Chicano Education

This is an archived copy of the 2015-2016 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ewu.edu.

Elisa Facio, Program Director
203 Monroe
509.359.2404


Faculty

Norma Cardenas, Elisa Facio, Martin M. Garcia.


Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Undergraduate Minors


Undergraduate Program

The Chicana/Chicano Education Program (CEP) employs a dual mission at Eastern Washington University (EWU). The program’s first mission is to significantly contribute toward enhancing opportunities for the participation of Chicano and Latino students in higher education. This mission is achieved by vigorously recruiting Chicano and Latino students, and providing the essential support needed for experiencing a positive and successful academic career at Eastern Washington University. A parallel CEP mission is augmenting EWU’s goal in addressing diversity by providing all students, regardless of ethnicity, with a critical Chicano/Latino Studies curriculum resulting in a comprehensive and holistic understanding and appreciation of Chicano and Latino communities. Furthermore, CEP is committed to enacting initiatives that sustains the Program’s dual mission. The Chicana/Chicano Education Program is therefore structurally divided into three distinct program components.

Recruitment

The Chicana/Chicano Education Program’s student recruitment efforts involve various activities aimed at encouraging Chicano and Latino students to pursue educational opportunities at EWU. Specific recruitment activities include visiting high schools and community colleges; staging university based student visitations; participating in educational and community career fairs; utilizing Spanish media (radio, television and newspapers) to disseminate information about educational opportunities at EWU, networking with Chicano/Latino community organizations and other recruitment-focused initiatives.

Support Services

The Chicana/Chicano Education Program also provides a variety of academic and non-academic support services for students. Such services include academic advising, scholarship information and scholarships, mentor relationships, culturally based initiatives, linkages for tutoring needs, a college orientation class and other related student support services. More specifically, CEP assists student transition into the university by advocating on the students’ behalf with other university departments and offices (i.e., Admissions Office, Financial Aid, Housing and Residential Life). Additionally, CEP assists students in becoming familiar with university regulations and practices.

The Chicana/Chicano Education Program also houses the CAMP program (College Assistance Migrant Program), which is designed to recruit and retain migrant students during their first year of college at EWU. The CAMP program provides an array of comprehensive and essential academic support services and financial assistance for CAMP student participants.

Chicano Studies

CEP offers a Chicana/Chicano Studies academic minor designed to provide all students, regardless of ethnicity, a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and critical understanding and appreciation of Chicano and Latino communities. CEP focuses primarily on Chicano and Latino historical experiences of colonization and neo-colonization, economic and cultural contributions to US society, and historical and contemporary struggles, movements, and strategies of survival.

CEP’s Chicana/Chicano Studies offerings include lower and upper division coursework. The Chicana/Chicano Studies minor provides students with an inclusive and interdisciplinary understanding of the Chicano and Latino experience in the U.S. Specifically, the minor prepares students for the rapidly changing demographic trends in the U.S. and provides critical knowledge and skills necessary to contribute to a racially and culturally diverse society. In tandem with this approach, CEP offers a rigorous academic program of study that prepares students for graduate and professional schools, the work force, and employment in community based organizations or the non-profit industrial complex. While the minor is especially suited for those students applying to graduate school, teaching in K-12, educational administration including counseling psychology, social services positions, business, educational, and community organizing, the minor is appropriate for all major fields of study given the discipline’s interdisciplinary foundation. Chicanos and Latinos are now the largest racial ethnic group in the nation, and the Chicana/Chicano Studies minor will provide all students with an appreciation of the history, political, social, and cultural realities of Chicanos and Latinos in contemporary American society.

Please refer to the required courses and course descriptions section for additional information about CEP’s Chicana/Chicano Studies curriculum.

Other CEP Activities

CEP is committed to networking and establishing contacts with all communities throughout the state of Washington with a particular focus on educational related issues, initiatives, and policies. CEP’s outreach efforts include public seminars, lectures and cultural and art exhibitions. The program also publishes and disseminates throughout the US an electronic quarterly newsletter, Q-VO, which informs students and the community about CEP activities. On a national level, CEP actively participates with the National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies, a professional academic association, which promotes research and teaching relevant to the Chicana/Chicano community.

Required courses in the following program of study may have prerequisites. Reference the course description section for clarification.


Chicano Studies Courses


CHST 101. INTRODUCTION TO CHICANO CULTURE. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: ANTH 161.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
A study of Chicano culture providing an initial overview of its roots and conflicts. Specific components discussed are cultural identity, customs, language, psychology and the arts.

CHST 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

Experimental

CHST 197. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-3 Credits.

Workshop, short course, conference.

CHST 199. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Directed Study

CHST 201. LATINAS/OS IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN SOCIETY. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: ANTH 201.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
The course examines the experience of the other Latinos (Hispanics) in the United States: Puerto Rican, Cuban American and Central Americans. The course presents a brief historical overview of their entrance in American Society and a demographic comparison of significant socio-economic variables of the groups. The primary focus of the course is to examine the social and cultural profile of the Puerto Rican, Cuban and Central American groups in the U.S. The course covers historical, social and cultural themes, which include the impact of American institutions on identity, culture, language, the family and the future implications of immigration from Latin America.

CHST 218. CHICANO HISTORY. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: HIST 218.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
This course offers a study of Chicano history from the time of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, to the present. Specific themes discussed include the Mexican American War, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo of 1848, the economic, political and social conditions after the Anglo-American conquest of the southwest, Mexican immigration to the U.S., Chicano labor history, the Chicano movement and other Chicano themes.

CHST 230. CHICANAS AND LATINAS IN THE U.S.. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHST 101 or ANTH 161.
This course provides a description and analysis of the experience of Chicanas and Latinas in the United States. First, the course presents a review of Chicana studies scholarship and the evolution of Chicana feminist theory. Next, the course examines the historical, cultural, political and social-economic themes which define the experience of Chicanas/Latinas in the United States.

CHST 297. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Workshop, short course, conference.

CHST 300. SURVEY OF CHICANO LITERATURE. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: ENGL 498 (may be cross-listed).
Notes: CHST 101 or CHST 218 recommended.
This course will offer students an overview of the historical development and current trends in Chicano Literature. The course will focus on the literary forms of poetry, novel, and the short story. The class will give students an understanding of various theoretical approaches utilized in critically analyzing literary works. Students will be expected to read, discuss, and apply theoretical techniques on specific Chicano literary works.

CHST 310. LATINAS/OS IN THE U.S. MEDIA. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHST 101, CHST 218, ANTH 161 or HIST 218 or permission of instructor.
This course surveys how Latinos and Latinas have been depicted in film, news, television and other media formats in the United States. The first section of the course examines Hollywood depictions of the Latino/a experience in the film industry from the early period of U.S. cinema to contemporary representations as well as the depiction of US Latinos/as in Mexican cinema. The second section examines the depictions of Latinos/as in television and the news. Finally, the course presents the emergence of Chicano cinema from the early documentary to the full length dramatic feature.

CHST 320. CHICANO-LATINO POLITICS IN AMERICA. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: POLI 350 (may be cross-listed).
Notes: CHST 101 or CHST 218 recommended.
The purpose of this course is to study the political reality of Latinos in the United States: a heterogeneous group made up largely of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban American origin and others (Central and South Americans). The focus taken in this class is to look at the Latino population in terms of its orientation to the political system, its institutions and actors and their participation in the electoral process. The course will examine the political orientation of the Latino community towards power, authority, role of government and actions taken by governmental bodies and linkages to political participation. Overall, the goal of the course is for students to have a better understanding of the political experience of the second largest racial/ethnic group in the United States.

CHST 330. LATINO IMMIGRATION TO THE U.S.. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHST 101, CHST 218, ANTH 161, HIST 218 or permission of the instructor.
This course is a historical overview of Latino immigration from Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. Special attention is given to the largest Latino sub groups in the United States. This course examines the social phenomenon of labor migration and immigration from Latin America and places it in the context of political economic national inequalities. Themes covered in the course include the transnational character of Latino immigrants, the political economy of immigration, the social and cultural impact of immigrants in the U.S. Latino communities and the transnational economic links between the sending and receiving communities.

CHST 331. LATINO FAMILY IN THE U.S.. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CHST 101, CHST 218, ANTH 161, HIST 218 or permission of the instructor.
This course presents an overview of the general direction of current scholarship on the Chicano/Latino family, with a special focus on basic familial structure and the dynamics of change. First, the course examines traditional interpretations and methodologies and suggests alternative theoretical perspectives. Second, the course examines research issues such as familism, machismo, gender roles, parenting, divorce, family violence, aging, immigration and family, and public policy on family life.

CHST 340. LATINA/O COMMUNITIES IN THE U.S.: FIELD RESEARCH IN CHICANA/O, LATINA/O STUDIES. 5 Credits.

The course is designed to accomplish three objectives. First it presents a typology of the diverse experience of Latina/o Communities in the US. Second, it provides a critical review of theories and methods utilized in the study of the Chicano-Latino experience in the US. Third it incorporates a field research component whereby students apply the theories and methods examined in the course.

CHST 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

Experimental

CHST 398. SEMINARS. 1-5 Credits.

Seminar

CHST 420. READINGS IN DECOLONIZATION. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: IDST 420.
Pre-requisites: IDST 101 and CHST 101 or ANTH 161.
This course grounds students in the theory and concepts of colonization, decolonization and indigenous peoples in America, with brief comparisons with global indigenous peoples and experiences. Through that theoretical understanding, students examine and formulate ways in which decolonization can impact and be integrated into indigenous lives and communities in a meaningful way.

CHST 495. INTERNSHIP/PRACTICUM. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

CHST 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSES. 1-5 Credits.

Experimental

CHST 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Chicano topics discussed from various disciplines including the humanities and social sciences.

CHST 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
An in-depth, independent research project.