credits.

CHEM 498. SEMINAR. 1-2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor.
Oral presentation of a chemical topic.

CHEM 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-10 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Research on a chemical problem.

CHEM 539. SPECIAL STUDIES. 2-6 Credits.

CHEM 597. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-15 Credits.

CHEM 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 2-6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.


Geography Courses


GEOG 100. FUNDAMENTALS OF THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a GECRfor natural sciences, geography.
An introduction to the principal components of the earth’s natural systems of weather, climate, water, soils, natural vegetation and landforms and their interrelationships.

GEOG 101. FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN GEOGRAPHY. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: GECR for social sciences, list ‑2, anthropology, geography, psychology and sociology.
An introduction to the study of spatial variations among human cultures and the patterns of interaction between humans and the natural environment, with special emphasis on topics including language, religion, demography, political systems, technology, agriculture, manufacturing and urbanization.

GEOG 115. INVESTIGATING EARTH SCIENCE. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: GEOL 115.
Pre-requisites: pre-university basic skills in mathematics.
Satisfies: a GECR for natural sciences, geology.
For students planning to teach elementary school. Includes inquiry-based earth science investigations that support science instruction outlined in the National Science Education Standards and Washington Essential Academic Learning Requirements.

GEOG 195. INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

GEOG 201. INTRODUCTION TO FIELD RESEARCH. 5 Credits.

This course presents the fundamentals of field research design and performance.

GEOG 204. ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a GECR for natural sciences, geography.
An introduction to the earth-atmosphere system. The course surveys the physical nature of the atmosphere including weather elements, weather systems and climate. The course addresses the social and environmental issues related to natural and human induced changes in the composition of the atmosphere.

GEOG 226. INTRODUCTION TO GIS SOFTWARE DESIGN. 2 Credits.

This course provides hands-on experience and teaches students technical proficiency using GIS software through demonstration and laboratory exercises.

GEOG 227. INTRODUCTION TO MAP AND AIR PHOTO ANALYSIS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOG 100 or GEOG 101 or permission of instructor.
The primary focus of this course is mastering the uses of maps and remote imagery as sources of geographic information, both environmental and cultural. Special attention will be directed toward maps as communication devices. The course assumes no specific prior knowledge about maps and mapping and will be of value for those wishing to move on to cartography and geographic information systems (GIS) courses as well as general background for social science and education majors.

GEOG 230. WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
A survey of world geographical relationships. Includes an examination of the distribution of selected physical and human phenomena and the processes responsible for the distributions and the varying interrelationships from place to place between humans and the environment.

GEOG 250. GLOBAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. 3 Credits.

This course is a survey of the patterns, structures and locational principles of economic activity, including world regional and historical economic development, natural resources, agriculture, manufacturing, transportation, communications and the distribution of service sectors. Particular emphasis will be placed on the process of globalization, free trade and the increasing significance of space and place in the 21st century global economy.

GEOG 299. SPECIAL STUDIES. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Subjects studied vary according to faculty and student interest.

GEOG 300. PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOG 100 or permission of the instructor.
Systematic study of physical events and processes within the human environment including elements of landforms, weather and climate, vegetation and soils.

GEOG 301. HUMAN GEOGRAPHY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: successful completion of ENGL 201.
A study of humans, focused on their interaction with the physical and cultural environments of the earth.

GEOG 305. INTRO TO OCEANOGRAPHY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: mathematics clearance.
An introduction to the nature, occurrence, distribution and interrelationships of phenomena in the oceans, the basins and margins.

GEOG 306. VEGETATION ECOLOGY OF NORTH AMERICA. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: BIOL 306.
Pre-requisites: GEOG 100 or permission of the instructor.
This course is an introduction to the processes and patterns of vegetation, emphasizing the Pacific Northwest.

GEOG 312. FUNDAMENTALS OF SOIL SCIENCE. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: BIOL 312.
Pre-requisites: MTHD 104 or clearance by test.
A general introduction to physical, chemical and biological properties of soils.

GEOG 314. WEATHER AND CLIMATE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOG 204 or 10 credits of upper division science or permission of the instructor.
Includes the principles of meteorology, description and use of instruments, weather and climate controls.

GEOG 315. SURFACE HYDROLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: mathematics clearance.
A comprehensive treatment of the hydrologic environment of the earth. Topics include: components of the hydrologic cycles, hydrography of major climate regions, water quality assessment and global water resource problems.

GEOG 317. RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION. 3 Credits.

Studies the nature and distribution of natural resources, and problems and principles of their use and conservation.

GEOG 320. MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY AND CULTURE. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: ANTH 320, HIST 320.
Examines the various ethnic, religious and national communities of the Middle East in historical and contemporary context.

GEOG 321. GIS FOR SOCIAL SCIENCES. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CPLA 101.
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with an emphasis on its applications in the Social Sciences, including census data, demographic analysis, social justice, and related mapping of social phenomena. Course includes hands-on GIS work in the lab.

GEOG 323. GIS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES. 3 Credits.

Cross listed: ENVS 323.
Pre-requisites: CPLA 101 or CPLA 120.
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with an emphasis on its application in the Environmental Sciences. Course includes hands-on GIS work in the lab This course satisfies an option for the Certificate in GIS.

GEOG 325. WETLAND SCIENCE I. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor.
An introduction to the fundamental processes that form and sustain wetlands. Emphasizes the distinctive hydrology, soils, and vegetation of wetlands and field experience in delineation. Examines issues of regulation. Focus is on Pacific Northwest wetlands.

GEOG 328. GEOGRAPHIC INFO SYSTEMS I. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Computer Literacy.
Introductory survey of geographic information systems. Focus is on (1) computer techniques for the input, storage, manipulation, analysis, and output of spatial data, and (2) the social and administrative creation and dissemination of geographic information. Lecture and laboratory.

GEOG 329. AIR PHOTO INTERPRETATION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor.
Aerial photographs as records of the earth surface; recognition, measurement, and interpretation of natural and man-made features.

GEOG 330. GEOGRAPHY OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing.
An introduction to regional geographic studies on a local scale. A survey and appraisal of the interrelated elements of the economy, resources, population and physical environment as they affect the growth and development of the region.

GEOG 332. GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing.
The study of the physical and human geography of the Americas south of the Rio Grande. Emphasizes explanatory description.

GEOG 333. GEOGRAPHY OF MONSOON ASIA. 4 Credits.

This course is a regional study of non-Russian Asia and adjacent islands, from humid monsoon lands of the far east to the arid eastern Mediterranean.

GEOG 334. THE HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF CANADA. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: HIST 334.
Canada occupies a strategic place in world geography owing to its central location with regard to Europe, Asia and the United States; its resource base, its role in regional and world organizations and the distinctive national characteristics and traditions that its peoples have developed. This course provides an overview of the major geographic regions of Canada based on physical environments, history, settlement patterns, natural resources, transportation and industry, urbanization and cultural and ethnic diversity.

GEOG 335. GEOGRAPHY OF THE PACIFIC RIM. 4 Credits.

The growing importance of the nations surrounding the Pacific Ocean in world economic development and international relations has been apparent since the early 1900s, but today, at the threshold of a new century, it is of critical importance. The destiny of the United States, and the Pacific Northwest in particular, is inextricably linked to events in such places as China, Japan, the Koreas, Indonesia, Australia, Latin America, Canada and Russia, to name but a few. This course will focus on the major trading nations of the Pacific Rim and examines their relationships with the nations of North America and each other with an approach that blends geography, economics, political science and cultural awareness.

GEOG 336. GEOGRAPHIES OF CONFLICT IN THE MIDDLE EAST. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: ANTH 336, HIST 336.
Examines the Middle East and its various ethnic, political, economic, religious and environmental conflicts from a geographic perspective. The course’s holistic combination of geographic and anthropological inquiry will offer insights into how the natural environment and built environment interact and engage with the cultural and political landscapes of the Middle East.

GEOG 355. THE GEOGRAPHY OF THEME PARKS. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Examination of the geographic history and characteristics of the theme park as a 'serious' part of the built environment. We consider the environmental, economic, political, cultural, architectural, and technological impacts of theme parks on urban and suburban space around the world.

GEOG 357. THE GEOGRAPHY OF CHILDHOOD. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Examination of the geographic aspects of childhood across space and time. Focus on how cultures in different places and at different times have created, maintained, and controlled spaces for children, including where children are born, who cares for infants, the conditions of schooling, leisure spaces provided, and the 'virtual geographies' of television and the internet.

GEOG 390. EARTH SCIENCE TEACHING METHODS. 1 Credit.

Cross listed: GEOL 390.
Pre-requisites: GEOL 120, GEOL 121, GEOG 314, PHYS 121; EDUC 303 or permission of the instructor. SCED 390 co-requisite.
This course is designed for Earth Science majors planning to teach middle school, junior or senior high school. It includes the development of curriculum and the organization of teaching materials, techniques and evaluation.

GEOG 392. SEMINAR IN HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF GEOGRAPHY. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor.
The development of geographic thought from early to contemporary time.

GEOG 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-6 Credits.

GEOG 398. SEMINAR. 2 Credits.

GEOG 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-6 Credits.

Notes: maximum of 6 credits may be earned.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor.
Individual study concerned with an appropriate problem closely directed by a geography staff member. Science or social studies credits may be earned depending on the nature of the problem undertaken.

GEOG 406. WOMEN AND MEN IN THE CULTURAL LANDSCAPE. 1 Credit.

Cross listed: WMST 406.
The created landscape reflects human values and experience. This course examines ways in which women and men create, use and experience the humanized landscape. We will examine spatial patterns of human activity from a variety of times and places, linking geographic theory to everyday environments. The course will include map work, slide analysis and a field exercise as tools for identifying and interpreting cultural landscapes.

GEOG 410. GEOMORPHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOG 100 or GEOL 121 or permission of the instructor.
This course treats the development of the surface features of the earth caused by mountain-building, weathering, erosion and deposition.

GEOG 420. APPLIED GEOGRAPHIC STUDIES. 2-5 Credits.

Notes: May be repeated for different problems.
Pre-requisites: junior or permission of the instructor.
Credits vary, depending on type of study undertaken. Problem formulation and analysis as they apply to geographic studies. Practical use of geographical techniques mainly for student-originated studies.

GEOG 427. DESKTOP MAPPING. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CPLA 101 or permission of the instructor.
Advanced production of maps and related graphics using computer techniques. Emphasis is placed on the design and creation of thematic maps. Lecture and laboratory.

GEOG 428. GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS II. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOG 328.
Advanced course in geographic informations systems and their applications. Through detailed examination of conceptual issues and in-depth laboratory work, students develop and implement a project that involves the computer analysis of spatial data. Lecture and laboratory.

GEOG 429. GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS III. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOG 428 or permission of the instructor.
Advanced course in geographic information systems and their applications. Each student will be responsible for designing and carrying out a GIS project using real world data. Course required for certification in GIS.

GEOG 436. POLITICS OF CULTURE: ISRAEL AND PALESTINE. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: ANTH 436, HIST 436.
Examines the role of culture in the political struggles between Israelis and Palestinians. Explores the influence of national, religious, ethnic and historical narratives in the conceptualization of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. This course will consider how a detailed knowledge of these ‘politics of culture’ can provide meaningful insights to potential avenues of cultural reconciliation and, ultimately, a more peaceful environment for Israelis and Palestinians.

GEOG 437. WOMEN AND ISLAM. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: ANTH 437, HIST 437, WMST 437.
Pre-requisites: junior or senior standing.
This course examines the status and identity of women in Islamic communities throughout the world and assesses how different interpretations of Islam, as a simultaneous religious, social, cultural, political and economic system, influences perceptions of women within Islamic communities. It further considers the perceptions of Islam vis-à-vis women and Islamic women themselves by non-Muslim communities.

GEOG 438. PEACE, VIOLENCE AND CULTURE. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: ANTH 438, HIST 438.
Pre-requisites: junior or senior standing.
This course is a collective exercise in critical thinking on the intersection and interaction of peace, violence and culture. It explores the cultural dimensions of peace and violence, including the role of culture in defining and understanding the manifestation and enactment of peace and violence both by and against individuals as well as groups.

GEOG 450. GLOBAL TRANSPORT DEVELOPMENT. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOG 101 or permission of the instructor.
Transportation, involving the movement of goods, people and information, is the most tangible expression of interaction between regions and places. Because it is a major force in shaping the landscape, transportation studies assume a central position in the field of geography. The creation of rapid and economical access is central to the process of development at local, regional and national scales. Changes in modes of transport, particularly since the mid-19th century, have revolutionized trade, travel and communication. The evolution of transport networks has been critical in fostering urbanization and a specialized space economy. In this course we will explore the basic concepts of geographical transportation analysis and apply them to a variety of historical and contemporary topics.

GEOG 459. POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor.
Spatial aspects of political phenomena. Examines the geographical environment as it affects and is affected by political phenomena.

GEOG 465. URBAN GEOGRAPHY: ORIGINS, FORMS AND FUNCTIONS. 3 Credits.

Urbanization has been such a central aspect of human civilization that the forces affecting cities and towns are almost as diverse as those shaping culture itself. This course in urban geography will deal with two major aspects of urbanization: the role, purpose and evolution of cities; and the processes at work in our society that both create and transform the physical structure of cities. Because urban places are central to our economy as well as society, we will consider a broad and varied range of material from other academic disciplines, with the primary focus on the North American city.

GEOG 469. BUILT ENVIRONMENTS OF NORTH AMERICA: SYMBOL AND STRUCTURE. 3 Credits.

Cross listed: HIST 469, PLAN 469.
Pre-requisites: GEOG 101 or permission of the instructor.
This course is a survey of North American architectural landscapes from the colonial period to the present. This course will examine such topics as the diffusion of major styles of residential, commercial and public architecture across the continent, the relationship of geology and climate to the availability of building materials and technology and the effects of these on the human built environment, especially in the Pacific Northwest. Special emphasis will be placed on the visual differentiation of building styles and the symbolic, political and philosophical foundations of architectural form and decoration.

GEOG 490. THE GEOGRAPHER'S CAPSTONE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing or permission of the instructor.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
This course is a departmental capstone highlighting original geographic research projects designed by students, integrating both physical and human geography topics. The course culminates in a Geography Conference that students plan and host to display their work.

GEOG 493. GIS PORTFOLIO. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOG 429 or permission of the instructor.
Exit synthesis for the certificate in GIS or related GIS studies. Students will produce two versions of a GIS portfolio highlighting their GIS work, one in hard copy and one on the web using appropriate web publishing and map serving software.

GEOG 495. INTERNSHIP IN GEOGRAPHY. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

GEOG 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

GEOG 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-15 Credits.

GEOG 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: 15 credits successfully completed in geography or permission of the instructor.
Advanced group study. Discussion topics selected for each seminar.

GEOG 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

GEOG 505. SPATIAL THEORY. 5 Credits.

This seminar focuses on the development and evolution of spatial theory both within and beyond the discipline of geography. Working from a global perspective, students explore and critically compare seminal theoretical contributions and their broader social contexts that underscore specific moments in the history of geographical studies. We investigate the ways in which contemporary western geographic thought is inseparable from the interconnected global networks within which it emerged. Original texts are used as often as possible and form the core of seminar discussion material.

GEOG 515. SPATIAL METHODS. 5 Credits.

This course provides advanced experience with the qualitative and quantitative methods of spatial research. Students research, compare and critically apply a variety of geographic methods to different case study scenarios in order to develop proficiency across the spectrum of geographic methods. Priority is given to contemporary digital methods, but older forms are introduced for comparative purposes also. Throughout the course, students build up a suite of methods they then will apply later in the program to their own research.

GEOG 521. GIS FOR SOCIAL SCIENCES. 5 Credits.

This course emphasizes the application of Geographic Information Systems in the Social Sciences, including census data, demographic analysis, social justice and related mapping of social phenomena. Course includes hands-on GIS work in the lab.

GEOG 522. RESEARCH DESIGN. 3 Credits.

Cross listed: ANTH 522.
Provides for the continued development of a practical toolkit with which to conduct applied social science research. Addresses research design elements necessary in areas such needs assessments and program evaluations through techniques such as participatory research, action research, evaluation, assessment and surveying. The course covers development of research proposals for independent, grant funded or contract designs.

GEOG 523. GIS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes the application of Geographic Information Systems in the Environmental Sciences, including mapping and analysis of topographical, hydrological, geological, biological, and other environmental data. The course includes hands-on GIS work in the lab.

GEOG 525. DATA ANALYSIS AND VISUALIZATION. 3 Credits.

Cross listed: ANTH 525.
Pre-requisites: ANTH 522 or GEOG 522.
This course introduces students to data analysis and data visualization. In particular, students will learn basic data analysis approaches, explore their use and apply them to qualitative and quantitative data sets. In addition students will synthesize the results of their data analysis into a variety of data visualization formats.

GEOG 527. DESKTOP MAPPING. 3 Credits.

This course explores the various ways that spatial information is communicated through cartographic and related methods. The course covers both contemporary theories of cartographic visualization and applied digital design strategies. Includes hands-on lab work using GIS and related mapping software.

GEOG 528. GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS I. 5 Credits.

Introductory survey of geographic information systems. Focus is on (1) computer techniques for the input, storage, manipulation, analysis and output of spatial data and (2) the social and administrative creation and dissemination of geographic information.

GEOG 531. TOPICS IN SOCIAL JUSTICE. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated for credit when topics differ.
This seminar examines the breadth of research in human geography focused on issues related to social justice. Through an intensive engagement with relevant literature, students will be exposed to a series of select historical and contemporary debates in critical human geography as we examine the ontological, epistemological and practical dilemmas concerning research driven by and concerned with social justice.

GEOG 533. TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated for credit when topics differ.
This seminar examines the breadth of research in human and physical geography focused on issues related to environmental justice. Through an intensive engagement with relevant literature and contemporary data, students will be exposed to a series of select historical and contemporary debates in critical geographic studies as we examine the ontological, epistemological and practical dilemmas concerning research driven by and concerned with environmental justice.

GEOG 536. GIS PROGRAMMING. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOG 528.
This is an advanced course in GIS programming concepts and techniques. Students will be exposed to both legacy and contemporary programming languages integrated with GIS packages. Emphasis will be on creating and interpreting scripts using languages supported by current GIS software. The course includes hands-on GIS and programming work in the lab.

GEOG 538. GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS II. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOG 528.
This course focuses on the design and implementation of geographic information system database structures. Emphasis is on the construction and analysis of contemporary and legacy vector structures, with basic exploration of raster structures. The course includes hands-on GIS work in the lab.

GEOG 548. GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS III. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOG 528 and GEOG 538.
This is an advanced course in GIS project design and execution. Students will be expected to work independently on a “real-world” GIS project based on either thesis research or an on-going project developed with a community partner. Students will oversee all stages of the project from design to data collection to presentation of results. The course is required for the GIS Certificate program.

GEOG 549. GIS PORTFOLIO. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOG 548 or permission of the instructor.
Advanced GIS course for students finishing their graduate degree and/or GIS Certificate program. This class will offer students the opportunity to review and revise previous work, arrange it into a portfolio, provide supporting documentation and metadata, and, optionally, create a web page featuring the portfolio material.

GEOG 597. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

GEOG 599. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

GEOG 600. THESIS. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
The goal of this course is the successful production of a master’s thesis of defensible quality. The master’s thesis will be the presentation of original research in the field of geography and critical GIS. This document provides partial fulfillment of the MA requirement. This course provides an opportunity to sharpen research, writing and organizational skills under the direction of the student’s graduate committee.

GEOG 601. RESEARCH PROJECT. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
The goal of this course is the successful completion of a master’s research project of defensible quality. The research project will be the culmination of applied research in the field of geography and critical GIS. This research project provides partial fulfillment of the MA requirement for student’s not pursuing the thesis track. This course provides the opportunity to sharpen research, writing, cartographic, advocacy and organizational skills under the direction of the graduate committee.

GEOG 696. COLLEGE TEACHING INTERNSHIP. 5 Credits.


Geology Courses


GEOL 100. DISCOVERING GEOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a GECR for natural sciences, geology.
This course explores the interactions between human beings and their geological environment. The earth is a dynamic planet affected by sudden, violent events such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and floods, as well as by slower processes operating over long time spans that create, move, and destroy continents and oceans. Other topics include study of energy, mineral and water resources and their importance to modern society. Topics are presented at a level intended for nonscience majors. Satisfies lab science requirement at most universities.

GEOL 115. INVESTIGATING EARTH SCIENCE. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: GEOG 115.
Pre-requisites: pre-university basic skills in mathematics.
Satisfies: a GECR for natural sciences, geology.
For students planning to teach elementary school. Includes inquiry-based earth science investigations that support science instruction outlined in the National Science Education Standards and Washington Essential Academic Learning Requirements.

GEOL 120. PHYSICAL GEOLOGY - THE SOLID EARTH. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MTHD 104 or equivalent and restricted to the following: Computer Science (BS only), Earth and Space Science, Environmental Science or Geology or by permission of the instructor.
Satisfies: the completion of GEOL 120 counts as one course for the GECR in natural sciences, geology; the completion of GEOL 120 and GEOL 121 counts as two courses for the GECRfor natural sciences, geology.
Introduction to physical geology for students interested in earth and environmental science. This course covers the origin of the earth, its internal structure and minerals, rocks and volcanoes. Earthquakes, mountains and continental drift are discussed in the context of plate tectonics. The formation of mineral deposits is also covered. Weekly laboratories and one field trip are required.

GEOL 121. PHYSICAL GEOLOGY - SURFICIAL PROCESSES. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: computer literacy, MTHD 104 or equivalent and restricted to the following: Computer Science (BS only), Earth and Space Science, Environmental Science or Geology or by permission of the instructor.
Satisfies: the completion of GEOL 121 counts as one course for the GECR in natural sciences, geology; the completion of GEOL 120 and GEOL 121 counts as two courses for the GECR for natural sciences, geology.
Introduction to physical geology for students majoring in geology, earth science or environmental science. This course emphasizes the quantitative analysis of processes that shape the earth’s surface (gravity, wind, water and ice) including weathering and erosion, the creation of sediments and sedimentary rocks and the development of landforms. Energy resources and the concept of earth systems are also explored. Weekly laboratories and one field trip are required.

GEOL 122. HISTORICAL GEOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 121.
Introduction to earth history for students majoring in geology, earth science, or environmental science. This course covers the diversity of life, catastrophic extinctions, and the effect of biologic change on the environment. The basic principles of stratigraphy, use of stable isotopes to interpret sedimentary environments, and the stratigraphic and tectonic history of the earth are also explored. Other topics include identification of the common fossil groups, survey of the fossil record in the context of geological evolution, and practice using geologic maps. Weekly laboratories and one field trip are required.

GEOL 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

GEOL 197. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 2 Credits.

GEOL 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-3 Credits.

GEOL 297. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

GEOL 299. SPECIAL STUDIES. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Topics vary with interest of student and instructor.

GEOL 311. EARTH MATERIALS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 120 and CHEM 151.
This course is an introduction to the materials that comprise the solid earth, including minerals, igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. The course includes discussions of their occurrence, associations and uses. Methods of identification are stressed during laboratory exercises.

GEOL 312. CRYSTALLOGRAPHY AND OPTICAL MINERALOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 311.
This second course of a three-course series covers how to describe the external morphology of well-formed crystals using crystallographic techniques. In addition, the techniques of optical mineralogy using a petrographic microscope are introduced as a tool for identifying rock-forming (silicate) minerals.

GEOL 313. IGNEOUS AND METAMORPHIC PETROLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 311 and GEOL 312.
The third course in a series is a comprehensive study of the classification, description, and origin of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Students will learn about the use of minerals in helping to interpret the geologic and tectonic significance of the rocks in which they are found. The course builds on skills learned in GEOL 311 and GEOL 312 and stresses hand sample and thin section descriptive techniques. Weekly laboratories as well as one weekend field trip are required. Additional field trips may be offered.

GEOL 320. ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 100, GEOL 120 or GEOL 121.
Relationship of human activities with earth materials and processes, water quality, atmospheric composition, waste disposal, natural resources, the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to environmental problems. Field trips emphasize local environmental problems. Laboratory.

GEOL 338. DISCOVERING WOMEN IN SCIENCE. 1 Credit.

Cross listed: BIOL 338, CHEM 338, HIST 338, PHYS 338, PSYC 338, WMST 338.
The course uses several scientific themes to rediscover from the past and find in contemporary research, the women who have made significant contributions to science.

GEOL 360. GEOLOGIC HAZARDS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 100, GEOL 115, GEOL 120, GEOL 121 or GEOG 100 or GEOG 115.
Introduction to geologic hazards affecting humankind; emphasis on earthquakes, volcanism, floods and landslides. Applications to geological site engineering and city/regional planning.

GEOL 380. WORLD RESOURCES AND POPULATION. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
Interaction between population and resource utilization. Renewable and non-renewable energy resources, food and water supply, soil erosion and degradation and deforestation will be related to population growth.

GEOL 390. EARTH SCIENCE TEACHING METHODS. 1 Credit.

Cross listed: GEOG 390.
Pre-requisites: GEOL 120, GEOL 121, GEOG 314, PHYS 121; EDUC 303 or permission of the instructor. SCED 390 co-requisite.
This course is designed for Earth Science majors planning to teach middle school, junior or senior high school. It includes the development of curriculum and the organization of teaching materials, techniques and evaluation.

GEOL 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-6 Credits.

GEOL 397. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

GEOL 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

GEOL 408. INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 121, GEOL 122 or permission of the instructor.
Principles of paleontology including methods of description and analyses of invertebrate fossils. Emphasis on principles of morphology and evolutionary development of invertebrates and the use of invertebrate fossils in biostratigraphy and paleoecology. Laboratory.

GEOL 411. SEDIMENTOLOGY AND STRATIGRAPHY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 122 and GEOL 311.
Study of the origin of sediments and sedimentary rocks for advanced geology majors. Description and interpretation of facies and environments of deposition and classification of clastic and chemical sedimentary rocks is emphasized. Stratigraphic principles, nomenclature and correlation is also treated. Lecture and weekly laboratory.

GEOL 425. GEOLOGY OF EASTERN WASHINGTON. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 122 or permission of the instructor.
Study of the local geology in lectures and a series of field trips. Includes field projects and techniques used during geologic mapping. Observing and recording geologic data in the field, and presenting it in terms of a written report and a sketch geologic map of a site-specific area.

GEOL 430. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY I. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 411.
Analysis of the kinematics and mechanics of rock deformation and an introduction to geologic structures. Laboratory introduces the solution of structural geology problems, the map-based interpretation of geologic structures and the creation of geologic cross sections. Weekly laboratory exercises. Designed to be taken in series with GEOL 431.

GEOL 431. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY II. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 430.
Continuation of an introduction to geologic structures from GEOL 430 and an exploration of the plate tectonic setting of geologic structures. Introduction to the field study of geologic problems with weekly field trips that emphasize the collection and analysis of geologic field data to solve structural problems. Weekly field trips and laboratory exercises required.

GEOL 455. GEOLOGY OF THE COLORADO PLATEAU. 4 Credits.

Notes: course fee.
Pre-requisites: GEOL 100 or permission of the instructor.
This course is a week-long field study of the rocks and landforms of the Colorado Plateau region, specifically in Arches and Canyonlands National Parks. Geologic evolution and structural geology of the region will be discussed and the ancient sedimentary environments of deposition will be emphasized. A field trip will be held during the week of spring break.

GEOL 462. PRINCIPLES OF GEOCHEMISTRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 311, GEOL 312, GEOL 313 or permission of the instructor.
Abundance of elements in the solar system. Origin, chemical evolution, and composition of the earth; distribution and migration of chemical elements; differentiation history of the earth into crust, mantle and core. Origin and evolution of the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Chemical processes involved in weathering of rocks, chemical sedimentation and diagenesis.

GEOL 466. ISOTOPIC TRACERS IN THE ENVIRONMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ≥2.0 in CHEM 153.
This course focuses on the principles and application of radioactive, cosmogenic and stable isotopes as environmental tracers in soil, water, atmosphere and biological materials. Topics include the variations in isotopic composition of natural materials and the processes behind these variations (e.g., fractionation, radioactive decay, mineral dissolution).

GEOL 470. HYDROGEOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 120 or GEOL 121, MATH 142, or permission of the instructor.
Relationship between groundwater and geologic materials, emphasizing quantitative analysis and principles governing groundwater flow. Lecture and weekly lab.

GEOL 475. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OF SOILS: INTRODUCTION TO GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 313, GEOL 320, GEOL 411 or GEOL 470 or permission of the instructor.
Introduction to theory and lab practice in geotechnical engineering. Content includes engineering properties of soil and rock; ASTM standard laboratory tests for particle size distribution, liquidity/plasticity, compaction, shear strength, permeability, consolidation, CBR, and others; as well as Unified Soil Classification System.

GEOL 485. GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING OF SOILS AND FOUNDATIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: GEOL 475.
This course uses the principles of rock and soil mechanics to evaluate the stability of natural and engineered slopes, aid in design of earthworks and foundations, and plan the construction of dams, levees, aqueducts and other waterworks.

GEOL 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE: GEOLOGY FIELD CAMP. 10 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior or senior standing and permission of the instructor.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
This course applies geologic principles to the solution of field problems in the Rocky Mountain fold and thrust belt. This four-week course of study includes geologic mapping, description of stratigraphic relationships, structural analysis, and GPS data collection. Maps, cross sections, and a formal report of the field study are required. Location of the camp is Dillon, Montana. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and permission of the instructor. Course fee is to be determined.

GEOL 490A. SENIOR CAPSTONE: WATER AND THE WEST, WATER RESOURCE ENGINEERING IN ARID LANDS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing.
Satisfies: senior capstone university
graduation requirement. This course focuses on the relationships between human activities and water resources in the largely arid western United States. Topics include tectonic and meteorological controls on the distribution and quantity of water, the history of conflict over scarce surface and groundwater resources, and construction dams, aqueducts, and other engineered structures to solve water scarcity problems. Case studies involve examples from the western United States and other countries including dry- land irrigation in Israel, dam building in Egypt and China, and fishery loss in Mexico.

GEOL 490B. CAPSTONE: ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: ENVS 490.
Pre-requisites: CHEM 152 or permission of instructor.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
Application of principles of geochemistry to environmental problems, including air and water pollution, water-rock interactions, weathering and soil formation. Origin, distribution and transport of inorganic contaminants in air, water, soils, sediments and plants. The behavior of trace elements in near surface environments.

GEOL 491. SENIOR THESIS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing and permission of the instructor.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
Directed research on a geological problem and organization of the results for oral and written presentation. End of program assessment will be required.

GEOL 495. PRACTICUM IN GEOLOGY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Participation in supervised experiences involving acquisition of data or applications of knowledge to help solve geologic problems. Credits earned in this course are not applicable to degree requirements.

GEOL 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-10 Credits.

GEOL 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

GEOL 498. SEMINARS. 1-5 Credits.

GEOL 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated for a total of 15 credits if a different study is undertaken each time.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Seminar in a selected field of geology to suit a student’s field of interest.

GEOL 596. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

GEOL 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

GEOL 600. THESIS. 2-10 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Thesis credit is essential to the geology program. Every student will be expected to produce a resume of his/her research in the form of a formal report or thesis.


Mathematics Courses


MATH 107. MATHEMATICAL REASONING. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MTHD 104 or MTHD 106 or equivalent course, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement test (MPT); Computer Literacy Competency recommended.
Satisfies: completion of this course with a grade ≥2.0 satisfies the university proficiencies in mathematics.
The course explores sets, basic logic, truth tables, elementary probability and statistics, geometry and the connections between mathematics and art, exponential functions, logarithms and geometric series. The spirit of the course is one of reasoning and problem solving. This is a terminal course intended for students not taking any other mathematics courses for their program of study. This proficiency may be satisfied by examination.

MATH 114. ALGEBRA CONCEPTS. 5 Credits.

Notes: completion of this course with a grade ≥2.0 or better satisfies mathematics competency.
Pre-requisites: grade ≥2.0 or better in MTHD 104, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement test (MPT).
This course provides an in depth treatment of quadratic and exponential functions. Linear and logarithmic functions are also studied and rate of change of a function is introduced. Problem solving, use of graphing tools, and quantitative and abstract reasoning are emphasized throughout the course.

MATH 121. INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MTHD 104 or MTHD 106 or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement test.
Satisfies: completion of this course with a grade ≥2.0 satisfies the university proficiencies in mathematics.
This course develops statistical literacy and the ability to think statistically, and understand how probability plays a role in statistical inference. Descriptive statistics and their graphical representations are used to summarize real and simulated data sets. Students understand how the variation present in a population affects the precision of estimates of population attributes. Confidence intervals and hypothesis testing are introduced, with an emphasis on understanding their use in context.

MATH 141. PRECALCULUS I. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 114 or equivalent course or a grade ≥3.0 in MTHD 104 or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement test (MPT).
This course includes modeling, rates of change and structure of functions; especially polynomial, rational, logarithmic and exponential. Problem solving, use of graphing tools and abstract reasoning are emphasized throughout the course.

MATH 142. PRECALCULUS II. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 141 or equivalent.
Satisfies: completion of this course with a grade ≥2.0 satisfies the university proficiencies in mathematics.
This course includes an in depth treatment of trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, identities, complex numbers, sequences, series, conic sections and mathematical induction. Polar coordinates, parametric equations and vectors are introduced. Problem solving, use of graphing tools, and quantitative and abstract reasoning are emphasized throughout the course.

MATH 161. CALCULUS I. 5 Credits.

Notes: for the university proficiencies, course may be substituted for MATH 107.
Pre-requisites: MATH 142 and ENGL 100.
A review of the concepts of functions, absolute value, open and closed intervals and solutions of inequalities. Limits, derivatives of single variable functions and their applications, anti-derivatives, the definite and integral.

MATH 162. CALCULUS II. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 161.
Applications of the definite integral, inverse functions, transcendental functions, techniques of integration, improper integrals, Taylor’s formula.

MATH 163. CALCULUS III. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 162.
Polar coordinates, a brief treatment of conic sections, vectors, in R2 and R3, parametric equations, introduction to partial differentiation, sequences and series.

MATH 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

MATH 199. SPECIAL STUDIES. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: does not count toward the 180 credit requirement.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

MATH 200. FINITE MATHEMATICS. 5 Credits.

Notes: for the university proficiencies, the course may be substituted for MATH 107.
Pre-requisites: MATH 114 or equivalent course, or a grade ≥3.0 in MTHD 104, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement test (MPT); Computer Literacy Competency recommended; ENGL 100 or placement into or above ENGL 101.
This course provides an introduction to the mathematical systems encountered in the study of the behavioral sciences and a study of matrices, linear systems, linear programming, set theory and probability.

MATH 211. STRUCTURE OF ELEMENTARY MATH I. 5 Credits.

Notes: for the university proficiencies, the completion of MATH 211 and MATH 212 may be substituted for MATH 107.
Pre-requisites: MATH 114 or equivalent course, or a 3.0 or better in MTHD 104, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement test (MPT); ENGL 100 or placement into or above ENGL 101 on the EWU Writing Test.
This course is designed to give future K–8 teachers a basis for understanding elementary school mathematics. Topics include sets, number systems, functions and relations, operations on whole numbers, decimals and fractions, integers, percents, ratio and proportions and data analysis. There is a strong emphasis on conceptual understanding and problem solving.

MATH 212. STRUCTURE OF ELEMENTARY MATH II. 5 Credits.

Notes: for the university proficiencies, the completion of MATH 211 and MATH 212 may be substituted for MATH 107.
Pre-requisites: MATH 211. The course is designed to give future K–8 teachers a basis for understanding elementary school mathematics.
Course topics include probability (including simple and complex experiments and fundamental counting principles), geometry (including relationships, symmetry and transformations) and measurement. All topics are approached from theoretical and practical  perspectives.

MATH 225. FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS. 5 Credits.

Notes: you may not receive credit for both MATH 225 and MATH 301.
Pre-requisites: MATH 161.
Provides a transition from freshman-level to higher-level mathematics and is required for higher-level courses. Topics include logic, methods of proof, set theory, relations and functions and cardinality.

MATH 231. LINEAR ALGEBRA. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 142.
Theory and practice of vector geometry in R2 and R3, systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces, bases and dimension, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, rank and nullity and applications.

MATH 241. CALCULUS IV. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 163.
Differentiation of functions of several variables, multiple integrals, vector calculus. This course should be taken immediately after MATH 163, when possible.

MATH 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

MATH 297. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 3-5 Credits.

MATH 298. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

MATH 299. SPECIAL STUDIES. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

MATH 301. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS. 5 Credits.

Notes: for the university proficiencies, the course may be substituted for MATH 107; you may not receive credit for both MATH 225 and MATH 301.
Pre-requisites: MATH 142.
This course covers the theory and application of the mathematics most relevant to computer science. Foundation topics include logic, induction and recursion, methods of proof, set theory, relations and functions, and combinatorics. Implementation topics include graphs and matrices, including systems of linear equations, two dimensional rotation matrices and matrix representations of graphs, as well as selected topics in graph theory.

MATH 307. MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING LABORATORY III. 1 Credit.

Notes: the laboratory may be repeated for credit.
Pre-requisites: successful completion of CPLA 100 and 101 or CPLA 120 and permission of the instructor.
The laboratory consists of exercises, experiments and reports, using applications, calculators or mathematical software such as Maple, Mathematica, Matlab, MINITAB, Geometer’s Sketchpad or SAS, on topics closely related to the contents of the designated concurrent mathematics course. However, the laboratory is not required by the designated course. The topics are specified in the section subtitles.

MATH 311. FUNCTIONS AND RELATIONS FOR K-8 TEACHERS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 114 or equivalent or satisfactory score on MPT; MATH 211 and MATH 212; CPLA 100 and CPLA 101 or equivalent.
A discussion of the algebraic concepts of functions and relations from numeric, graphic and symbolic viewpoints.

MATH 312. GEOMETRY FOR THE K-8 TEACHER. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 311 or permission of the instructor.
Concepts from two- and three-dimensional geometry are explored and demonstrated. The course includes geometric proofs and requires the use of technology widely used in the K–12 system (and available in the Mathematics Department).

MATH 320. HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201; MATH 225 or permission of the instructor.
A historical development of mathematical ideas and methods. Emphasizes the individuals involved, the development of the intellectual activity called mathematics and the ebb and flow of mathematics in history.

MATH 331. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS WITH APPLICATIONS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 225 or both MATH 161 and MATH 301.
Graph theory, chaos theory and fractals, combinatorics, combinatorial game theory and the surreal numbers. Selected applications for each topic.

MATH 332. NUMBER THEORY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 225.
Arithmetic in different bases, fundamental theorem of arithmetic, modular arithmetic, Wilson's and Fermat's theorems, RSA codes, perfect numbers, linear and quadratic congruences, quadratic reciprocity, Pythagorean triples, Gaussian integers and arithmetic in other settings, Fermat's last theorem and the method of descent.

MATH 341. TOPICS IN APPLIED ANALYSIS I. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: for MATH 341: MATH 163; for MATH 342 and MATH 343: MATH 241.
Selected topics in applied mathematics such as vector analysis, complex variables, partial differential equations, etc.

MATH 342. TOPICS IN APPLIED ANALYSIS II. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 241.
Selected topics in applied mathematics such as vector analysis, complex variables, partial differential equations, etc.

MATH 343. TOPICS IN APPLIED ANALYSIS III. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: for MATH 341: MATH 163; for MATH 342 and MATH 343: MATH 241.
Selected topics in applied mathematics such as vector analysis, complex variables, partial differential equations, etc.

MATH 347. INTRODUCTORY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 163.
An introduction to ordinary differential equations, a nonrigorous, problem-solving approach including Laplace transforms and Fourier series with  applications.

MATH 370. SURVEY OF GEOMETRIES. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CPLA 100 and CPLA 101 or equivalent; and MATH 225.
Introduction to various finite and infinite geometries, both Euclidean and non-Euclidean. The logical notions of consistency, independence, interpretation and models and completeness will be explored. Properties and theorems of each geometric system will be developed synthetically, analytically and through use of technology.

MATH 380. ELEMENTARY PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS. 5 Credits.

Notes: for the university proficiencies, course may be substituted for MATH 107.
Pre-requisites: MATH 141 or Mathematics Proficiency Clearance, Computer Literacy Competency recommended.
Empirical and theoretical frequency distributions. Discrete and continuous random variables. The binomial random variable and the normal. Descriptive statistics including measures of location, spread and association. An introduction to inferential statistics including confidence intervals and hypothesis testing.

MATH 385. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICAL INFERENCE I. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 163 and MATH 225 or permission of the instructor.
This course introduces mathematical theory of probability and statistical inference. This includes proofs of simple theorems, applications of probability to real world problems, discrete and continuous random variables and their probability distributions, sampling distributions and the central limit theorem, basic properties of estimators including bias, constructions of confidence intervals and hypothesis tests.

MATH 387. REGRESSION CONCEPTS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 385.
This course is designed to provide an introduction, development and applications of regression concepts including Type 1 and Type 2 errors, statistical power, p-values, t-tests, F-tests, linear and polynomial regression, stepwise regression and the relationship between correlation and regression. Technology will be used throughout the course.

MATH 395. CO-OP FIELDWORK. 1-5 Credits.

MATH 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

MATH 399. SPECIAL STUDIES IN MATH. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

MATH 401. ADVANCED FORMAL LOGIC. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHIL 301 or math equivalent and successful completion of ENGL 101 and recommended placement above MTHD 104 on the mathematics placement test or MTHD 104 or equivalent.
Advanced study of formal deductive systems. Develops predicate logic on a rigorous basis, establishes some important metatheorems for logical systems and introduces some concepts in semantics and issues in the philosophy of logic.

MATH 407. MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING LABORATORY IV. 1 Credit.

Notes: the laboratory may be repeated for credit.
Pre-requisites: successful completion of successful completion of CPLA 100 and 101 or CPLA 120 and permission of the instructor.
The laboratory consists of exercises, experiments and reports, using applications, calculators or mathematical software such as Maple, Mathematica, Matlab, MINITAB, Geometer’s Sketchpad or SAS, on topics closely related to the contents of the designated concurrent mathematics course. However, the laboratory is not required by the designated course. The topics are specified in the section subtitles.

MATH 411. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS FOR K-8 TEACHERS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 161 or MATH 311.
This course introduces the elementary mathematics major to the process of doing mathematics via mathematical proofs and mathematical reasoning. Throughout the course, familiar topics will be approached in a less intuitive, more formal way and in greater depth than previously experienced. Topics to be covered include logic; sets, functions and sequences; methods of proof; and combinatorics.

MATH 413. DATA ANALYSIS AND PROBABILITY FOR MIDDLE LEVEL TEACHERS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 212 and MATH 311; MTED 390 and MTED 412.
Through readings, discussion and a hands-on problem-centered approach, students will develop a profound understanding of concepts of data analysis and probability. Students will deepen their understanding of the research on the teaching and learning of data analysis and probability in K–9 mathematics.

MATH 416. CALCULUS FOR MIDDLE LEVEL TEACHERS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 141 or MATH 311.
This course is intended for pre-service middle school teachers and focuses on conceptual and procedural understandings of limit, continuity, differentiation and integration. It includes the techniques and applications of calculus and use of technology to explore and represent fundamental concepts of calculus.

MATH 420. PROBLEM SOLVING FOR K-8 TEACHERS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MTED 390 (or math teaching experience) and MATH 311 or equivalent course approved by the department and CPLA 100 and CPLA 101 or the equivalent.
This math content course for prospective K–8 teachers requires students enrolled in the class to solve a large variety of problem-solving problems using a variety of strategies including the use of manipulatives, technology and mathematical representations. Techniques for teaching problem solving are discussed in the course. The use of a variety of types of technology is a required component of the course.

MATH 430. ADVANCED LINEAR ALGEBRA. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 225 and MATH 231.
This course provides an advanced study of linear algebra. Topics will be Jordan decomposition, inner product spaces, hermitian operators. Applications to other branches of mathematics, physics and chemistry will be included.

MATH 431. APPLIED GROUP THEORY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 225 and MATH 231.
Groups, cyclic and permutation groups, cosets and Lagrange’s theorem, Cayley graphs, group actions, counting theorems with applications, tilings and groups of symmetries with applications.

MATH 432. RINGS AND POLYNOMIALS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 225 and MATH 231.
Binary operations and algebras, rings and polynomials, factor rings and ideals, integral domains and fields (both finite and infinite), factor theorems, prime, irreducible and unique factorizaton, power series and differential operators, applications including computer algebra techniques, digital communication and encryption.

MATH 433. GALOIS THEORY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 432.
Field theory, splitting fields, Galois groups, fundamental theorem of Galois theory, applications to classical problems of Euclidean constructibility and solvability by radicals, applications of the theory to encryption and digital communication.

MATH 444. NUMERICAL LINEAR ALGEBRA. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior, senior or graduate standing; MATH 161 and MATH 231.
This course develops numerical linear algebra and error estimates essential for scientific computing: machine arithmetic, algorithms for solving systems of linear equations, algorithms for computing eigenvalues and singular values (LU, QR, Jacobi's and SVD) and the theory of error estimates through condition numbers and backward analysis. The course also includes such topics as the design and analysis of algorithms for floating-point arithmetic, linear regression, orthogonal linear regression, linear programming, or cubic splines, with applications to engineering and the sciences. Typical applications are Google PageRank, Kalman filtering, data compression and image processing with wavelets. This course requires the use of computers and software available at EWU.

MATH 445. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior or higher standing; MATH 444.
The course combines numerical linear algebra with numerical differentiation and integration to derive methods of scientific computing: numerical differentiation and integration, existence, uniqueness, stability and numerical approximation of solutions to nonlinear systems and of ordinary or partial differential equations, splines and fast Fourier or wavelet transforms. The course also includes such applications to engineering and the sciences as the design and analysis of algorithms to compute special functions, computed geometric design, fluid dynamics, heat diffusion or financial Black-Scholes models, image processing or nonlinear regression.

MATH 447. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 225, MATH 231 and MATH 347.
This course is an advanced study of ordinary differential equations focusing on linear and nonlinear systems, with analytical, qualitative, and numerical methods of solution including Euler's method, matrix exponential, stability, phase plane analysis, linearization, Lyapunov functions, existence and uniqueness and applications. This course provides experience with mathematical software.

MATH 448. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 225 and either MATH 347 or MATH 444.
This course is an advanced study of partial differential equations via boundary value problems and Fourier series representations, centered on classical and numerical solutions of the heat equation, wave equation, advection equation and Laplace equation, introductory finite differences, modeling applications and use of technology through mathematical software. Selected topics may include Bessel's inequality, energy methods, existence and uniqueness, eigenfunction expansions and integral transforms.

MATH 460. CONTINUOUS FUNCTIONS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 163 and MATH 225.
The course lays out the foundations for calculus and analytical geometry; the course develops the topology of the n-dimensional real Euclidean space. Topics include the completeness of the real numbers, topological spaces, continuity and properties preserved by continuous functions: compactness and connectedness.

MATH 461. ADVANCED CALCULUS I. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 241 and MATH 460.
This course applies notions from linear algebra and continuous functions to develop the calculus of functions of several variables. Topics include differentiability, the derivative as a linear transformation, extreme value problems and the implicit and inverse function theorems.

MATH 462. ADVANCED CALCULUS II. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 461.
This course builds on topics introduced in MATH 461, and develops integration with differential forms. Topics include line integrals, exterior algebra and a general form of Stokes’s theorem; the course includes selected applications to algebraic topology and fluid dynamics, if time permits.

MATH 470. FOUNDATIONS OF GEOMETRY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 225 and MATH 231 or concurrent enrollment.
The course includes the study of Euclidean and non-Euclidean isometries. Selected topics in advanced geometry stressing applications to other branches of mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology will be explored.

MATH 481. COMPLEX ANALYSIS. 5 Credits.

Notes: MATH 225 and MATH 460 are recommended.
Pre-requisites: MATH 163.
The course proves relations between derivatives, integrals along curves, Maclaurin series, and singularities of complex-valued functions of a complex variable, in particular, theorems of Abel, Cauchy-Goursat, Green, Laurent, Liouville, Morera, Riemann and Rouch {\'{e}}. Applications include the solution of Laplace's partial differential equation by Green's functions (Cauchy's and Poisson's integral formulae) or Fourier Transforms. Detailed proofs of theorems also provide a theoretical foundations for the corresponding theorems from calculus with one or two variables: differentiation and integration of power series and Fourier series, differentiation relative to parameters of integrals along curves and the fundamental theorem of algebra.

MATH 485. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICAL INFERENCE II. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 231, MATH 241 and MATH 385 or permission of the instructor.
This course covers a variety of statistical methods for research in the natural sciences, including analysis of variance, multiple regression, general linear models and nonparametric statistical procedures. One or more additional topics will be selected by the students in consultation with the instructor teaching the course. Use of statistical software will be emphasized.

MATH 486. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICAL INFERENCE III. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 485 or permission of the instructor.
This course covers advanced topics in probability and statistical inference including discrete and continuous multivariate distributions, moment generating functions, proof of the central limit theorem, properties of estimators including efficiency and sufficiency, best linear unbiased estimators (BLUE), maximum likelihood estimation, the Neyman-Pearson lemma and likelihood ratio tests. The course concludes with a practical student-project component in which students apply methods learned to the analysis of a real-world data set.

MATH 491. SENIOR THESIS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 231, MATH 241, MATH 347, MATH 385, MATH 460.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
This course provides students with an opportunity to research a mathematical topic and present their findings in writing and orally.

MATH 492. PROBLEM SOLVING SEMINAR. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 225 or permission of the instructor; MATH 380 or MATH 385.
The course examines various problem solving strategies and techniques for teaching problem solving at the secondary level such as direct proof, indirect proof, inferences, mathematical representations and the use of technology.

MATH 494. SENIOR SEMINAR. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: for students pursuing the BA in Mathematics: prior or concurrent enrollment in MATH 462 and MATH 432; for students pursuing the BAE Secondary: prior or concurrent enrollment in MATH 432 and MTED 493.
The Senior Seminar course will explore the culture of mathematics through readings and classroom discussions. The students will be required to write a paper on some aspect of mathematics. At the same time, students will review the core mathematics they have studied and comprehensive tests will be administered in order to assess the knowledge they have acquired in their degree programs.

MATH 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

MATH 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Selected topics to be arranged in consultation with the requesting organization.

MATH 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

MATH 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

MATH 507. MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING LABORATORY. 1 Credit.

Notes: the laboratory may be repeated for credit.
Pre-requisites: concurrent enrollment in or prior credit for a 500-level mathematics course designated by the Department of Mathematics each academic term.
The laboratory consists of exercises, experiments and reports, with applications or calculators or with such mathematical software as Maple, Mathematica, Matlab, MINITAB, Geometer’s Sketchpad or SAS, on topics closely related to the contents of the designated concurrent mathematics course. However, the laboratory is not required by the designated course. The topics are specified in the section subtitles.

MATH 510. NUMBER SENSE FOR TEACHERS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
Through readings, discussion and a hands-on problem-centered approach, students will develop a profound understanding of the concepts of numeration systems, base ten and place value, operations, fractions, decimals, percents, integers, real numbers and number theory and will deepen their understanding of the research on the teaching and learning of these topics in K–9 mathematics. Major emphases will be learners’ cognitive development through and across different grade levels, including that of diverse and exceptional learners, typical student conceptions and misconceptions, meaningful use of representations and technology in developing understanding and state and national standards related to these number-sense topics.

MATH 511. RATIO AND PROPORTION - TEACHERS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
Through readings, discussion and a hands-on problem-centered approach, students will develop a profound understanding of the concepts of ratio and proportion and deepen their understanding of the research on the teaching and learning of ratio and proportion in K–9 mathematics. Major emphases will be learners’ cognitive development through and across different grade levels, including that of diverse and exceptional learners, typical student conceptions and misconceptions, meaningful use of representations and technology in developing understanding and state and national standards related to ratio and proportion.

MATH 512. GEOMETRIC REASONING - TEACHERS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
Through readings, discussion and a hands-on problem-centered approach, students will develop a profound understanding of geometry concepts and deepen their understanding of the research on the teaching and learning of geometry concepts in K–9 mathematics. Major emphases will be learners’ cognitive development through and across different grade levels, including that of diverse and exceptional learners, typical student conceptions and misconceptions, meaningful use of representations and technology in developing understanding and state and national standards related to geometry.

MATH 513. DATA ANALYSIS AND PROBABILITY FOR TEACHERS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
Through readings, discussion and a hands-on problem-centered approach, students will develop a profound understanding of concepts of data analysis and probability and deepen their understanding of the research on the teaching and learning of data analysis and probability in K–9 mathematics. Major emphases will be learners’ cognitive development through and across different grade levels, including that of diverse and exceptional learners, typical student conceptions and misconceptions, meaningful use of representations and technology in developing understanding and state and national standards related to data analysis and probability.

MATH 514. ALGEBRAIC REASONING - TEACHERS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
Through readings, discussion and a hands-on problem-centered approach, students will develop a profound understanding of algebraic reasoning and deepen their understanding of the research on the teaching and learning of algebraic reasoning in K–9 mathematics. Major emphases will be learners’ cognitive development through and across different grade levels, including that of diverse and exceptional learners, typical student conceptions and misconceptions, meaningful use of representations and technology in developing understanding and state and national standards related to algebraic reasoning.

MATH 515. MEASUREMENT FOR TEACHERS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
Through readings, discussion and a hands-on problem-centered approach, students will develop a profound understanding of measurement concepts and deepen their understanding of the research on the teaching and learning of measurement in K–9 mathematics. Major emphases will be learners’ cognitive development through and across different grade levels, including that of diverse and exceptional learners, typical student conceptions and misconceptions, meaningful use of representations and technology in developing understanding and state and national standards related to measurement.

MATH 516. CALCULUS FOR MIDDLE LEVEL TEACHERS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing and MATH 311 or equivalent.
This course is intended for middle school teachers and focuses on conceptual and procedural understandings of limit, continuity, differentiation and integration. It includes the techniques and applications of calculus and use of technology to explore and represent fundamental concepts of calculus. It also addresses the historical development of calculus and the contributions to its development from many cultures. Students will create a project focusing on connections between calculus, the middle school curriculum and current understandings of how students learn  mathematics.

MATH 528. PROBLEM-CENTERED LEARNING. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
This course explores how to create classroom environments where rich tasks form the basis for mathematical learning. Special emphasis will be placed on task construction, selection and problem-posing. Participants will engage in a series of non-routine problem-solving activities. They will also be expected to develop non-routine problem-solving activities addressing specific mathematical ideas. These activities will serve as a basis for examining and reflecting on the research about and the implications of such an approach to the teaching and learning of mathematics.

MATH 531. ALGEBRA I. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 431 or permission of the instructor.
The theory of groups, starting at the Sylow Theorems. Topics: group actions, normal series, solvable and nilpotent groups, structure theorem for abelian groups, semidirect products, extensions.

MATH 539. SEMINAR IN SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-5 Credits.

MATH 573. TOPICS IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS. 4 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated for credit.
Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
The course focuses on the mathematics of applications, depending on the interests of the class and the instructor. Topics will be specified in the section subtitle.

MATH 581. COMPLEX ANALYSIS I. 4 Credits.

This course establishes the basic properties of holomorphic functions, including complex derivatives, power series, singularities, residues and the general integral formula of Cauchy. In particular, the course proves such classical results as the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, the Open Mapping Theorem, the Maximum Principle and the theorems of Weierstrass, Montel or Looman-Menchoff. This course also presents examples of elementary conformal mappings, with optional applications to cartography or physics, from geometric or analytic points of view.

MATH 582. COMPLEX ANALYSIS II. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 581.
Continues MATH 581 through the proofs of advanced results, such as the general Riemann Mapping Theorem, or properties of the special functions of Riemann and Weierstrass. If time permits, may include application to Algebraic Geometry, Number Theory and Coding or extensions to several complex variables, for example.

MATH 596. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

MATH 597. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: only one workshop course for up to 3 credits may be used to fulfill graduate degree requirements.

MATH 598. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor.

MATH 599. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

MATH 600. THESIS. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
A research thesis under the direction of a graduate committee.

MATH 601. RESEARCH REPORT. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
A research study in lieu of a bound thesis conducted as partial fulfillment of a master's degree in education under the direction of a graduate committee.

MATH 696. COLLEGE TEACHING INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Teaching a lower-division college course under supervision of a regular faculty member. Includes course planning, arranging bibliographical and instructional aids, conferences with students, experience in classroom instruction and student course evaluation.


Physics Courses


PHYS 100. PHYSICAL SCIENCE I. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: pre-university basic skills in mathematics.
Satisfies: a GECR for natural sciences, physics.
Course covers the elementary aspects of physical science and astronomy. It operates in an informal laboratory mode with ample opportunity for discussion and individual assistance. No mathematics beyond basic arithmetic is used.

PHYS 115. INVESTIGATING PHYSICAL SCIENCE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 211.
Satisfies: a GECR for natural sciences, physics.
For students planning to teach elementary school. Includes inquiry based physical science investigations that support science instruction outlined in the National Science Education Standards and Washington Essential Academic Learning Requirements.

PHYS 121. DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: pre-university basic skills in mathematics.
Satisfies: a GECR for natural sciences, physics.
This course follows the development of astronomy from the earth-centered model of the early Greeks through the sun-centered model of Copernicus to the modern dynamic model of the universe incorporating the known laws of physics in its description. Topics covered in this development include a study of the solar system and a brief description of the physical laws used in astronomy. Additional topics such as distances, motions properties and evolution of stars lead to a study of galaxies, the structure of the universe and to modern cosmological models. Laboratory activities include naked-eye observation and measurement, planetarium sessions, Celestial Globe activities, computer simulations, as well as experiments in optics, spectra and the use of telescopes.

PHYS 131. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS I. 4 Credits.

Notes: Each course consists of 4 credits of lecture and 1 credit of required instrumentation laboratory.
Pre-requisites: MATH 142, concurrent enrollment in PHYS 161 for PHYS 131 is recommended; PHYS 131 for PHYS 132; and PHYS 132 for PHYS 133.
Satisfies: The completion of PHYS 131, PHYS 161 satisfies the GECR for natural sciences, physics; counts as one course. The completion of PHYS 131, PHYS 132, PHYS 161, plus any one of the following: PHYS 162, PHYS 163, PHYS 164 satisfies the GECR for natural sciences, physics; counts as two courses.
These courses are designed primarily for science students with mathematical preparation through algebra and trigonometry. No calculus is used. The topics covered are PHYS 131–kinematics, dynamics, conservation of momentum and energy and simple harmonic motion; PHYS 132–sound/waves, heat/thermo-dynamics, geometric optics; PHYS 133–electricity and magnetism, physical optics, modern physics.

PHYS 132. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS II. 4 Credits.

Notes: Each course consists of 4 credits of lecture and 1 credit of required instrumentation laboratory.
Pre-requisites: MATH 142, concurrent enrollment in PHYS 161 for PHYS 131 is recommended; PHYS 131 for PHYS 132; and PHYS 132 for PHYS 133.
Satisfies: The completion of PHYS 131, PHYS 161 satisfies the GECR for natural sciences, physics; counts as one course. The completion of PHYS 131, PHYS 132, PHYS 161, plus any one of the following: PHYS 162, PHYS 163, PHYS 164 satisfies the GECR for natural sciences, physics; counts as two courses.
These courses are designed primarily for science students with mathematical preparation through algebra and trigonometry. No calculus is used. The topics covered are PHYS 131–kinematics, dynamics, conservation of momentum and energy and simple harmonic motion; PHYS 132–sound/waves, heat/thermo-dynamics, geometric optics; PHYS 133–electricity and magnetism, physical optics, modern physics.

PHYS 133. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS III. 4 Credits.

Notes: Each course consists of 4 credits of lecture and 1 credit of required instrumentation laboratory.
Pre-requisites: MATH 142, concurrent enrollment in PHYS 161 for PHYS 131 is recommended; PHYS 131 for PHYS 132; and PHYS 132 for PHYS 133.
Satisfies: The completion of PHYS 131, PHYS 161 satisfies the GECR for natural sciences, physics; counts as one course. The completion of PHYS 131, PHYS 132, PHYS 161, plus any one of the following: PHYS 162, PHYS 163, PHYS 164 satisfies the GECR for natural sciences, physics; counts as two courses.
These courses are designed primarily for science students with mathematical preparation through algebra and trigonometry. No calculus is used. The topics covered are PHYS 131–kinematics, dynamics, conservation of momentum and energy and simple harmonic motion; PHYS 132–sound/waves, heat/thermo-dynamics, geometric optics; PHYS 133–electricity and magnetism, physical optics, modern physics.

PHYS 151. GENERAL PHYSICS I. 4 Credits.

Notes: the completion of PHYS 151, PHYS 161 satisfies the GECR for natural sciences, physics; counts as one course.
Pre-requisites: Concurrent enrollment in MATH 161. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 161 is recommended.
Part of a four-quarter beginning sequence ( PHYS 151, PHYS 152, PHYS 153, PHYS 221) suitable for all students of natural science and mathematics. Topics covered include: one and multi-dimensional kinematics and dynamics, energy and momentum and oscillations.

PHYS 152. GENERAL PHYSICS II. 4 Credits.

Notes: the completion of PHYS 151, PHYS 152, PHYS 161, plus any one of the following: PHYS 162, PHYS 163, PHYS 164 satisfies the GECR for natural sciences, physics; counts as two courses.
Pre-requisites: PHYS 151 and concurrent enrollment in MATH 162.
Part of a four-quarter beginning sequence ( PHYS 151, PHYS 152, PHYS 153, PHYS 221) suitable for all students of natural science and mathematics. Topics covered include: rotational motion, gravity, fluids, waves and thermodynamics.

PHYS 153. GENERAL PHYSICS III. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHYS 152 and concurrent enrollment in MATH 163.
Part of a four-quarter beginning sequence ( PHYS 151, PHYS 152, PHYS 153, PHYS 221) suitable for all students of natural science and mathematics. Topics covered include: electrostatics, direct current circuit theory, magnetism and geometric optics.

PHYS 161. MECHANICS LABORATORY. 1 Credit.

A laboratory course in mechanics, including one-dimensional motion, motion in a plane, dynamics, conservation of energy and momentum, and oscillating motion.

PHYS 162. HEAT AND OPTICS LABORATORY. 1 Credit.

A laboratory course suitable for use with either Introductory and General Physics. Experiments in optics include reflection and refraction, lenses and mirrors, microscopes and telescopes, optical spectra and microwave optics. Experiments in heat include heat and temperature, thermal expansion, mechanical and electrical equivalents of heat and a study of gas laws.

PHYS 163. INSTRUMENTATION LAB I. 1 Credit.

This laboratory emphasizes the use of electronic instruments in the measurement of physical quantities.

PHYS 164. INSTRUMENTATION LAB II. 1 Credit.

This laboratory emphasizes the use of electronic instruments in the measurement of physical quantities.

PHYS 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

PHYS 221. GENERAL PHYSICS IV. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHYS 153.
Part of a four-quarter beginning sequence (PHYS 151, PHYS 152, PHYS 153, PHYS 221) suitable for all students of natural science and mathematics. Topics covered include: electromagnetism, alternating current circuit theory, Maxwell's equations, physical optics, quantization, and nuclear physics.

PHYS 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

PHYS 299. SPECIAL STUDIES. 1-5 Credits.

PHYS 321. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB I. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor.
A laboratory course dealing with classical experiments in all of physics as well as introducing many modern measurement techniques in atomic and nuclear physics.

PHYS 322. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB II. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor.
A laboratory course dealing with classical experiments in all of physics as well as introducing many modern measurement techniques in atomic and nuclear physics.

PHYS 338. DISCOVERING WOMEN IN SCIENCE. 1 Credit.

Cross listed: BIOL 338, CHEM 338, GEOL 338, HIST 338, PHYS 338, PSYC 338.
The course uses several scientific themes to rediscover from the past and find in contemporary research, the women who have made significant contributions to science.

PHYS 361. CLASSICAL MECHANICS I. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHYS 153, MATH 163.
A study of statics and dynamics from a mathematical point of view; an introduction to Lagrange's Equations.

PHYS 362. CLASSICAL MECHANICS II. 4 Credits.

A study of statics and dynamics from a mathematical point of view; an introduction to Lagrange's Equations.

PHYS 363. SPECIAL RELATIVITY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHYS 153, MATH 162.
An introduction to Einstein's theory of special relativity and its application to particle dynamics.

PHYS 371. INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 163, PHYS 221.
An introduction to the origin and development of quantum theory with emphasis on the classical experiments leading to Schroedinger's wave mechanics and applications of Schroedinger's Equation to simple systems.

PHYS 381. ATOMIC PHYSICS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHYS 371.
A study of the application of quantum theory to the description of the periodic table, to the interpretation of atomic and molecular spectra, and to the behavior of x-rays.

PHYS 390. PHYSICS TEACHING METHODS. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: successful completion or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 132 or PHYS 152 and EDUC 341 and enrollment in a co-requisite SCED 390.
This course is for physics majors planning to teach junior or senior high school. Topics will include: organization of lesson materials, techniques, resources, and evaluation.

PHYS 395. CO-OP FIELDWORK. 1-5 Credits.

PHYS 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-6 Credits.

PHYS 401. ELECTROMAGNETISM I. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 163, PHYS 221.
A study of electric forces, fields, potentials, dielectric behavior, currents, magnetic forces, and electromagnetic waves.

PHYS 402. ELECTROMAGNETISM II. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 163, PHYS 221.
A study of electric forces, fields, potentials, dielectric behavior, currents, magnetic forces, and electromagnetic waves.

PHYS 403. ELECTROMAGNETISM III. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 163, PHYS 221.
A study of electric forces, fields, potentials, dielectric behavior, currents, magnetic forces, and electromagnetic waves.

PHYS 411. CLASSICAL THERMODYNAMICS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHYS 153, MATH 163.
Introduction to elementary thermodynamics; first, second and third laws of thermodynamics; ideal gases; and kinetic theory.

PHYS 424. ASTROPHYSICS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHYS 153, MATH 163.
Application of the physical principles of mechanics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics, and relativity within the astronomical contexts of observational techniques/instrumentation, planetary science, stellar structure/evolution, galactic/extragalactic structure, and cosmology. Computer-based laboratory exercises in orbital motions, rotational motion, photometry, and spectroscopy are included.

PHYS 431. SOLID STATE DEVICES PHYSICS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 163, PHYS 221.
A course dealing with crystalline semiconductors, carrier transport generation and recombination, p-n junctions, metal-semiconductor junctions, microwave devices, photonic devices like solar cells and semiconductor lasers.

PHYS 441. SOLID STATE PHYSICS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHYS 431.
A course dealing with the quantum properties of electrons in solids, mechanisms of electron and hole conduction, and the theory of operation of solid state devices.

PHYS 451. OPTICS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 163, PHYS 153.
A study of the nature of light and its applications, with emphasis on physical optics and the electromagnetic wave theory of light. Topics selected from modern optics include Fourier optics, basics of coherence theory, and aspects of the quantum nature of light.

PHYS 461. NUCLEAR PHYSICS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHYS 381.
A continuation of PHYS 381 which deals with properties of the nucleus, laws of radioactivity, nature of radiation, nuclear, X- and gamma rays, and nuclear reactions.

PHYS 495. INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean

PHYS 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

PHYS 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-6 Credits.

PHYS 498. SEMINAR. 1-2 Credits.

PHYS 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean

PHYS 596. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-5 Credits.

PHYS 597. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

PHYS 598. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

PHYS 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

PHYS 696. COLLEGE TEACHING INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.