Undergraduate Degree

This is an archived copy of the 2015-2016 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ewu.edu.



General requirements for the baccalaureate degree at Eastern include all of the following: 

Minimum Credits—180 cumulative credit hours

  • 60 upper-division credits (300 level or above)
  • 45 credits in residence (attendance) at Eastern, with at least 15 upper-division credits in major in residence at Eastern

Note: credits earned in MTHD 103, MTHD 104MTHD 106MATH 199, CPLA 100 and ENGL 100 do not count toward the 180 cumulative credits.

Minimum Cumulative GPA ≥2.0

  • for Eastern Washington University course work
  • for all General Education Core Requirements and University Graduation Requirements
  • in major program, subject to departmental requirements
  • in minor program, subject to departmental requirements

Note: general education and graduation requirements are waived for a student possessing a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution who wishes to obtain an additional undergraduate degree from Eastern.


General Education Requirements

All Eastern Washington University students are expected to acquire a liberal education. Eastern defines liberal education to include:

  • intellectual skills and habits of mind necessary to the pursuit and transmission of knowledge;
  • a broad understanding of the history, institutions and traditions that most profoundly influence our social, political, economic, aesthetic and scientific lives;
  • specialized knowledge in a discipline (major).

EWU has designed the General Education Curriculum for the purpose of preparing students with the skills, habits of mind and breadth of subject matter that characterize an educated person. Through this curriculum, Eastern ensures that all students encounter the core academic disciplines, especially as they apply to major questions of our times.


University Competencies and Proficiencies

Refer to the depart./program listing for recommended computer literacy, English composition and mathematics courses.

Computer Literacy

The computer literacy competency requirement may be satisfied by successful completion of a computer literacy examination or completion of the course (or courses) required as a result of the computer literacy examination with a grade ≥2.0. These courses may be CPLA 100 (graded pass/no credit only) and CPLA 101 or CPLA 120. Credit for CPLA 100 does not count toward total graduation credits.

English Composition

All students must complete ENGL 201 or its transferable equivalent with a minimum grade ≥2.0.

Students may be placed into English Composition courses by several means. All Running Start students must take the English Composition Program’s Writing Placement Test to determine their placement. Students may be placed using their SAT critical reading (formerly verbal) scores, their ACT English scores, or their toefl scores, if available. Students who do not have an SAT critical reading score, an English ACT score, or a toefl score and who did not complete the English Language Institute (ELI) program must take the Writing Placement test to determine placement. Transfer students may be placed into a course if they have transferred equivalent composition courses to Eastern. Finally, they may take the Writing Placement test if they do not have test scores and have not transferred any composition credits. (For A.P. credit see page 21 of the catalog.)

SAT critical reading scores

  • 440 or below must meet with a general academic advisor to determine placement
  • between 450 and 590 will be placed in ENGL 101
  • 600 and above will be placed in ENGL 201

ACT English scores

  • 17 or below must meet with a general academic advisor to determine placement
  • 18–27 placed in ENGL 101
  • 28 or above placed in ENGL 201

TOEFL

  • all students must have a 525 or above on the TOEFL exam.
  • below 67 on the paper based test, or below 29 on the internet-based test, placed in ENGL 112
  • at or above 67 on paper based test, or 29 and above on the internet based test, the student will be placed in ENGL 101.

Mathematics

The general education mathematics proficiency requirement may be satisfied by any one of the following: placement into MATH 161, as a result of the math placement test and successful completion of the Mathematical Reasoning Exam or completion of any of the following courses or its transferable equivalents with ≥2.0 minimum grades.

MATH 107MATHEMATICAL REASONING5
MATH 121INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS5
MATH 142PRECALCULUS II5
MATH 161CALCULUS I5
MATH 200FINITE MATHEMATICS5
MATH 211
MATH 212
STRUCTURE OF ELEMENTARY MATH I
and STRUCTURE OF ELEMENTARY MATH II
10
MATH 301DISCRETE MATHEMATICS5
MATH 380ELEMENTARY PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS5
or BIOL 380 DATA ANALYSIS FOR BIOLOGISTS

Students who need additional math development may be required, on the basis of the math placement test results, to complete MTHD 103 and/or MTHD 104.


General Education Core Requirements (GECR)

  • All students without an approved Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA) degree must complete eight general education core requirements (GECRs) totaling at least 36 credits.
  • A requirement can be completed by a single approved course of no fewer than 3 credits.
  • These courses are designed to provide introductory knowledge, intellectual skills and habits of thought found in the core disciplines of the humanities and fine arts, the social sciences and the natural sciences.
  • Students must complete two GECR courses from one breadth area and three GECR courses from each of the other two breadth areas below for a total of eight GECR courses. Students should complete university competencies and proficiencies prior to completion of the GECRs.
  • Individual courses may require specific prerequisites. Check the catalog course descriptions for more information.

Humanities and Fine Arts (2 or 3 courses)

Students must choose one course per list from each of two or three lists below.

Note: HUMN 290, may be used to satisfy List 1, 2 or 3 and typically is only offered summer term.

List 1: Literature
ENGL 170INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE5
GNML 212MODERN WORLD MASTERPIECES5
HUMN 210CLASSICS IN LITERATURE5
HUMN 211MASTERPIECES OF THE WEST WORLD5
HUMN 290ARTS AND IDEAS5
SPAN 170INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE5
List 2: Fine Arts
ART 213ART IN THE HUMANITIES5
or HONS 213 ART IN THE HUMANITIES
or HUMN 213 ART IN THE HUMANITIES
FILM 214FILM AND THE HUMANITIES5
HUMN 290ARTS AND IDEAS5
MUSC 212MUSIC IN THE HUMANITIES5
or HUMN 212 MUSIC IN THE HUMANITIES
THTR 202THEATRE IN THE HUMANITIES5
or HUMN 202 THEATRE IN THE HUMANITIES
List 3: Philosophy and Reasoning
FINC 200PERSONAL FINANCE: PHILOSOPHY AND PRACTICE4
HUMN 215INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION5
HUMN 270GREAT WORLD VIEWS5
HUMN 290ARTS AND IDEAS5
PHIL 210CRITICAL THINKING5
PHIL 211INTRODUCTORY PHILOSOPHY5
PHIL 212INTRODUCTORY ETHICS5
PHIL 213MORAL ISSUES IN AMERICA5
Open only to admitted Honors Program students
HONS 101THE INTELLECTUAL TRADITION: THE ANCIENT WORLD (counts as one Social Science GECR; one Humanities GECR)8
HONS 102THE INTELLECTUAL TRADITION: MIDDLE AGES THROUGH THE REFORMATION (counts as one Social Science GECR; one Humanities GECR)8

Social Sciences (2 or 3 courses)

Students must choose one course per list from each of two or three lists below.

List 1: Economics and Government
ECON 100GENERAL EDUCATION ECONOMICS5
ECON 200INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS 15
ECON 201INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS 15
POLI 100MODERN GOVERNMENT IN AMERICAN CONTEXT5
List 2: Anthropology, Geography, Psychology and Sociology
ANTH 101CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY5
CMST 208MASS MEDIA AND THE INFORMATION SOCIETY5
GEOG 101FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 25
PSYC 100GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY5
PSYC 201LIFE-SPAN DEVELOPMENT4
SOCI 101INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY5
List 3: History
AAST 220AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY: POST CIVIL WAR TO PRESENT5
or HIST 220 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY: POST CIVIL WAR TO PRESENT
or HONS 220 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY: POST CIVIL WAR TO PRESENT
HIST 105WESTERN HERITAGE: ORIGINS TO THE 18TH CENTURY5
HIST 106WESTERN HERITAGE: 18TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT 25
HIST 110AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: A SURVEY 25
MGMT 200BUSINESS HISTORY IN THE U.S.4
Open only to admitted Honors Program students
HONS 101THE INTELLECTUAL TRADITION: THE ANCIENT WORLD (counts as one Social Science GECR; one Humanities GECR)8
HONS 102THE INTELLECTUAL TRADITION: MIDDLE AGES THROUGH THE REFORMATION (counts as one Social Science GECR; one Humanities GECR)8
HONS 103MODERN SCIENCE AND SOCIETY (counts as one Social Science GECR and with HONS 104 counts as one Natural Science GECR)8
1

This economics sequence is designed for majors in economics, business or science.

2

Elementary Education candidates are strongly recommended to select from these courses as the content is directly related to Washington State Elementary Endorsement and exit exam requirements.

Natural Sciences (2 or 3 courses)

Students must complete courses from at least two of the lists below.

Biology
BIOL 100INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY5
BIOL 115INVESTIGATING BIOLOGY 15
Chemistry
CHEM 121CHEMISTRY AND ITS ROLE IN SOCIETY5
Envronmental Science
ENVS 100INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE5
Geography
GEOG 100FUNDAMENTALS OF THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT5
GEOG 115INVESTIGATING EARTH SCIENCE 15
or GEOL 115 INVESTIGATING EARTH SCIENCE
GEOG 204ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT5
Geology
GEOL 100DISCOVERING GEOLOGY5
GEOL 115INVESTIGATING EARTH SCIENCE 25
or GEOL 115 INVESTIGATING EARTH SCIENCE
Physics
PHYS 100PHYSICAL SCIENCE I5
PHYS 115INVESTIGATING PHYSICAL SCIENCE 15
PHYS 121DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY5
Open only to admitted Honors Program students
HONS 103
HONS 104
MODERN SCIENCE AND SOCIETY
and HONORS NATURAL SCIENCE LAB (with HONS 104 counts as one Natural Science GECR; HONS 103 alone counts as one Social Science GECR)
9
1

Elementary Education candidates are strongly recommended to select from these courses as the content is directly related to Washington State Elementary Endorsement and exit exam requirements.

Science courses that are offered as part of sequences designed for students majoring in science and related areas will apply to the GECR requirements. The first course and lab completed will fulfill one GECR requirement and the second course in the sequence will fulfill a second GECR requirement in the same subject area. If a student chooses to take two courses from the same subject area, a third course from a different subject area must be chosen for a total of three science courses.

Biology
BIOL 171
BIOL 270
BIOLOGY I
and BIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION
8
BIOL 172BIOLOGY II (if BIOL 171 and BIOL 270 are completed) 15
BIOL 172
BIOL 270
BIOLOGY II
and BIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION
8
BIOL 232
BIOL 233
BIOL 234
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY NON-BIOL MAJORS
and HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY NON-BIOL MAJORS
and HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY NON-BIOL MAJORS
15
Chemistry
CHEM 151GENERAL CHEMISTRY5
CHEM 152GENERAL CHEMISTRY5
CHEM 161GENERAL CHEMISTRY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES5
CHEM 162ORGANIC CHEMISTRY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES5
Geology
GEOL 120PHYSICAL GEOLOGY - THE SOLID EARTH5
GEOL 121PHYSICAL GEOLOGY - SURFICIAL PROCESSES5
Physics 2
PHYS 131
PHYS 161
INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS I
and MECHANICS LABORATORY
5
PHYS 132
PHYS 162
INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS II
and HEAT AND OPTICS LABORATORY
5
PHYS 132
PHYS 163
INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS II
and INSTRUMENTATION LAB I
5
PHYS 132
PHYS 164
INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS II
and INSTRUMENTATION LAB II
5
PHYS 132
PHYS 161
INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS II
and MECHANICS LABORATORY (if PHYS 131 and PHYS 161 were not completed)
5
PHYS 151
PHYS 161
GENERAL PHYSICS I
and MECHANICS LABORATORY
5
PHYS 152
PHYS 162
GENERAL PHYSICS II
and HEAT AND OPTICS LABORATORY
5
PHYS 152
PHYS 163
GENERAL PHYSICS II
and INSTRUMENTATION LAB I
5
PHYS 152
PHYS 164
GENERAL PHYSICS II
and INSTRUMENTATION LAB II
5
PHYS 152
PHYS 161
GENERAL PHYSICS II
and MECHANICS LABORATORY (if PHYS 151 and PHYS 161 were not completed)
5
1

Progression through this series requires a ≥1.7 in BIOL 171 and a ≥2.0 in BIOL 172, BIOL 173 and BIOL 270.

2

With permission, other appropriate physics labs may be substituted for PHYS 163 or PHYS 164.


University Graduation Requirements

These requirements apply to all undergraduate students who do not have baccalaureate degrees. While general education, in the form of competencies, proficiencies and content-rich survey courses, typically occupies the student’s first two years, liberal education continues to color and challenge every student’s intellectual journey toward graduation. The following requirements may be satisfied through the courses listed or transferable equivalents:

Foreign Language Requirement for Bachelor of Arts Candidates

Two years of one single language in high school or one year of a single language in college. Eastern offers these languages: American Sign Language, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Salish and Spanish.

Major/Minor or Certificate Requirement

A minor or certificate is required for any major with fewer than 60 credits. See the department/program section of this catalog for detailed course and graduation requirements.

Senior Capstone/Thesis Graduation Requirement

ITGS 400 or for some majors, students may fulfill this requirement by completing a departmental capstone/thesis course. Check with the chair of the major department.


Requirement—Cultural and Gender Diversity in the U.S. and International Studies 

Select 8 credits—4 credits minimum from the Cultural and Gender Diversity in the U.S. List and 4 credits minimum from the International Studies List.

  • Courses and experiences will be designed to provide knowledge and understanding of the cultural diversity of the United States and other societies and cultures of the world.
  • Second year or more advanced language study for 4–5 credits or 10 credits of approved (Japanese) first-year language study may satisfy the International Studies requirement. American Sign Language is excluded from fulfilling the International Studies Requirement.

Cultural and Gender Diversity List

AAST 214AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE AND EXPRESSIONS5
or HUMN 214 AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE AND EXPRESSIONS
or HONS 214 AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE AND EXPRESSIONS
AAST 215EARLY AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY: ANCIENT AFRICA TO THE END OF THE RECONSTRUCTION 18775
or HIST 215 EARLY AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY: ANCIENT AFRICA TO THE END OF THE RECONSTRUCTION 1877
or HONS 215 EARLY AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY: ANCIENT AFRICA TO THE END OF THE RECONSTRUCTION 1877
ADST 308CULTURAL ISSUES IN ADDICTION TREATMENT AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH4
ANTH 201LATINAS/OS IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN SOCIETY5
or CHST 201 LATINAS/OS IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN SOCIETY
ANTH 355INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA5
or HONS 355 INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA
ANTH 432ANTHROPOLOGY OF GENDER4
or WMST 432 ANTHROPOLOGY OF GENDER
ART 310WORLD ART5
ART 311AFRICAN AND AFRICAN AMERICAN ART HISTORY5
or HUMN 311 AFRICAN AND AFRICAN AMERICAN ART HISTORY
CHST 101INTRODUCTION TO CHICANO CULTURE5
or ANTH 161 INTRODUCTION TO CHICANO CULTURE
CMST 314GENDER AND COMMUNICATION5
CMST 340INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION5
COMD 201DISABILITY AND COMMUNICATION DIVERSITY: A COMMUNICATION DISORDERS PERSPECTIVE4.5
DSST 310DISABILITY, CULTURE AND SOCIETY5
ECON 424ECONOMICS OF POVERTY AND DISCRIMINATION5
or AAST 424 ECONOMICS OF POVERTY AND DISCRIMINATION
or WMST 426 ECONOMICS OF POVERTY AND DISCRIMINATION
ECON 427ECONOMICS OF WOMEN AND WORK5
or WMST 427 ECONOMICS OF WOMEN AND WORK
EDUC 325INEQUALITIES AND IMPACTS ON EDUCATIONAL EQUITY4
ENGL 380SURVEY OF NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE5
or IDST 380 SURVEY OF NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENGL 389WOMEN, LITERATURE AND SOCIAL CHANGE5
or WMST 389 WOMEN, LITERATURE AND SOCIAL CHANGE
HIST 218CHICANO HISTORY5
or CHST 218 CHICANO HISTORY
HIST 313ASIAN AMERICAN HISTORY5
HIST 394WOMEN IN AMERICAN HISTORY5
or WMST 394 WOMEN IN AMERICAN HISTORY
HLED 366WOMEN'S HEALTH ISSUES4
or WMST 366 WOMEN'S HEALTH ISSUES
IDST 101INTRODUCTION TO INDIAN STUDIES5
IDST 321CONTEMPORARY INDIAN ISSUES5
PHIL 214PHILOSOPHICAL VOICES AND POP CULTURE5
PHIL 417WOMEN AND ETHICS5
or WMST 417 WOMEN AND ETHICS
PSYC 331PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN4
or WMST 331 PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN
PSYC 421CARE AND CUSTODY OF FEMALE OFFENDERS5
or WMST 421 CARE AND CUSTODY OF FEMALE OFFENDERS
RCST 101AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF RACE AND CULTURE5
RCST 202RACE, PRIVILEGE AND POWER5
SOCI 320RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS: GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES5
SOCI 321SEX AND GENDER5
or WMST 321 SEX AND GENDER
SPAN 312SPANISH FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS5
SPAN 313SPANISH COMPOSITION FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS5
WMST 101INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES5
or HUMN 101 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES
WMST 310ISSUES IN WOMEN'S STUDIES4
WMST 415GAY, LESBIAN, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER STUDIES5
or HUMN 415 GAY, LESBIAN, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER STUDIES

International Studies List

AAST 315AFRICAN HISTORY: ANCIENT AFRICA TO MANDELA5
or HIST 315 AFRICAN HISTORY: ANCIENT AFRICA TO MANDELA
or HONS 315 AFRICAN HISTORY: ANCIENT AFRICA TO MANDELA
ANTH 342TRIBES, BANDS AND CHIEFDOMS5
or HONS 342 TRIBES, BANDS AND CHIEFDOMS
ANTH 348PEASANT SOCIETIES5
ANTH 349MAJOR CIVLIZATIONS OF ASIA5
or HONS 349 MAJOR CIVILIZATIONS OF ASIA
ANTH 357PEOPLES OF LATIN AMERICA5
or HONS 357 PEOPLES OF LATIN AMERICA
ANTH 358MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY5
or HONS 358 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 366REVOLUTIONS AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE THIRD WORLD5
or HONS 366 REVOLUTIONS AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE THIRD WORLD
ANTH 450CULTURAL ECOLOGY5
or HONS 450 CULTURAL ECOLOGY
BIOL 320THE HUMAN PROSPECT5
or HUMN 320 THE HUMAN PROSPECT
CMST 440GLOBAL COMMUNICATION5
ECON 470INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS5
ECON 475ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT5
ENGL 323A GLOBAL VIEW THROUGH CHILDREN'S LITERATURE5
or EDUC 323 A GLOBAL VIEW THROUGH CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
GEOG 230WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY5
GEOL 380WORLD RESOURCES AND POPULATION5
GERM 381NATIONALISM AND RACISM IN CENTRAL EUROPEAN FILM4
or HUMN 381 NATIONALISM AND RACISM IN CENTRAL EUROPEAN FILM
GERM 38220TH CENTURY GERMANY, FROM WORLD WARS TO COLD WAR5
or HIST 382 20TH CENTURY GERMANY, FROM WORLD WARS TO COLD WAR
HIST 104EAST ASIA: TRADITION AND TRANSFORMATION5
HIST 301HISTORY OF THE PRESENT5
HIST 310IMPERIAL CHINA5
HIST 350WAR AND SOCIETY5
HIST 365LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY5
HIST 416MODERN JAPAN5
HIST 454DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF EUROPE, 1914 TO THE PRESENT5
HSAD 450INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON HEALTHCARE4
HUMN 315EAST-WEST PHILOSOPHIES AND RELIGIONS5
HUMN 440PERSPECTIVES ON DEATH5
IDST 477CONTEMPORARY INDIGENOUS WOMEN5
or WMST 477 CONTEMPORARY INDIGENOUS WOMEN
IDST 485INDIGENOUS EDUCATION5
or EDUC 485 INDIGENOUS EDUCATION
INST 200GLOBAL ISSUES4
INST 380JAPAN TODAY4
or JAPN 380 JAPAN TODAY
MGMT 470INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT4
or IBUS 470 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
MGMT 471MULTINATIONAL PEOPLE MANAGEMENT4
or IBUS 471 MULTINATIONAL PEOPLE MANAGEMENT
PLAN 476COMPARATIVE URBANIZATION4
POLI 203INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS5
POLI 204INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL POLITICS5
POLI 321INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS5
POLI 326EUROPEAN POLITICS5
POLI 329POLITICS OF SOUTH ASIA5
PSYC 474CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY5
SOCI 263SOCIAL PROBLEMS5
SOCI 486CONTEMPORARY WORLD SYSTEMS5
TECH 393TECHNOLOGY WORLD CIVILIZATION4
or HONS 393 TECHNOLOGY WORLD CIVILIZATION

Certificates

Undergraduate or Post-Baccalaureate Certificates

A certificate is a non-degree sequence, pattern or group of courses or a combination of instruction and independent study that focuses upon an area of specialized knowledge or information developed, administered and evaluated by the institution’s faculty members or by faculty-approved professionals. A certificate may include a capstone or practicum experience to facilitate the students’ ability to apply their knowledge in a variety of contexts.

A certificate can be matched with a major of less than 60 credits to fulfill the requirement for a minor. The purpose of a certificate is to complement a student’s degree program just as a minor does. The certificate generally focuses on an area of study that often has an applied or practical orientation and is usually interdisciplinary in nature, thereby distinguishing it from a minor.