Military Science

This is an archived copy of the 2015-2016 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ewu.edu.

LTC Jason M. Pape, Chair
202 Cadet Hall
509.359.2386


Faculty

MSG Jacob Baty, CPT Wyatt C. Ottmar, LTC Jason M. Pape, Robert H. Riedel MAJ.


Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Undergraduate Minors


Undergraduate Program

The Department of Military Science offers a four year curriculum in leadership, both theoretical and practical. The program’s purpose is to produce future Officers for the Army, Active Duty, Reserves and National Guard. Students learn the fundamentals of leadership and then progress through increasingly difficult leadership responsibilities in order to improve individual levels of proficiency. The program incorporates many other life skills such as time management, oral and written communication, problem solving, comprehensive fitness, first aid and adventure training..

The Department of Military Science is synonymous with the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program. The program consists of two types of students - enrolled and contracted. Enrolled students are those that are exploring ROTC and considering the Army as an option after graduation. They can do so without commitment or obligation to the Army.  Contracted students are also enrolled, but they have signed a contract to continue in the program and become a commissioned Officer in the United States Army after graduation. Students who wish to contract as a Cadet must meet medical, physical and military screening standards. The program requires class attendance, leadership labs, off-campus training and may include internship opportunities. Both a major and a minor are offered by the department.

ROTC is traditionally a four-year program and consists of two phases: the Basic Course (usually completed during the freshman and sophomore years or obtained through lateral entry credit) and the Advanced Course (usually completed during the junior and senior years). Students with prior service, current members of the Army Reserve or National Guard , and college students who attend a lateral entry summer camp are eligible to waive portions of the lower division courses (Basic Course) and complete the program in as little as two years. Graduate students are also eligible to enroll, participate, and contract in ROTC, with the same opportunities to abbreviate their leader development timeline.

Basic Course

(MS I/MS II) The Basic Course is open to all EWU students interested in basic leadership skills and training without any military obligation. The freshman 100-level courses is 2 credit hours and consists of a one-hour classroom session and a two hour leadership laboratory (three hours weekly). The sophomore 200-level course is 3 credit hours and consists of a two hour classroom session and a two hour leadership laboratory (four hours weekly). The Basic Course focus is on leader development and small group dynamics combined with basic military training which offers students personal challenges and the opportunity to explore ROTC. Development of critical thinking and problem solving skills and improvement of oral and written communication skills in a variety of situations provide students an environment within which to become a better leader and influencer. Between their sophomore and junior year, students may attend a four-week course at Fort Knox, KY to catch up if they have not completed all of the Basic Course requirements. Students are also afforded the opportunity to apply and compete for on-campus ROTC two- and three-year scholarships throughout their time in the Basic Course if they plan on contracting with the U.S. Army as an EWU ROTC Cadet. Interested students DO NOT incur any military obligation by simply applying for a scholarship.

Advanced Course

(MS III/MS IV) Upon completion of the Basic Course or equivalent, students (Cadets) may be eligible for entrance into the Advanced Course. Eligible students must be selected by the ROTC Cadre prior to enrollment in the Advanced Course. The Advanced Course is a two-year curriculum consisting of classroom instruction, leadership training, physical fitness training, military field exercises and a variety of training opportunities in the Regular Army. The Advanced Course focus is on small unit leader development, problem solving, planning and decision making, and critical and creative thinking, while completing increasingly complex military missions. The junior 300-level courses prepare Cadets to succeed as individuals and as leaders at the squad and platoon level in preparation for summer training and assessment. Junior level students attend a 29-day Cadet Leader Course (CLC) at Fort Knox, Kentucky, usually during the summer between their junior and senior years. While attending CLC, students (Cadets) are paid for their time at the course and for round-trip travel expenses. The senior 400-level courses prepare Cadets to succeed as a junior Army Officer as they plan and lead all ROTC training events for the program. Completion of the Advanced Course qualifies the Cadet to apply and compete for a commission in the United States Army, either on Active Duty, in the Army Reserves or in the Army National Guard.

Financial Assistance

Each contracted Cadet receives a tax-free stipend allowance of $300–$500 a month for up to ten months a year. There are also cooperative programs with the Army Reserves and Army National Guard that could provide additional funds for tuition and fees, plus monthly drill pay and the ROTC stipend for MS II, III and IV students. Students who join the Army Reserves or Army National Guard and finish Basic Training and Advanced Individual Training (AIT) also qualify for the Montgomery GI Bill ($317/month per academic year). The amount of financial assistance available each year changes based on Congressional mandates.

Scholarships

The ROTC program offers two-, three-, and four-year scholarships for eligible students. Every scholarship provides full tuition, $1200 annual allowance for books and class fees and a tax-free stipend of $300 per month for contracted freshmen, $350 per month for sophomores, $450 per month for juniors and $500 per month for seniors during the academic school year.

Four-Year National Scholarship Program

Interested students apply during their senior year of high school at www.goarmy.com/rotc. This process is also open to students enrolled in Running Start.  The application deadline for high school seniors is January 10 of each year. Interested applicants DO NOT incur any military obligation by simply applying for a scholarship. Interested students should contact the EWU ROTC Scholarship Officer at 509.359.6110 or call nationwide 1.800.USA.ROTC.

Two and Three Year On-Campus Scholarship Program

This program is open to qualified students already enrolled in ROTC at EWU. Interested students DO NOT incur any military obligation by simply applying for a scholarship. Contact the EWU ROTC Scholarship Officer at 509.359.6110 to apply.

Extracurricular Activities

Special Qualification Training: Advanced Course and select Basic Course students may participate in confidence-building schools such as Air Assault, Airborne, Northern Warfare, Mountain Warfare, Cultural Language Program (CULP) and Cadet Troop Leader Training (CTLT). There are also special internships available for students interested in science, engineering and medical fields.

Color Guard: The Eastern Washington University ROTC Color Guard participates in a variety of school and civic functions where precision drill or presentation of the United States Flag is required.

Ranger Challenge: ROTC Cadets compete annually in a military skills and fitness competition with other schools in the region. This program is designed for those Cadets interested in challenging themselves mentally and physically while learning to operate as a member of a team.

Intramural Sports: The Department of Military Science sponsors teams which participate in basketball, volleyball, softball and other sports of the EWU Intramural program. Uniforms and equipment are provided by the Department of Military Science.

Required courses in the following programs of study may have prerequisites. Reference the course description section for clarification.


Military Science Courses


MLSC 101. BASIC MILITARY SKILLS I. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: permission of the department chair.
MLSC 101 introduces students to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective military leadership. Students learn how the personal development of life skills such as time management, physical fitness, and stress management relate to leadership, Officership, and Army operations. Focus is placed on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army Leadership Dimensions while gaining a big picture understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student.

MLSC 102. BASIC MILITARY SKILLS II. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: permission of the department chair.
MLSC 102 presents an overview of leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback and using effective writing skills. Students explore dimensions of leadership values, attributes, and competencies in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises. Cadre role models and the building of stronger relationships among the students through common experience and practical interaction are critical aspects of the MLSC 102 experience.

MLSC 103. BASIC MILITARY SKILLS III. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: permission of the department chair.
This course builds on the fundamentals developed in MLSC 101 and MLSC 102. It focuses on learning problem solving and decision making processes. Students continue to be placed in various small group leadership situations that demand decisions to ethical and moral problems. Cadre role models and the building of stronger relationships among the students through common experience and practical interaction are critical aspects of the MLSC 103 experience.

MLSC 104. BASIC MILITARY SKILLS LAB. 1 Credit.

Notes: this course is repeatable.
Pre-requisites: MLSC 101 or MLSC 102 or MLSC 103 concurrently.
This lab is focused on basic military skills such as land navigation, first aid, the Army Warrior Task Training tasks (CTT), weapons marksmanship as well as the development of leadership, stressing the practical application of leadership principles, techniques, styles and responsibilities. Students also participate as a member of a team or as a leader of the team given responsibility for accomplishment of given tasks. MS I students operate as members of a team.

MLSC 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

MLSC 201. BASIC MILITARY TEAM BUILDING I. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the department chair.
MLSC 201 explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership framework (trait and behavior theories). Students practice aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing and assessing team exercises. Focus is on continued development of the knowledge of leadership attributes and core leader competencies through an understanding of Army rank, structure, duties and basic aspects of land navigation and squad tactics. Case studies provide tangible context for learning the Soldier’s Creed and Warrior Ethos as they apply in the contemporary operating environment (COE).

MLSC 202. BASIC MILITARY TEAMBUILDING II. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the department chair.
MLSC 202 examines the challenges of leading tactical teams in the complex contemporary operating environment (COE). The course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling and operations orders. Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army Leadership Requirements Model explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations in a constantly changing world and applies these challenges to practical Army leadership tasks and situations.

MLSC 203. BASIC MILITARY TEAM III. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the department chair.
MLSC 203 provides a horizontal transition into MLSC 301. Students develop greater self awareness as they assess their own leadership styles and practice communication and team-building skills. COE case studies provide insight into the importance and practice of teamwork and tactics in real-world scenarios.

MLSC 204. BASIC MILITARY TEAM BUILDING LAB. 1 Credit.

Notes: this course is repeatable.
Pre-requisites: MLSC 201 or MLSC 202 or MLSC 203 concurrently.
This lab is focused on basic military skills such as land navigation, first aid, the Army Warrior Task Training tasks (CTT), weapons marksmanship as well as the development of leadership, stressing the practical application of leadership principles, techniques, styles and responsibilities. Students also participate as a member of a team or as a leader of the team given responsibility for accomplishment of given tasks. MS II students are being prepared to be evaluated as leaders and share in leadership roles.

MLSC 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

MLSC 299. INDIVIDUAL STUDIES. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Topics are mutually agreed upon by students and the instructor

MLSC 301. MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS I. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the department chair.
MLSC 301 challenges students to study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of Army leadership, Officership, Army values and ethics, personal development, and small unit tactics at the team and squad level. Each student, by the end of the course, will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a team or squad in the execution of a tactical in a field environment. In addition, MS III students rotate through a variety of leadership positions that support ROTC battalion training and recruiting events. The MS III student receives detailed and constructive feedback on their leader attributes and core leader competencies.

MLSC 302. MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS II. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MLSC 301.
MLSC 302 challenges students to continue in the study, practice, and application of Army leadership, Officership, Army values and ethics, personal development, and small unit tactics at the team and squad level. Each student will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a team or squad in the execution of a tactical in a field environment. MS III students rotate through a variety of leadership positions that support ROTC battalion training and recruiting events throughout the quarter. The MS III students receive detailed and constructive feedback on their leader attributes and core leader competencies.

MLSC 303. MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS I. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MLSC 302
MLSC 303 is the final review of advanced land navigation techniques, communication and small unit tactics in preparation for the thirty day summer Leadership Development and Assessment Course Camp (LDAC)(MLSC 307) at Fort Lewis, Washington. MS III students rotate through a variety of leadership positions that support ROTC battalion training and recruiting events. The MS III student receives detailed and constructive feedback on their leader attributes and core leader competencies.

MLSC 304. MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS LAB. 2 Credits.

Notes: this course is repeatable.
Pre-requisites: completion of ROTC Basic Course (MLSC 100 and 200 series) or department chair approval required.
An advanced training exercise in the development of leadership, that stresses the practical application of leadership principles, techniques, styles and responsibilities, focusing on planning, resourcing and execution. Students are responsible for the evaluation, counseling and mentoring of 10 to 30 subordinates and team members.

MLSC 307. LEADERSHIP DEVELOMENT AND ASSESSMENT. 8 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the department chair.
The summer following their junior year, cadets attend the Leadership Development and Assessment Course (LDAC), a five-week Course at Ft. Lewis, WA. It is designed to evaluate a cadet’s leadership abilities while providing additional leadership and individual skills instruction.

MLSC 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

Experimental Course

MLSC 399. INDIVIDUAL STUDIES. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Topics are mutually agreed on by the student and the instructor

MLSC 401. MILITARY SCIENCE AND OFFICERSHIP I. 2 Credits.

The MLSC 401 course transitions the focus of student learning from being trained, mentored and evaluated as an MS III Cadet to learning how to train, mentor and evaluate underclass Cadets. MS IV Cadets will learn the duties and responsibilities of an Army staff officer and apply the Military Decision Making Process (MDMP), Army writing style and the Army’s principles of training and training management cycle during weekly training meetings to plan, execute and assess battalion training events. Cadets will learn about the special trust proposed by the U.S. Constitution to Army Officers; a trust above and beyond other professions. Cadets will learn Army values and ethics and how to apply them to everyday life as well as in the Contemporary Operating Environment. The MS IV Cadet will learn about the officer’s role in the Uniform Code of Military Justice, counseling subordinates, administrative actions and methods on how to best manage their career as an Army Officer.

MLSC 402. MILITARY SCIENCE AND OFFICERSHIP II. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MLSC 401.
This course continues MLSC 401 instruction on how to train, mentor and evaluate subordinates. MS IV Cadets function as a Cadet staff officer and apply the Military Decision Making Process (MDMP), Army writing style and the Army’s principles of training and training management cycle during weekly training meetings to plan, execute and assess battalion training events.

MLSC 403. MILITARY SCIENCE AND OFFICERSHIP III. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MLSC 402.
This is the final course a Cadet takes prior to commissioning and graduating. MSL IV Cadets complete their last quarter as a Cadet staff officer and apply the Military Decision Making Process (MDMP), Army writing style and the Army’s principles of training and training management cycle during weekly meetings. Cadets apply the special trust as they transition to Army Officers. Cadets live Army values and ethics and apply them to everyday life. The MS IV Cadet continues to learn about the officer’s role in the Uniform Code of Military Justice, counseling subordinates, administrative actions and methods on how to best manage their career as an Army Officer.

MLSC 404. MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS IV LAB. 2 Credits.

Notes: this course is repeatable.
Pre-requisites: permission of the department chair.
This course is an advanced training exercise in the development of leadership, stressing the practical application of leadership principles, techniques, styles and responsibilities. It focuses on leadership planning, resourcing and execution. MS IV Cadets plan and execute training exercises for the Basic Course Cadets and assist the cadre in the execution and evaluation of the MS III students.

MLSC 490. MILITARY LEADERSHIP SENIOR CAPSTONE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MLSC 307 and senior standing; or permission of instructor.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
This course is a senior-level seminar designed to integrate and further refine the analytical, writing, and presentation skills acquired as a Military Science major and Army Officer. The course covers case studies and analyses of actual leadership examples from past and present military exercises and engagements. Students prepare and present an original, extensive case study and analysis of military leadership, if possible relating to the student’s actual assignment in the Active or Reserve Component of the Armed Forces.

MLSC 495. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Provides practical military experience through participation in a work experience program. Requires a detailed written report. The program is mutually agreed upon by students and instructor.

MLSC 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

MLSC 499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Topics are mutually agreed on by students and the instructor