Chicano-Latino Studies, Minor

This is an archived copy of the 2015-2016 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ewu.edu.

The minor in Chicano and Latino Studies will provide all students regardless of ethnicity with a comprehensive and interdisciplinary understanding of Chicano and Latino communities through its Chicana/Chicano Studies course offerings. For example, lower division courses such as Introduction to Chicana/Chicano Culture, Latinas/Latinos in Contemporary American Society and Chicana/Chicano History encourage students to develop valid concepts and generalizations regarding Chicano and Latino life conditions in the U.S. Upper division courses expand on aspects of Chicano and Latino experiences. Students are expected to understand how the intersectionality of class, race, gender and sexuality shape and/or influence Chicano/Latino communities. These courses include Chicano/Latino Politics in America, Survey of Chicana/Chicano Literature, Latina/Latino Communities in the United States, and Field Research in Chicano and Latino Studies. The minor will enhance the academic preparation of students planning to pursue graduate studies, professional school, teaching from elementary to post-secondary levels, as educational counselors and administrators, social service agents, and occupations in the non-profit sector.

This minor does not meet a state of Washington endorsement.

Required Courses
CHST 101INTRODUCTION TO CHICANO CULTURE5
or CHST 201 LATINAS/OS IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN SOCIETY
CHST 218CHICANO HISTORY5
CHST 300SURVEY OF CHICANO LITERATURE5
CHST 320CHICANO-LATINO POLITICS IN AMERICA5
CHST 340LATINA/O COMMUNITIES IN THE U.S.: FIELD RESEARCH IN CHICANA/O, LATINA/O STUDIES5
or CHST 499 DIRECTED STUDY
Total Credits25

Student Learning Outcomes—students will

  • effectively demonstrate competence in oral, written and/or visual media in presenting research findings;
  • demonstrate competence with analyzing contemporary and global issues and how they affect the Chicana/o experience;
  • demonstrate an understanding of Chicana/o peoples’ diversity as it pertains to race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, immigrant status, age, region and educational background;
  • demonstrate and articulate how Chicano Studies’ training and experience can be applied to various job opportunities;
  • demonstrate and articulate an understanding of Chicana and Chicano Studies as an interdisciplinary field of inquiry
  • exercise critical, interdisciplinary thinking in order to adequately problem-solve;
  • demonstrate an understanding of the role that activism and struggle have and continue to play in building a Chicana/o consciousness and ideologies of empowerment and transformative social change.