Physical Education, Health and Recreation

This is an archived copy of the 2016-2017 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ewu.edu.

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Matthew Chase, Chair
department page
200 PEC Building
509.359.2341


Faculty

Garth Babcock, Christi Brewer, Matthew R. Chase, Christopher P. Cindric, Alan J. Coelho, John "Parry" Gerber, Jon J. Hammermeister, Chadron B. Hazelbaker, Jeremy Jostad, Carri Kreider, Nathaniel H. Lawton, Jeni R. McNeal, Emily S. Messina, Laureen V. Morley, Sarah Mount, Jacob S. Rehm, Jeremy Schultz, Katrina Taylor, Annika Vahk.


Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Bachelor of Arts in Education (BAE)

Bachelor of Science (BS)

Undergraduate Certificates

Undergraduate Minors


Undergraduate Programs

The Department of Physical Education, Health and Recreation (PEHR), houses the following major programs: Athletic Training, Community Health, Exercise Science, Health and Fitness (teaching endorsement), Outdoor Recreation, Recreation and Tourism Management and Therapeutic Recreation.

Professional Membership Requirements: every student graduating in PEHR must be a member of a professional organization at least by their senior year.

Advising and Consultation

Information for High School and Transfer Students: High school and transfer students should consult with specific program directors in the PEHR Department during their first quarter at EWU. At that time, a program can be formulated and any previous college classes evaluated for the major. As soon as students have decided to major or minor in programs offered by the department, they need to contact the PEHR Department and declare a major.

Degree Descriptions

Athletic Training: This major is designed for students who are interested in becoming certified athletic trainers. The major is designed to prepare students to sit for the Board of Certification’s national examination and to work competently in the field of Athletic Training and Sports Medicine. The major welcomes both the freshman and transfer student to apply and generally requires three years to complete. However, if specific prerequisites are met, the program can be completed within two-years. Students wishing to be admitted must apply and be accepted into the Athletic Training Education Program. Students in the program will receive formal instruction and clinical practice in development of proficiencies in risk management and injury prevention, pathology of injuries and illnesses, assessment and evaluation, acute care of injury and illness, pharmacology, therapeutic modalities, therapeutic psychosocial intervention and referral, health care administration and professional development and responsibilities. Opportunities for employment exist in but are not limited to, athletic training in high schools, colleges and professional and non-professional athletic teams, sports medicine clinics, hospitals, health clubs and corporate fitness programs. Opportunities also exist in colleges and universities for those who elect to continue beyond the bachelor’s degree.

Exercise Science: This major has three options and is designed for those students who are not interested in teaching but are interested in fitness and wellness management; or a graduate program in either physical therapy or occupational therapy. Graduates are prepared to work in various settings as managers of fitness programs. The options include corporate fitness, commercial fitness clubs, YMCA-YWCA or other non-commercial programs, retirement centers or hospital rehabilitation programs in cardiac rehabilitation, respiratory therapy and diabetes support. The program prepares students to pursue advanced degrees in professional programs in physical and occupational therapy, or chiropractic, as well as degrees in exercise physiology, biomechanics, motor control and learning, cardiac rehabilitation, and adult fitness. The program and coursework prepares students to pursue certification from organizations such as including ACSM, NSCA, NASM, and ACE. These certifications are widely accepted in the fitness industry.

Health and Fitness: The Health and Fitness (BAE) degree is designed for those students pursuing a teaching endorsement. Students will become certified to teach K–12 within both the health and fitness (physical education) areas. We also continue to offer a non-teaching physical education coaching minor.

Recreation: The nationally accredited Recreation program focus on a profession that offers many challenging and varied forms of employment. Trained recreation leaders are regularly hired in positions with cities, communities, youth agencies, parks, resorts, outfitting companies, convention centers, rehabilitation medicine, correction facilities, the armed forces and much more.

The recreation curriculum is designed to aid students in developing a philosophical and practical knowledge of recreation and leisure services. Students are exposed to skill-sets and competencies that are relevant to a career in recreation, which prepares them for a ten to sixteen week professional internship.

Students may choose from a comprehensive curriculum in one of three majors: Outdoor Recreation, Recreation and Tourism Management, Therapeutic Recreation and minors in Aquatics, Challenge Course Management and Leadership and a certificate in Challenge Course Management and Leadership.

Public Health: Public Health majors are professionals who design, conduct and evaluate activities that help improve the health of all people. Placements will be in a variety of settings including public health and non-profit health agencies, worksite wellness programs, colleges and universities and government agencies. The majors are prepared to sit for the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing (CHES) examination and for graduate programs in public health and health promotion.

Special Programs Information

Human Performance Laboratory: The Human Performance Laboratory located in the Physical Education Classroom Building provides state-of-the-art equipment for clinical and research experience in the areas of athletic training, exercise physiology, motor learning, biomechanics, and health promotion conducted by faculty, graduate and undergraduate students. The lab is made available for clinical evaluations and exercise prescriptions for faculty, staff, students and the community.

Fitness Center: The University Recreation Center (URC) Fitness Center is designed to meet the health, wellness and fitness needs of the EWU campus community. The URC Fitness Center has 15,000 square feet of fitness space with a variety of fitness options available. Activity options include: strength training (3 circuits, free weights, racks, and platforms), cardio equipment (treadmills, elliptical trainers, arc trainers, steppers, bikes, ascent trainers, stepmills; most with a view of a TV), and functional equipment (functional trainers, stability balls, TRX, medicine balls, BOSU). Also included are a multi-purpose gym (for basketball, volleyball, etc) and an indoor running track (1/9 mile). Fitness Instructors are always available to assist members during their workouts. To motivate and assist members in achieving their fitness goals personal training is available (for an additional fee). Each quarter the PEHR Department offers both PHED 150 Fast Fitness (2) and PHED 152 Strength/Weight Training (2) as a credit option for EWU students using the facility.

Degree Requirements for all Recreation Majors

  • two years of a single high school foreign language or one year of a single college level foreign language is required;
  • a minimum grade ≥2.50 must be obtained in each required RCLS course (if a lower grade is received, the course must be retaken);
  • a minimum cumulative GPA ≥2.50 shall be necessary in all upper- and lower-division required RCLS courses;
  • a minimum cumulative GPA ≥2.50 shall be required for all university coursework; failure to comply with the above standards will jeopardize professional internship eligibility.
  • must see your advisor at least once per quarter.
  • current First Aid/CPR card is required for all majors;
  • computer competency is required.

Internship Requirement

Prior to interning, students must complete three major requirements
  • each student must complete 1500 hours of practical experience in the recreation and leisure service field, prior to qualifying for the professional internship. These 1500 hours must be from three (3) separate sources with no more than 750 hours from any one source. (Therapeutic Recreation majors have specific requirements to fulfill, as regards to the number of hours and various populations; these majors must consult with their advisor.);
  • applications for the Professional Internship must be presented to their faculty advisor no later than May 15. (Students may register for their internship, only during the summer quarter.);
  • each student must obtain a current Standard First Aid Card or Advanced First-Aid Card.

Required courses in the following programs of study may have prerequisites. Reference the course description section for clarification.

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Graduate Degrees

Master of Science (MS)


Graduate Program

Admission Requirements

The Master of Science degree in Physical Education prepares students for a diverse array of careers in areas including athletic administration, teaching and coaching, directing fitness facilities and programs in a variety of settings, and sport psychology consultation with athletic teams. Additionally, the degree is applicable to those students interested in pursuing advanced graduate studies in related areas. This program provides an opportunity for students to focus on one of two areas of specialization: Sports and Recreation Administration or Exercise Science. All students are required to take a basic core of courses and then select a specialization area. A thesis is required of Exercise Science  students. The Sports and Recreation Administration specialization has the option of a thesis, research report or written examination to complete the degree. Prospective students should hold a related baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. Applicants for admission to the graduate program in physical education must follow the graduate admission procedures as outlined elsewhere in this catalog. In addition, applicants must submit three professional letters of recommendation and a one to two page essay describing their professional goals and objectives. Students are admitted for fall quarter only; requests for admission in other academic quarters are discouraged.

Final Comprehensive Examination Options

Before the awarding of the master’s degree, each student will successfully complete one of two options: a thesis or other research project; or a written examination.

Option A: The thesis or research project will be selected in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor. Each student shall complete an oral examination, which will focus  primarily on the master’s thesis or project but which may also include questions to demonstrate competence in all areas included in the program of that student. Students will provide copies of their master’s thesis or project to the oral examination committee at least two weeks in advance of the scheduled oral examination.

Option B: The written examination is designed to test students’ competence across the breadth of their program. Over the course of the 4 hours, the student will address  questions on research methods and statistics as well theory and content. The student will approach prospective committee members to ensure they are willing to provide examination questions. The examination committee will consist of three graduate faculty members: two from the Physical Education, Health and Recreation Department, one of whom will chair the committee; and a faculty member designated by the Graduate Office. If the student does not pass in their first attempt, the student may be required to take additional courses and will be permitted to take the written examination one additional time. For option A, the final oral examination will be open to interested faculty and students and may be open to questions from non-committee members at the discretion of the committee. The final oral examination for option A will be no longer than 2 hours. With respect to option B, the examination will not be held over vacation periods or during summer quarter except by advance approval of all committee members.

Subjects codes: Athletic Training (ATTR) , Exercise Science (EXSC) , Health Education (HLED) , Physical Education (PHED) , Recreation and Leisure Services (RCLS)


Athletic Training Courses


ATTR 201. INTRODUCTION TO ATHLETIC TRAINING. 3 Credits.

Introduction to athletic training is a basic course designed to introduce the profession of athletic training to students who are interested in pursuing athletic training as a professional career choice. Students will be introduced to the following areas that encompass the athletic training field: athletic training as an allied health profession, current educational requirements for national practice, emergency planning and procedures, and environmental concerns. Hands-on experiences may include common wrapping, taping and bracing techniques.

ATTR 288. CLINICAL ATHLETIC TRAINING I. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: must be a declared Athletic Training major.
The course is designed to provide clinical experience in a professional athletic training setting. The student works as an assistant under the direction of a certified athletic trainer/clinical instructor. A portfolio completed by the student and checked off by the clinical instructor is used to document completion of competencies. This course should be taken three times during an academic career.

ATTR 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

ATTR 339. ATHLETIC TRAINING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ATTR 201.
The purpose of the Basic Athletic Training Course is to provide participants with the fundamental aspects of Athletic Training including prevention, recognition, management and treatment of various musculoskeletal injuries. The lab portion of the class will address basic wrapping and taping techniques, as well as hands-on injury evaluation.

ATTR 340. THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES IN SPORTS MEDICINE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ATTR 339 or permission of course instructor.
The course covers techniques in therapeutic exercise, thermal therapy, hydrotherapy, cryrotherapy and electrical modalities. It also introduces students to psychological and physiological responses to injury.

ATTR 341. REHABILITATION IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ATTR 340 or permission of course instructor.
Design and supervision of rehabilitation programs for orthopedic athletic injuries. This will include common programs for major joint and musculoskeletal injuries; also will consist of learning techniques in therapeutic exercise, massage, joint mobilization, and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation.

ATTR 350. MEDICATIONS IN THE HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONS. 2 Credits.

This course covers usage of therapeutic medications for allied health care professionals. It explores the common medications used in the rehabilitative health professions. It also addresses the mechanisms of drug action in relation to the treatment of diseases, dosage requirements, drug interactions, side effects, legal considerations and general information and guidelines related to medication usage.

ATTR 360. GENERAL MEDICAL CONDITIONS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ATTR 341 or permission of the instructor.
This course will provide students an opportunity to learn about general medical conditions of the body system. Subjects covered will include mechanism of acquisition, signs, symptoms, referral, treatment and return to participation criteria. Students will develop a framework for decision making when evaluating individuals including athletes that present with these conditions.

ATTR 370. CONTEMPORARY HEALTH ISSUES IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ATTR 201 or permission of instructor.
This course provides an understanding of the personal and societal health issues they will encounter as a part of the profession of athletic training.

ATTR 388. CLINICAL ATHLETIC TRAINING II. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: ATTR 288 or equivalent.
A course designed to provide a minimum of 1000 hours of clinical experience in a professional athletic training setting over a minimum of at least two years. The students work in an assistant capacity under the direction of a certified athletic trainer/clinical instructor. A portfolio, completed by the students and checked off by the clinical instructor is used to document completion of competencies.

ATTR 428. ORTHOPEDIC EVALUATION I. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ATTR 341 or permission of course instructor.
This course will provide students an opportunity to learn and practice injury evaluation procedures used in athletic training. The course will address history taking, inspection, palpation and orthopedic evaluation, as basic principles used in injury evaluation. Laboratory time will be devoted to palpation, structural assessment, neurologic assessment, range of motion and strength assessment of the pelvis, hip, thigh, lower leg, ankle and foot.

ATTR 429. ORTHOPEDIC EVALUATION II. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ATTR 428 or permission of course instructor.
This course will provide students an opportunity to learn and practice injury evaluation procedures used in athletic training. The course will address history taking, inspection, palpation and orthopedic evaluation, as basic principles used in injury evaluation. Laboratory time will be devoted to palpation, structural assessment, neurologic assessment and strength assessment in injuries involving the spine, shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand.

ATTR 439. CURRENT TOPICS IN SPORTS MEDICINE. 1 Credit.

This course incorporates current topics that are not generally taught in the athletic training curriculum. It emphasizes student participation through a group presentation. The course is to be taken at least three times for the major.

ATTR 450. ADVANCED PROCDURES AND TECHNIQUES IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ATTR 428 and ATTR 429.
This course introduces students to those skills and techniques used in the practice of athletic training that are beyond those typically considered basic in the profession, in that the procedures discussed and the practical skills attained are more time intensive and require pre-requisite foundational skills.

ATTR 488. CLINICAL ATHLETIC TRAINING III. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ATTR 388 or permission of instructor.
This course should be taken three times during an academic career. A course designed to provide a minimum of 1000 hours of clinical experience in a professional athletic training setting over a minimum of at least two years. The students work in an assistant capacity under the direction of a certified athletic trainer/clinical instructor. A portfolio, completed by the students and checked off by the clinical instructor is used to document completion of competencies.

ATTR 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
The course is designed as the capstone for athletic training majors. It will focus on the administrative and management responsibilities required when working in the field of sports medicine including job requirements and problems faced as a professional. There will be group and individual projects and presentations related to sports medicine and athletic training, including a culminating project that will be assessed by class peers and professionals in the related field. The final project will require students to work in groups to design an athletic training facility, addressing facility and equipment selection and organization, personnel selection and management, legal liability, insurance and budgeting.

ATTR 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

ATTR 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.


Exercise Science Courses


EXSC 301. INTRODUCTION TO EXERCISE SCIENCE. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: must be declared exercise science major.
This course covers the basic skills necessary for success in the Exercise Science Program and prepares students for a career or graduate school. Students are exposed to professionals from multiple career fields related to Exercise Science.Presentations include the development of a resume and cover letter, how to use the library effectively and various professional development tools. The goal of this course is to help you gain a clear understanding of your career aspirations and to help direct your studies towards those goals.

EXSC 388. EXERCISE SCIENCE PRACTICUM. 1-8 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor.
This course is designed to assist Pre-Physical Therapy (PT) and Pre-Occupational Therapy (OT) students prepare for their application to graduate school. The Pre-PT and Pre-OT Exercise Science majors are required to observe and/or work under a licensed PT or OT in different settings. They will spend a minimum of 50 hours at any one location and can observe in 2-4 different locations. The experience will be documented through record of hours, and a reflection of the experience as a potential career location as a PT or OT professional at the completion of the hours.

EXSC 395. INTERNSHIP. 1-8 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor.

EXSC 455. RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CSBS 320.
This course is designed to teach the students to critically analyze the literature in the field. In addition, they will be exposed to the criteria for good research and to evaluate how well articles in the field follow that criteria.

EXSC 460. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHED 349, PHED 350 and PHED 352 or permission of the instructor.
The application of physiological principles to exercise. Special attention is given to energy sources, work, power, pulmonary system, cardiorespiratory neural control systems, sex differences, hypo- and hyperbaric pressure, heat balance, body composition, and the endocrine system in exercise.

EXSC 480. CLINICAL EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHED 350 or permission of the instructor.
This course presents a detailed understanding of the latest advances in the emerging field of clinical exercise physiology. The focus is on diseases, where exercise can impact onset, treatment or outcomes, i.e., diseases of the cardiovascular, endocrine and musculoskeletal systems.

EXSC 481. ELECTROCARDIOLOGY INTERPRET. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: BIOL 232, BIOL 233.
This course teaches the interpretation of electrocardiograms (ECGs). It will cover normal and pathological changes both at rest and during exercise.

EXSC 488. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. 5-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor.
This course is designed to assist Exercise Science students prepare for a job in their chosen field. The internship experience is hands-on under the supervision of a professional, monitored by the faculty advisor. Students will have completed the majority of their course work to prepare for the experience. The requirement is 400 hours and may be divided into up to three locations. The experience will be documented through record of hours and regular reflections of the experience as a potential career location, as well as evaluations by the site supervisor.

EXSC 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE IN EXERCISE SCIENCE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing and EXSC 460.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
This course is designated as a departmental capstone for Exercise Science majors. They will study the process of assessment and prescription of apparently healthy adults. There will be end-of-program assessment, both written and practical. Students will also study a current issue in the field through research, group projects and written and oral presentations. The course is designed to help students prepare for the ACSM’s Certified Health Fitness Specialist, the benchmark exam in the field.

EXSC 495. INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

EXSC 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-15 Credits.

EXSC 499. DIR STUDY. 1-15 Credits.


Health Education Courses


HLED 115. WELLNESS FOR LIFE. 3 Credits.

Offers an overview of basic concepts of personal wellness from a holistic perspective. Explores behavior change, nutrition, physical activity, stress management, healthy relationships, environmental health, spiritual health, sexuality, drugs and alcohol, and intellectual health. Students assess their own wellness and develop strategies for behavioral change.

HLED 192. SPORTS SAFETY TRAINING. 3 Credits.

The purpose of the American Red Cross Sports Safety Training course is to provide participants with the necessary skills and knowledge to help provide a safe environment for participation, recognize and treat emergency situations, and understand how to apply preventative measures for health and safety of sports participants.

HLED 193. STANDARD FIRST AID AND SAFETY. 2 Credits.

The American Red Cross CPR/AED for Professional Rescuers and Health Care Providers program is to train professional-level rescuers to respond to breathing and cardiac emergencies in adults, children and infants until more advanced medical personnel take over. Students will earn the American Red Cross CPR/AED for Professional Rescuers and Health Care Providers certification good for two years from the course date.

HLED 194. EMERGENCY RESPONSE. 3 Credits.

The course provides the participant with the knowledge and skills necessary to work as a first responder. In an emergency, first responders help sustain life, reduce pain, and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness until more advanced medical practitioners can arrive. The course content and activities will prepare participants to make appropriate decisions about the care to provide in an emergency. The course teaches the skills a first responder needs to act as a crucial link in the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system.

HLED 197. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

HLED 200. ADMISSION TO HEALTH AND FITNESS. 2 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce potential majors to the Health and Fitness profession as well as describe the major's expectations and requirements for being admitted into the program and becoming certified as a K-12 Health and Fitness instructor.

HLED 201. INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH AND WELLNESS. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to be an introduction to health and wellness. Foundations are laid in nutrition, physical activity and fitness, stress management, substance abuse, disease and injury prevention, sexually transmitted diseases, and environmental health issues, among others. In addition, skills are taught to enhance the student's ability to make health behavior changes.

HLED 250. DRUGS, SOCIETY AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR. 3 Credits.

This course consist of a study of human behavior in the context of drug use, abuse, and addiction. There will be discussions on the physiology of drug consumption, as well as the physical, emotional, psychological, and social affects of various groups of drugs (depressants, stimulants, opiates, hallucinogenics, and narcotics). Prescription drugs, over the counter drugs, steriods, and other supplements will also be discussed.

HLED 256. MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY. 2 Credits.

This course examines the nature and function of the medical language, and the building of medical words from word roots, prefixes, suffixes, and combining forms. This course will prepare students who are entering into medical-related fields of interest.

HLED 293. CPR/AED REFRESHER COURSE. 1 Credit.

The American Red Cross CPR/AED for Professional Rescuers and Health Care Providers program is to train professional-level rescuers to respond to breathing and cardiac emergencies in adults, children and infants until more advanced medical personnel take over. Students will earn the American Red Cross CPR/AED for Professional Rescuers and Health Care Providers certification good for two years from the course date.

HLED 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-10 Credits.

HLED 299. SPECIAL STUDIES. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Special studies in health education or community health. Selected topics vary according to student and faculty interest.

HLED 300. AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAMMING. 3 Credits.

Notes: taught spring quarter.
Pre-requisites: PHED 337 and PHED 375 with a grade ≥2.8 or permission of instructor.
This course engages students in how to successfully implement as well as physically be responsible for facilitating an After-School Garden-Based & Outdoor Educational program in collaboration with a local community member.

HLED 365. TEACHING METHODS IN HEALTH. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHED 365 and PHED 375.
This course covers methods and procedures of teaching health in elementary, junior and senior high schools. It provides an opportunity for practice teaching and development of teaching units for the classroom.

HLED 366. WOMEN'S HEALTH ISSUES. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: WMST 366.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
This course will explore the unique personal and social concerns regarding women’s health. Emphasis will be placed on the social and health related issues that women face throughout the life cycle. Discussion will include the effect of gender stratification in the workforce, gender roles in the family unit, female depiction in the media, substance abuse, body image, pregnancy and sexuality and other issues that affect women’s mental, physical and emotional health. Historical dimensions of women’s health will also be explored, including contributions from historically noteworthy women.

HLED 370. PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: declared Major in Health and Fitness or Public Health.
This course provides an overview and introduction to basic concepts of personal and community health problems, including mental health, nutrition and weight control, diseases, physical fitness, aging, death and dying, sex and reproduction. It also considers health fundamentals important in making health-related decisions.

HLED 372. APPLIED NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL FITNESS. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the field of applied nutrition. The course content brings together information from a variety of fields - biochemistry, exercise physiology, nutrition, medicine and physiology. The students apply that knowledge to understand how what we eat affects not only sport performance but also personal health.

HLED 374. INTRODUCTION TO EPIDEMIOLOGY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HLED 370 or permission of instructor.
This course examines the major communicable diseases of humans with emphasis upon prevention and control, and it provides an introduction to the modern scientific approach to control of communicable diseases and biostatistics.

HLED 375. GERONTOLOGY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HLED 201 or permission of the instructor.
This course examines anatomical, physiological, pathological, medical, psychological and sociological factors that impact individuals moving through the aging process. The topics discussed will include the major problems of degenerative and chronic diseases, and an analysis of the physical and physiological deterioration of the body and mind.

HLED 376. CONSUMER HEALTH. 3 Credits.

Consumer health has much to do with the way we live. It deals with the selection of the products and services available in the marketplace that have an impact on health. Discussion includes: advertising, methods of distribution, techniques of selling, and methods of making positive decisions about health products and services.

HLED 380. HEALTH BEHAVIOR CHANGE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HLED 370 and HLED 382 or permission of instructor.
This course will provide students with the theoretical tools to analyze health-related behaviors and the social, cultural and environmental context in which they occur. An ecological/systems approach will provide the foundation for learning and applying a variety of health behavior theories.

HLED 381. MIND-BODY HEALTH. 3 Credits.

Notes: taught spring quarter.
Pre-requisites: HLED 370 or permission of instructor.
The mind-body interaction has important implications for the way we view health and the practice of health promotion. This course will explore how thoughts and emotions impact health. Stress will be considered through personal inventory and reflection as well a biological examination of the impact of stress on physical health. Positive psychology and topics related to happiness and resiliency will be explored. Students will have the opportunity to practice common mind-body techniques such as progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, and cognitive behavioral therapy. This course provides knowledge and skills for health professionals to study and apply theories of mind-body medicine and health.

HLED 382. HEALTH DISPARITIES. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: declared Public Health Major or permission of instructor.
This course will examine the cultural, socioeconomic, and political factors that contribute to health disparities on a local, national, and global level. Health disparities represent the most important challenge in public health. Social conditions such as poverty, social isolation, segregation, gender and race are associated with chronic diseases and causes of premature death. This course will adopt a systems lens to identify relationships and leverage points to help reduce disparities and improve health across all borders.

HLED 383. ENVIRONMENTS FOR HEALTH. 4 Credits.

Notes: taught spring quarter.
Pre-requisites: HLED 380 or permission of instructor.
This course will examine how the built & natural environment influences health behavior. Students will examine urban design features that impact physical activity such as parks, sidewalks, trails, public transit and connectivity. A key element of this course is a service learning project that allows students to apply their learning by analyzing walkability in their community. Students will also explore the concept of biophilia and how time spent in nature can buffer the effects of certain health conditions such as stress, ADHD and autism.

HLED 395. CO-OP FIELDWORK. 1-15 Credits.

HLED 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

HLED 397. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

HLED 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

HLED 411. EMERGENCY RESPONSE INSTRUCTOR. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing and HLED 194.
Teaching methods and procedures in skills as prescribed by the American Red Cross (ARC) Emergency Response Course. Those who qualify may earn the American Red Cross Emergency Response Instructor Certificate valid for 3 years, and the American Red Cross CPR for the professional rescuer certificate valid for 1 year.

HLED 412. EMERGENCY RESPONSE INSSTRUCTOR'S LABORATORY PRACTICUM. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HLED 194, HLED 411.
The most current First Aid teaching and skill techniques required by the American Red Cross will be implemented in a laboratory situation. The student will teach an undergraduate level First Aid laboratory class as a student instructor. This instruction will be under supervision of a certified master teacher. Upon successful completion of all requirements the Emergency Response Instructor Certificate will be renewed for one more year.

HLED 440. HEALTH PROMOTION PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HLED 380 or permission of instructor.
In this course students learn how to develop a detailed and evidence-based health promotion program using planning models. Emphasis is placed on developing and understanding: needs assessments, program rationale, mission statements, and goals and objectives. Students also explore theories and models commonly used in health promotion programs and apply these principles in a service-learning project.

HLED 450. HEALTH PROMOTION PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HLED 440.
In this course students learn how to implement and evaluate effective health promotion programs. Emphasis is placed on implementation strategies, advocacy plans, targeted marketing strategies, program budgets and evaluation plans. Students explore effective health communication strategies and ethical guidelines established by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing.

HLED 475. SEX EDUCATION IN SCHOOLS AND COMMUNITY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HLED 370 or permission of instructor.
Methods and procedures utilized in the teaching of human sexuality in schools and community health agencies. Opportunity for practice teaching and development of teaching units.

HLED 482. GRANT WRITING IN PUBLIC HEALTH. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HLED 440 and concurrent enrollment in HLED 488 or permission of instructor.
This class will teach students the skills necessary to write grants in the health field. It is an applied class where the students are expected to go through the grant writing process. The skills developed will prepare the students to search and apply for funding from a variety of sources.

HLED 483. ADOLESCENT HEALTH ISSUES. 3 Credits.

Enables parents, teachers and professional staff to identify factors that cause adolescent health problems. Focuses on identifying risk factors and steps to improve adolescent health.

HLED 484. FACTS ABOUT HIV/AIDS. 3 Credits.

Provides basic information about HIV/AIDS, covering areas of concern for lay individuals and working professionals. Students will gain knowledge about transmission and treatment of HIV/AIDS and related issues such as its relationship to children, CPR, first aid, aquatics and impact on society.

HLED 485. MANAGING STRESS. 3 Credits.

Provides valuable information on how stress affects health and teaches students how to manage stress effectively.

HLED 486. PREVENT DISEASE TRANSMISSION. 3 Credits.

Provides basic information about types of infectious diseases with focus on the transmission and prevention of blood-borne pathogens. Students will learn about OSHA regulations and how to protect themselves in the workplace.

HLED 487. TIME MANAGEMENT. 3 Credits.

Provides valuable time management skills for real life applications. Students select from time management options to analyze, strategize, and attack their individual time management concerns.

HLED 488. SERVICE LEARNING IN PUBLIC HEALTH. 12 Credits.

Notes: must obtain prior approval of the Public Health Program Director.
Pre-requisites: concurrent enrollment in HLED 482.
Practical experience designed primarily for public health education majors; however, all students are welcome, and become members of a health-serving agency performing professional tasks along with the full-time staff of the agency.

HLED 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE IN PUBLIC HEALTH. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HLED 450 or permission of instructor.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
This course is designated as the capstone course for those students majoring in Public Health within the Department of Physical Education, Health and Recreation. An end-of-program assessment will be completed. The course will focus on the major issues, requirements and problems facing health professionals as they enter the field. Using group problem solving techniques, lecture and a final project developed to encompass past knowledge and skills, the students will present a course plan complete with all necessary components to function. A major focus will be for the students to develop their understanding of the group process as it relates to being a member of the team as well as the ability to effectively assess populations and create and implement a curriculum specific to a population. This course is based on the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) competencies.

HLED 495. INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

HLED 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

Provides the opportunity to experience limited on-the-job training within health agencies.

HLED 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Workshops dealing with specific aspects of health education, conducted either during the summer or by extension. These workshops are designed for experienced teachers with interests in health education.

HLED 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Seminars dealing with various aspects of health and health education; designed for advanced students in para-medical sciences and/or experienced teachers.

HLED 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

HLED 505. SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL TRENDS IN PUBLIC HEALTH. 4 Credits.

This course focuses on current trends and issues in public health in the United States. Emphasis is placed on how social determinants (individual behaviors, physical environment, and economic environment) are linked to current health outcomes. The course also examines: current initiatives, disease control practices, health disparities, and national health improvement priorities.

HLED 552. CULTURE, PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE AND ELIMINATING HEALTH DISPARITIES. 4 Credits.

This course focuses on the examination of the cultural factors that influence health outcomes. Emphasis will be placed on using targeted interventions in public health to address specific health concerns. The course will also provide a opportunity to critically examine current public health interventions for their efficacy in improving health outcomes.


Physical Education Courses


PHED 120. PE ACTIVITIES. 1 Credit.

Notes: designed primarily for women.
Women’s conditioning classes for varsity sports, volleyball, tennis, basketball, soccer, track, etc.

PHED 125. PE ACTIVITIES. 1 Credit.

Notes: co-educational.
Aerobics, archery, aquacise, aquatic fitness, badminton, basketball, better back program, bicycling, corrective lab, country swing dance, frisbee, fun and fitness, golf, gymnastics, jogging, karate, military conditioning, personal defense, pickleball, progressive weight training, racquetball, running, self-defense, skiing, soccer, softball, social dance, swimming, tennis, trap shooting, triathlon training, volleyball, and walking. Corrective laboratory is offered for those unable to participate in regular activities because of disability.

PHED 130. PE ACTIVITIES. 1 Credit.

Notes: designed primarily for men.
Men’s conditioning classes for varsity sports: baseball, basketball, cross country, football, tennis and track.

PHED 132. KINESIOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS OF HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 4 Credits.

Offered: Fall This course will provide students with an understanding of the physiological and anatomical basis of human movement. Students will be presented with examples from sports, physical activity, recreation and rehabilitation to enhance their understanding of anatomical structures, their origin, insertion and function.

PHED 135. SPECIALIZED FITNESS ACTIVITIES. 2 Credits.

Includes a group of fitness-based activity classes designed to promote muscular strength and endurance, cardiovascular endurance and flexibility. Programs are developed to meet individual participants' interests and fitness levels, and activities are conducted at a variety of locations.

PHED 150. FAST FITNESS. 2 Credits.

Comprehensive physical fitness course designed to develop strength, flexibility, and endurance (muscular and cardiovascular) in an effective and efficient manner through use of the EWU Fitness Center. Mandatory orientation and evaluation (pre-testing and post-testing) accompanies the program. Designed to develop baseline fitness levels for all persons with varying fitness levels. Lab.

PHED 151. GROUP EXERCISE. 2 Credits.

Group Exercise involves fitness activities done with music using cardiovascular exercise, muscular strength endurance, and flexibility exercises are used to develop the health related components of physical fitness. Clases may include step training, aerobic kickboxing, yoga for fitness, stability ball training, and muscle pump classes. Emphasis will be placed on improving fitness, having fun, and learning about healthy living.

PHED 152. STRENGTH/WEIGHT TRAINING. 2 Credits.

Strength/weight training provides students an opportunity to develop musculoskeleta fitness based on the scientific principles of resistance training. Assistance will be given to students in developing a program design to meet their fitness goals.

PHED 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

PHED 197. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 2 Credits.

PHED 199. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

PHED 251. MOTOR CONTROL AND LEARNING. 4 Credits.

This course introduces students to the processes that underlie human movement through bridging the gap between research and practice. It provides the necessary tools to build a solid foundation for assessing performance, providing effective instruction, designing practices and training experiences to optimize skill acquisition and performance.

PHED 259. SPORTS FIRST AID AND INJURY PREVENTION. 3 Credits.

This course is designed for those seeking to become coaches in high school, college and university, Olympic and competitive club-sport programs for athletes 14 years of age and older. The primary objective of this course is to introduce the coach to the importance of safety and injury prevention in sport settings.

PHED 260. SPORT SCIENCES FOR COACHING. 3 Credits.

Notes: Leader Level.
Men’s conditioning classes for varsity sports: baseball, basketball, cross country, football, tennis and track. A professional preparation course for coaches designed to acquaint students with basic scientific information needed in coaching.

PHED 261. COACHING SPORTS TECHNICAL AND TACTICAL SKILLS. 3 Credits.

The course is designed for those seeking to become coaches in high school, college and university, Olympic, and competitive club-sport programs for athletes 14 years of age and older. Students will gain a solid understanding of sport-specific technical and tactical skills in order to teach these skills effectively. They will also gain valuable insight on developing practice and season plans and coaching on game day.

PHED 265. INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE LIFE. 3 Credits.

Notes: only offered fall quarter.
This course is designed to assist EWU freshman and transfer student-athletes in transitioning to Eastern Washington University and to Eagle athletics, developing and improving essential academic, personal health and wellness, and social skills, making connections with the campus and local community as well as becoming oriented with campus resources and facilities and exploring career and academic goals.

PHED 278. COACHING VOLLEYBALL. 3 Credits.

Coaching techniques and strategies in volleyball.

PHED 281. COACHING FOOTBALL. 3 Credits.

Coaching techniques and strategies in football.

PHED 282. COACHING BASKETBALL. 3 Credits.

Coaching techniques and strategies in basketball.

PHED 283. COACHING TRACK. 3 Credits.

Coaching techniques and strategies in track.

PHED 285. COACHING BASEBALL/SOFTBALL. 3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to coaching techniques and strategies in baseball and softball.

PHED 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor and the department chair.
Special studies in physical education. Selected topics vary according to student and faculty interest.

PHED 299. INDIVIDUAL STUDIES. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Study of selected problems in physical education.

PHED 301. PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT IN SPORT AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to be a practical, hands-on approach to a broad range of interventions aimed at improving performance in sport and physical activity settings. The focus of the course is on key mental tools (e.g., imagery, goal-setting, relaxation techniques, self-talk) and how they can be applied to facilitate enhancement of the key mental skills such as self-confidence, concentration, controlling emotions and staying optimally motivated. The course material is designed to help all students who are interested in maximizing performance in sport or physical activity.

PHED 333. GROUP EXERCISE INSTRUCTOR TRAINING. 2 Credits.

Notes: taught fall, winter, spring.
This course educates potential group exercise instructors. The content includes practical experience in group fitness activities. Upon completion of this course, students will be better prepared to take the ACE national group fitness exam and design a safe and effective class.

PHED 334. PERSONAL TRAINING. 3 Credits.

Personal Training is a comprehensive course designed to prepare students to become certified Personal Trainers.

PHED 335. STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING PROLAB. 2 Credits.

A professional laboratory course is designed to provide the knowledge and practical experiences necessary for becoming a certified strength and conditioning professional. The focus of the course is on athletic populations.

PHED 336. INDIVIDUAL SPORTS. 2 Credits.

Notes: taught all quarters.
Pre-requisites: PHED 337 and PHED 375 with a grade ≥2.8 or permission of instructor.
This course is a physical education course designed to develop skills and progressive methods in teaching individual sports for effective K-12 instruction.

PHED 337. TEAM SPORTS. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHED 341 and PHED 365 with a grade ≥2.8, concurrent enrollment in PHED 375 and successful completion of the West B.
This is a physical education course designed to develop skills and progressive methods in teaching team sports for effective K-12 instruction.

PHED 340. RHYTHMS AND GAMES. 2 Credits.

Notes: taught spring quarter.
Pre-requisites: PHED 337 and PHED 375 with a grade ≥2.8 or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to develop skills and progressive methods in teaching games using rhythm for effective K-12 instruction. Activities could include dance, movement experiences and games that help develop motor skills.

PHED 341. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ACTIVITIES. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HLED 200 with a grade ≥2.8 and concurrent enrollment in PHED 365 or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to develop skills and progressive methods in teaching a wide range of activities appropriate for elementary physical education classes.

PHED 342. LIFELONG LEISURE ACTIVITIES. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHED 337 and PHED 375 with a grade ≥2.8 or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to develop skills and progressive methods in teaching lifelong leisure activities for effective K-12 instruction. Activities such as road and mountain bicycling, rock climbing, hiking-camping, canoeing, golf, cross-country skiing, orienteering and adventure ropes may be included.

PHED 343. WELLNESS AND FITNESS. 2 Credits.

A physical education course designed to develop skills and progressive methods in teaching wellness and fitness for effective K-12 instruction.

PHED 348. ANATOMICAL/MECHAB KINESIOLOGY. 4 Credits.

A study of the structural components of human movement, as well as the study of the laws of physics as they affect human movement. Special attention is given to the analysis of movement.

PHED 349. ANATOMICAL KINESIOLOGY. 4 Credits.

A study of the structural components of human movement. Special attention is given to the analysis of movement.

PHED 350. PHYSIOLOGICAL KINESIOLOGY. 4 Credits.

A study of the functional components of human movements, especially the variables of flexibility, strength and endurance, the cardiovascular system and ergogenic aids.

PHED 352. MECHANICAL KINESIOLOGY. 4 Credits.

This course is concerned with the mechanical principles applied to athletic movements. The information will provide a biomechanical basis for teaching and coaching physical activities. Sports skills will be analyzed and the underlying mechanical principles governing these movements will be identified. A significant amount of mathematical and quantitative calculations will be performed in this course. A final project is required.

PHED 360. ADVANCED PERSONAL TRAINING. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHED 334 and MKTG 310 or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to combine the business and marketing aspects of personal training with the applied components of program design, progression and client retention and acquisition.

PHED 365. GENERAL METHODS AND PROCEDURES FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HLED 200 with a grade ≥2.8 and concurrent enrollment in PHED 341 or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to introduce Health and Fitness majors to the general methods and procedures related to conducting physical education classes in elementary and secondary schools.

PHED 366. INTRODUCTION TO SERVICE, CITIZENSHIP AND COMMUNITY. 3 Credits.

Notes: offered spring quarter only.
Pre-requisites: PHED 265 or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to build upon the activities completed in “Introduction to College Life” that make a successful college career while also thinking more deeply about career choices. Furthermore, this course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to engage in a 15-hour service-learning component working with a population or in a program of interest career wise (i.e., coaching, education, public relations, etc.) that will assist them in examining their strengths through the lens on the project.

PHED 367. ENGAGED LEADERSHIP. 3 Credits.

Notes: this class will only be taught summer quarter.
Pre-requisites: PHED 366 or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to assist students in developing their leadership skills. Students build upon the work they performed at their previous service-learning placement by creating a sustainable, capacity building legacy project with the organization. They develop skills for becoming leaders in their fields of study and in their communities.

PHED 370. SPORT AND CULTURE. 4 Credits.

WINTER This course is the study of the interrelationships between sport and culture, including religion, politics, economics, race, arts and science.

PHED 375. ASSESSMENT IN HEALTH AND FITNESS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHED 341 and PHED 365 with a grade ≥2.8, concurrent enrollment in PHED 337 and successful completion of the West B.
This course covers the knowledge of commonly used health and fitness assessments in order to analyze K-12 student learning and development, as well as teaching effectiveness.

PHED 390. HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing and a minimum GPA ≥2.0.
Analysis of educationally sound programs and of procedures and practices in the development of basic health and physical education principles in the elementary school.

PHED 393. WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTOR'S COURSE. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to train students to teach the American Red Cross Learn to Swin Program. Prospective students are advised to take Lifeguard Training (PHED 394). Course is conducted to meet the requirements of the American Red Cross Instructor's course. Certificates are awarded to those who qualify.

PHED 394. LIFEGUARD TRAINING. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: 1. Swim 500 yds. continuously, using each of the following strokes for 100 yds. each: front crawl, breaststroke and sidestroke; remaining 200 yds. student’s choice. No time requirement for this skill; 2. Submerge to a minimum of 7 ft. and retrieve a 10 pound object and return with it to the surface. No time requirement for this skill; 3. Tread water for two minutes using legs only. These skills will be tested the first class session.
A nationally certified course for Eastern Washington University students designed to teach lifeguard candidates the skills and knowledge needed to prevent emergencies and respond to aquatic emergencies (Professionalism, Prevention, Aquatic Rescues, CPR for the Professional Rescuer, First-aid and Spinal Injury Management). This course certification (National American Red Cross Lifeguarding) will prepare and qualify students for aquatic employment throughout the United States.

PHED 395. FIELD PRACTICUM. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Course designed to provide a minimum of 20 hours of practicum school experience in teaching physical education or coaching. The student works in an assistant capacity under a master teacher or coach (Elementary or Secondary Level). Journal procedures are planned and evaluated with the university instructor. At least two on-site visits are made by the instructor.

PHED 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

PHED 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

PHED 452. ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor.
Laws and skills required of Physical Educators for the inclusion of all students with physical, mental, or social disabilities within a least restrictive environment.

PHED 454. MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION IN HEALTH AND FITNESS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 303 or permission of the instructor.
This course assists in developing an understanding of assessment in health and fitness. The issues addressed include the importance of assessment for health and fitness, the components of assessment currently used in health and fitness, the development of personal beliefs about assessment, the matching of assessments to educational objectives, the evaluation of practice in relation to theory, and the need to reflect on actions to make necessary changes.

PHED 461. SPORTS AND EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior.
Designed to provide physical education teachers and coaches with information about motivation, communication, stress management, mental imagery and other topics for enhancing instructor-performance relationships and for stimulating improved sport performances.

PHED 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE: HEALTH AND FITNESS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HLED 365 and PHED 365 and senior standing or permission of the instructor.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
This comprehensive course is specific to health and fitness knowledge, skills and practical hands-on teaching experience with variable content. Students will develop outlines and lesson plans and practice generic and specific instruction and management skills necessary for effective teaching.

PHED 495. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean. Learning Contract must be on file before the internship commences.
This course is a full-time working experience with youth in a health and/or fitness promotion program. The experience is under the direction of an health and fitness professional or a person of equivalent training. An approved CEL.

PHED 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-10 Credits.

A course in the developmental stages.

PHED 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Workshops dealing with specific aspects of physical education are conducted either during the summer or by extension.

PHED 498. SEMINAR. 1-10 Credits.

PHED 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Study of selected problems in the field of physical education.

PHED 500. INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE STUDIES. 1 Credit.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit.
The purpose of this class is to introduce students to Eastern Washington University (EWU) and the Physical Education, Health and Recreation (PEHR) graduate school program.

PHED 505. CURRENT ISSUES AND ETHICS. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to prepare graduate students to make decisions based on the professional ethics and standards of practice.

PHED 506. SOCIO-CULTURAL STUDIES IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. 3 Credits.

An examination of the nature and place of sport in American life and an analysis of the interrelationship between sport and institutions, social systems and culture.

PHED 507. ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 3 Credits.

Planning, financing, designing, managing, and administering health, physical education, recreation and athletic facilities and programs.

PHED 508. PSYCHOLOGICAL BEHAVIOR IN SPORT. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: general psychology course.
An examination of individuals participating in play, games, sports, and their competitive behavior.

PHED 509. ADVANCED PEDAGOGY IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
A course detailing methods and procedures to teaching Physical Education classes and coaching athletic teams at all educational levels. The strong focus on advanced technology and methodology emphasizes that proper teaching/coaching procedures and techniques be employed in the instructional process, while allowing varying and personal teaching styles and attitudes to surface.

PHED 510. ADVANCED MOTOR CONTROL AND LEARNING. 3 Credits.

Provides the student with a comprehensive understanding of how physical movements are controlled and learned. Such an understanding is of practical importance to teachers and coaches of physical performers.

PHED 511. APPLIED SPORT PSYCHOLOGY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHED 508.
Provides comprehensive overview of applied educational strategies and techniques in sport and exercise psychology. Techniques such as imager, goal setting, self-talk, PRT and autogenies will be discussed as a means to achieve a prospective level of motivation, emotional control, self-confidence and concentration.

PHED 512. MOTIVATION IN SPORT AND EXERCISE. 3 Credits.

This class is designed to assist physical educators, coaches, recreation specialists, and others interested in sport motivation. Students will be introduced to a broad range of theoretical and applied motivational questions, including investigation of major motivational theories and paradigms, identification of primary motivational antecedents and consequences, as well as discussions on important measurement issues comparing the effectiveness of the most influential intervention strategies for enhancing motivation, and applying the motivational theory to answering critical applied motivational questions in sport and exercise.

PHED 517. SURVEY RESEARCH. 3 Credits.

The primary purpose of this course is to provide the student with a framework for the systematic evaluation of Physical Education, Exercise Science, and Recreation programs, services, facilities, and administrative functions as well as a basic understanding of the creation, implementation, and descriptive statistical analysis of survey research.

PHED 518. REVIEW OF LITERATURE. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHED 505 or permission of instructor.
Review of research literature to assist the student in identifying areas of research in their discipline.

PHED 519. STATISTICS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: grades ≥3.0 in any of the following upper-division courses (or equivalent): BADM 503, BADM 561; CSBS 320, DSCI 346; DSCI 449 MATH 380, MATH 485, MATH 486, PHYS 514, PSYC 522, PSYC 532.
Application, analysis and manipulation of datasets drawn from research in physical education using SPSS and SAS.

PHED 520. RESEARCH METHODS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PHED 518 and PHED 519 or permission of the instructor.
Study of the methods and techniques of research in physical education; practice in application to problems of current interest.

PHED 521. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY IN SPORT AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. 3 Credits.

This course is an examination of historical and philosophical issues pertaining to sport and physical activity as it relates to global culture. Topics will include ethics, sportsmanship, gamesmanship, play and cultural influences of sport and physical activity from a historical and philosophical framework.

PHED 522. RISK MANAGEMENT: SPORT AND SCHOOL LAW. 3 Credits.

This course is a study of legal issues as they relate to athletic administrators, coaches, teachers and sport management personnel in the sporting realm. Students will examine and discuss current legal standards, issues and risk management theories utilizing case law studies, which will provide an understanding of the responsibilities and working knowledge of the law.

PHED 523. PROGRAM PROMOTION AND ADVOCACY. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to assist students in developing or enhancing their promotional efforts in advocating for their selected program. If you are currently engaged in implementing promotional activities, this class will provide you with an opportunity to enhance your efforts. If you need to start a promotional project, this class will kick-start you.

PHED 524. SPORTS MARKETING. 3 Credits.

This course is a study of sports marketing theories from experience and research, which provides an examination of marketing strategies, plan development, sporting organizational needs and goals, in both the public and private sector of sports business. Students will also reflect upon the influence of licenses, sponsorships, promotions, advertising, broadcasting and sales in the sporting world.

PHED 525. FACILITIES PLANNING, OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with a framework for understanding various aspects of facilities in sport and recreation including: planning, management, design, scheduling, and operations.

PHED 550. ADVANCED BIOMECHANICS. 3 Credits.

An examination of the mechanical aspects of human movement with an emphasis placed on descriptive and causal analysis. Students will perform laboratory projects using force plates, digitization of movement, and electromyography. Undergraduate experience in physics or biomechanics is expected to enroll in this course.

PHED 554. BEHAVIOR CHANGE-THEORY AND PRACTICE. 3 Credits.

This course will provide an overview of various models and theories of behavior change as they relate to wellness. Emphasis will be placed on applying theoretical concepts to facilitate the behavior change process among individuals and groups using a positive psychology approach.

PHED 555. ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. 3 Credits.

The physiological effects of muscular exercise, physical conditioning, and training along with the significance of these effects on health and physical performance will be discussed. Students are expected to possess a background in undergraduate anatomy and physiology as well as a course in exercise physiology to enroll in this course. Check with your advisor if you are unsure about your preparation for this course.

PHED 556. ADVANCED CLINICAL EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY. 3 Credits.

The focus of this course will follow the requirements for the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist (RCEP) certification. The content will include how exercise impacts a variety of clinical conditions including cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, orthopedic, musculoskeletal, neuromuscular and immunologic/hematologic systems.

PHED 557. TRAINING, PLANNING AND PERIODIZATION. 3 Credits.

The content of this course will cover classical and modern theories of periodization as a means of maximizing performance in sport. Planning sports training in terms of the physical, technical, tactical, psychological, and theoretical domains will be discussed in depth from the career level to the individual training lesson.

PHED 595. GRADUATE INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

PHED 596. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-6 Credits.

PHED 597. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-6 Credits.

Notes: only one workshop course for up to 3 credits may be used to fulfill graduate degree requirements.

PHED 598. SEMINAR. 1-10 Credits.

Seminars dealing with special aspects of physical education.

PHED 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

PHED 600. THESIS. 1-9 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

PHED 601. RESEARCH REPORT. 1-6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

PHED 602. COMPREHENSIVE PREPARATION. 2 Credits.

Directed course of reading and study under the direction of a faculty member serving on the students comprehensive examination committee.

PHED 695. INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
The purpose of this course is to gain professional experience in the student's chosen career path under the guidance of a professional currently employed in the field. A wide variety of internship experiences are available including teaching, administration, marketing, research and professional writing.

PHED 696. COLLEGE TEACHING INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

Teaching a lower-division college course under supervision of a regular faculty member. Includes course planning, arranging bibliographical and instructional aids, conferences with students, experience in classroom instruction, completion of a departmental project and student course evaluation.


Recreation and Leisure Services Courses


RCLS 125. RECREATION AND LEISURE SERVICES ACTIVITIES. 1 Credit.

Notes: co-educational.
Backpacking, basic rock climbing, scuba diving, skiing (cross country), canoeing, and rafting.

RCLS 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

RCLS 197. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

RCLS 201. RECREATION AND LEISURE IN MODERN SOCIETY. 3 Credits.

An introduction and orientation to the professional opportunities, areas, requirements, and responsibilities involved in the professional preparation of recreation and leisure services administrators. Includes basic problems and trends influencing the status of recreation and leisure in our contemporary society. Covers history, definitions, and professional organizations.

RCLS 206. OUTDOOR LIVING SKILLS. 4 Credits.

Notes: offered fall quarter.
Pre-requisites: declared Outdoor Recreation Major or permission of instructor.
This class teaches the fundamental outdoor living skills needed to be proficient in wilderness backpacking and a variety of wilderness-based activities. Students will have the opportunity to learn the knowledge and skills of wilderness backpacking, cooking in the backcountry, navigation, wilderness leadership, trip planning, risk management, and environmental ethics. These skills are consistent with core competencies outlined by the Wilderness Education Association. A 4-day backpacking trip is required to complete this course.

RCLS 220. LEADERSHIP IN RECREATION AND LEISURE SERVICES. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: must be a declared Recreation Major (Outdoor Recreation, Therapeutic Recreation or Recreation and Tourism Management) or Challenge Course Management and Leadership Minor or permission of instructor.
Emphasis on the elements of leadership in the recreation setting. Designed to provide ideas on how to lead programs so they fit participant needs. Fieldwork is part of the requirement.

RCLS 225. FACILITATION TECHNIQUES. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 220.
This course teaches advanced leadership and facilitation skills for group initiatives and teambuilding activities. This course covers topics that are vital to the framework for developing teambuilding and group facilitation programs and sessions. Topics discussed include selection of appropriate challenge activities to meet the needs of a specific group, understanding group dynamics, group goal setting and assessment, sequencing, framing, debriefing techniques and leadership considerations for individual and co-leader facilitation. Fieldwork is part of the course requirements.

RCLS 230. WHITEWATER KAYAKING. 2 Credits.

This course is designed to instruct paddlers in whitewater kayaking techniques. The course will emphasize the essential skills needed for paddling moderately difficult rivers. The basic kayaking skills that are taught in the course include: paddle strokes, boat control, and basic whitewater safety information.

RCLS 240. OVERVIEW OF THERAPEUTIC RECREATION SERVICES. 4 Credits.

FALL/SPRING This course focuses on understanding the basic problems, needs and strengths of all disability groups in relation to developing and implementing a therapeutic recreation program.

RCLS 250. CAMP ADMINISTRATION AND LEADERSHIP. 3 Credits.

This course covers the philosophy, objectives, planning and operation of camps. It also provides an overview of counselors' responsibilities, programming, marketing, health and safety, as well as individual and group guidance techniques and trends.

RCLS 260. ARTS IN RECREATION. 3 Credits.

This course presents several media of art, i.e. mask making, clay, paper art, music and physical movement, and delves into the historical and cultural interpretations of each medium. Hands on application and practice with the medium follows, accompanied by teaching guidelines and discussion of adaptations for various populations.

RCLS 270. DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN RECREATION AND LEISURE SERVICES. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 201 or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to enhance understandings of leisure in a diverse society. Students examine factors that influence leisure, explore how leisure mirrors broader cultural values, and learn ways to use leisure to expand their own cultural understandings. In addition, students learn to think critically, understand and respect different perspectives, and appreciate the cultural and contextual nature of their leisure choices and actions.

RCLS 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

RCLS 297. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

RCLS 300. PUBLICITY AND PROMOTION IN RECREATION. 4 Credits.

Provides skills, techniques and ideas for designing visual aids, working with the media and developing a five-step promotion package for recreation and leisure service agencies.

RCLS 305. WINTER CAMPING. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 206 or permission of the instructor.
Introduction to winter camping and modes of oversnow travel such as showshoeing and cross-country skiing. Emphasizes skill development in winter camping techniques, natural shelter construction, and equipment familiarization, supported through field experience.

RCLS 307. MOUNTAINEERING. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 305 or permission of the instructor.
Designed to provide a comprehensive program of basic mountaineering. Intensive consideration given to snow and glacier travel as well as other skills necessary for safe alpine mountaineering. Includes two weekend field trips.

RCLS 310. OUTDOOR RECREATION. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the broad spectrum of outdoor recreation. The course materials are designed to explore the following aspects of outdoor recreation: agencies affecting the management of outdoor recreation experiences; concepts of wilderness and wilderness management; a review of the pertinent issues related to those who work in the field. Responding to the challenges of building a career in the field of outdoor recreation, the focus of this course will be in designing, planning, interpreting, and transferring outdoor recreation experiences. This course will rely on a combination of critical reading, creative thinking, exploratory writing and group participation to enable the student to broaden her or his understanding of the expansive domain of the outdoor recreation industry.

RCLS 313. WILDLAND RECREATION MANAGEMENT. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 201.
This course is designed to provide an overview of wildland recreation management history, principles, practices and contemporary issues. An additional emphasis of the course is to expose students to the seven principles that guide the mission of the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics.

RCLS 315. WILDERNESS SURVIVAL. 3 Credits.

Provides basic life-support skills and information to help you predict and prepare for the types of emergencies you are likely to encounter in a particular geographic location. Course includes an overnight encounter with limited supplies.

RCLS 321. CHALLENGE COURSE LOW ELEMENT. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 220.
In this course students will learn proper facilitation skills for spotted activities and low challenge course elements. Topics discussed include: program safety, standard operating practices and procedures, assessing the physical, human and social environment to improve participant safety and program effectiveness, various spotting techniques, conducting low element inspections, equipment maintenance and risk management for low challenge courses. Students will be introduced to current challenge course industry standards for low challenge course elements. Course requirements include hands-on experience and spotting at low height.

RCLS 325. OUTDOOR ADVENTURE PROGRAMMING. 3 Credits.

A survey of outdoor adventure education programs. Includes historical development and future trends as well as methods of intiating outdoor adventure education within a curriculum or program.

RCLS 330. INTERMEDIATE WHITEWATER KAYAKING. 2 Credits.

Notes: Further instruction and development is advised upon the completion of this course. The ACA recommends completing an advanced whitewater kayaking class as the next step in the student progression. See the instructors of this class or go to www.ACA.org for more information.
Pre-requisites: permission of instructor.
The course is best suited for paddlers who have continued to develop their kayaking skills and acquire experience in the whitewater environment, including the ability to reliably roll a capsized boat in Class II whitewater. The intermediate kayaking skills and information taught in this course emphasize developing good judgment and decision-making skills; group management; developing an ethic of environmental stewardship; intermediate paddling techniques and mechanics; the presentation of on-water scenarios to assess risk, evaluate rapid features, and develop strategies; and the principles of safety and rescue for individuals and groups.

RCLS 340. AQUATIC FACILITIES MANAGEMENT. 3 Credits.

Emphasis on pool, beach, and lake properties concerning operation, administration, maintenance, supervision, trends, water chemistry, health and safety, public relations and other aquatic topics.

RCLS 345. THERAPEUTIC RECREATION FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: declared Therapeutic Recreation Major or permission of instructor.
This course covers the information necessary for you to identify, define and describe major physical disabilities including their implications for therapeutic recreation programming.

RCLS 349. YOUTH SPORTS MANAGEMENT. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to the primary responsibilities of a programmer or administrator in the youth sports management setting. Topics include managing risk, finances, leagues and tournaments, parents, coaches, and referees.

RCLS 350. RECREATION PRACTICUM. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 201.
Direct observation and on-the-job participation in the programming and operation of recreation programs within the local recreational community to enhance your programming, scheduling, and leadership techniques under a supervised situation.

RCLS 351. FIELD PRACTICUM. 1-15 Credits.

Involves the practical application of theoretical concepts and recreation-related skills in a recreation and leisure services organization. Requires three (3) hours of work, per week, for every credit assigned, i.e.; one credit equals thirty hours of work over a ten-week period. Students must document their work in accordance with PEHR department policies.

RCLS 352. CHALLENGE COURSE TECHNICAL SKILLS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 220.
In this course students will learn proper technical and facilitation skills for high challenge course elements. Students will be introduced to current challenge course industry standards for challenge course installation, inspection, operations and certification. Topics discussed include equipment, spotting techniques, belay techniques and systems, knot tying skills, challenge course set-up and breakdown, challenge course terminology, proper safety guidelines and risk management. Course requirements include hands-on experience and climbing at height.

RCLS 353. CHALLENGE COURSE ADVANCED TECHNICAL SKILLS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 352.
In this course students will expand their technical skills for both low and high challenge course elements. Current challenge course industry standards for challenge course installation, inspection, operations and certification will be emphasized and reviewed. Topics discussed include emergency management including executing high course rescue techniques, understanding critical applications and climbing in a leading edge environment, learning advanced belay systems and descending techniques and developing technical teaching skills for the challenge course environment. Course requirements include hands-on experience and climbing at height.

RCLS 360. FACILITY PLANNING AND ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 201 and junior standing or permission of the instructor.
Design and trends in recreation facilities, as well as knowing environmental design techniques, environmental impact statements, and inter-agency cooperation. Field work is part of the requirement.

RCLS 365. SKIING FOR THE HANDICAPPED. 2 Credits.

This course is designed to acquaint you with current alpine teaching progressions and their applications to skiing for the handicapped. You are assigned a handicapped skier to work with during the quarter.

RCLS 370. OUTDOOR RECREATION AQUATIC PROGRAMS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 125 Rafting.
An overview of major outdoor aquatic adventures such as river rafting and kayaking. Emphasis placed on developing a fundamental awareness of skills necessary in each activity in addition to logistical and business aspects of conducting excursions.

RCLS 375. INTERMEDIATE WHITEWATER RAFTING TECHNIQUE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 125 Rafting or permission of the instructor.
The course focuses on intermediate rafting techniques and the development of leadership procedures in paddle rafts. River skills and guide competencies will be developed through hands-on experience. Emphasis will be placed on good decision making and safety concerns fot rafting on fast flowing class III and IV whitewater. Leadership skills will be developed by students learning to be river guides and maneuvering heavy rafts on the most difficult whitewater section of the Spokane River. A three-day field trip is required.

RCLS 385. PROGRAMMING IN RECREATION AND LEISURE SERVICES. 3 Credits.

FALL/WINTER This course presents steps to programming within the role and structure of public and private recreation services. Special focus is placed on determining participant needs and values, brainstorming, selection and implementation of ideas, evaluation techniques, and volunteer recognition and retention. Fieldwork is part of the requirement.

RCLS 395. INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
An opportunity to gain field experience with various recreation and leisure service agencies.

RCLS 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

RCLS 400. LEGAL FOUNDATIONS IN RECREATION AND LEISURE SERVICES. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 201 and RCLS 220 or permission of the instructor.
This course includes the major considerations necessary to comply with legal safeguards in the leisure service profession.

RCLS 405. WILDERNESS UPGRADE FOR MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: HLED 194 or permission of the instructor.
This course will provide the necessary skills to assist an injured or ill person in a wilderness environment where advanced medical help is delayed by time, terrain, weather or distance. The focus of this class is on the acquisition of skills and knowledge to be able to assess a victim's condition, make an appropriate decision regarding treatment, use available or otherwise improvise the necessary supplies or equipment to manage the patient's condition and implement a plan for evacuation.

RCLS 410. OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 201 and RCLS 220 and junior standing or permission of the instructor.
A culmination of the outdoor recreation and skill-oriented courses with an emphasis on the concepts of outdoor leadership. Offers opportunities in group dynamics, program planning. Objective is to foster necessary attitudes and leadership skills related to adventure programing in outdoor recreation through field experiences. Includes two weekend field trips.

RCLS 415. SEARCH AND RESCUE MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor.
A practical approach to learning search and rescue techniques and management. Emphasis on administrative procedures. A variety of resource specialists will present portions of the course.

RCLS 420. PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION IN THERAPEUTIC RECREATION. 4-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: declared Therapeutic Recreation major or permission of instructor.
The purpose of this course is to suggest various activities used in rehabilitation of the disabled. The selection of activities is made using a social-behavior skill factor analysis of the activity lab.

RCLS 425. EVALUATION, RESEARCH AND STATISTICS IN RECREATION AND LEISURE SERVICES. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 385 and junior standing or permission of the instructor.
Covers basic methods of personnel and program components. Methods of sampling and survey techniques are addressed as they relate to recreation and leisure services.

RCLS 435. EMPLOYMENT PROCESSES IN RECREATION AND LEISURE SERVICES. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 201, RCLS 220 and senior standing.
Designed to introduce the recreation student to the employment process: recruiting, application and resume screening, interviewing, checking of references, hiring, on-the-job training and probationary period.

RCLS 440. PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN THERAPEUTIC RECREATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: declared Therapeutic Recreation Major or permission of instructor.
Informs students of the constant changes and developments in the therapeutic recreation profession.

RCLS 445. PROCESSES AND TECHNIQUES IN THERAPEUTIC RECREATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: declared Therapeutic Recreation Major or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to assist therapeutic recreation majors with the mastery of skills, attitudes and knowledge required for professional service in therapeutic recreation. Special attention given to the therapeutic recreation specialist as a therapist in a medical model.

RCLS 450. ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES IN THERAPEUTIC RECREATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: declared Therapeutic Recreation Major or permission of instructor.
This course enables the Therapeutic Recreation major to develop an understanding of the process of assessment and use of appropriate standardized tools used by the profession with an in-depth study of the most widely accepted tools.

RCLS 455. RESORT AND COMMERCIAL RECREATION MANAGEMENT. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 201 and RCLS 385.
This course is intended to provide working management knowledge related to resort and commercial recreation enterprises.

RCLS 460. SUPERVISION OF THERAPEUTIC RECREATION SERVICES. 4 Credits.

This class will introduce the concepts, theories and practices of effective supervision in the health and human service delivery system. Covers the essential elements of supervision that are pertinent to being an effective practicing therapeutic recreation supervisor in either a clinical setting or a community-based therapeutic recreation setting.

RCLS 462. FOUNDATIONS OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM. 3 Credits.

Notes: offered spring quarter.
Pre-requisites: RCLS 455 or permission of instructor.
This course provides students with an introduction and overview of the travel and tourism industry including historical, behavioral, societal and business aspects of travel and tourism. Narrowing in focus, students learn about the impact of tourism on communities and strategies for sustainability. Students examine various sectors of the tourism industry and have the opportunity to explore their own special areas of interest.

RCLS 463. GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP AND INTERNATIONAL TOURISM. 4 Credits.

Notes: offered spring quarter.
Students explore global citizenship with regard to travel and tourism. In particular, students examine ethical dilemmas in travel and tourism and learn how to research and identify environmental, socio-cultural and economic impacts of tourism on the destination.

RCLS 465. SEMINAR IN TRAVEL AND TOURISM. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 462 or permission of the instructor.
This course is designed to offer recreation management majors an insight into some of the multidimensional and complex issues currently seen in the travel and tourism industry. Students explore, problem solve, report, and discuss current issues as presented in a series of tourism case-study scenarios. In addition, students gain hands-on experience by planning and implementing a seven-day field trip to a major tourist destination or city.

RCLS 470. ADMINISTRATION, ORGANIZATION AND SUPERVISION IN RECREATION AND LEISURE SERVICES. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 425 and senior standing or permission of the instructor.
Local, state, and federal recreation and park programs; their organization and administration, and their relation to other social institutions; special emphasis on planning, financing and legislative provisions, governmental control, budget, personnel, departmental organization and administrative practices, especially on the local level.

RCLS 475. CHALLENGE COURSE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATION. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 353.
In this course students will learn the skills needed to properly maintain the overall operation of a challenge course program. Students will gain an understanding of current challenge course industry standards and how to implement them effectively in a challenge course program. Topics discussed include challenge course program administration and management, site specific operational polices and procedures, program philosophy, documentation, risk management, insurance, staff supervision and technical accountability of the challenge course.

RCLS 480. BUDGETING IN RECREATION AND LEISURE SERVICES. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 201 and RCLS 385 or permission of the instructor.
This course is designed to identify both traditional and innovative methods of financing recreation services at the public and private level along with an analysis of personal spending and budgeting procedures. A complete budget document for a selected organization will be developed.

RCLS 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE IN RECREATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: RCLS 470 and senior standing.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
This course is designated as the capstone course for those students majoring in recreation and leisure services within the Department of PEHR. An end-of-program assessment will be completed for each major. The course will focus on the major issues and problems facing recreation professionals as they enter the field. Using group problem solving techniques, lecture and a research paper, the students will present and defend a position on an issue or develop and defend a solution to an existing problem. A major focus will be for the students to further develop their understanding of the group process as it relates to being a member of a team as well as the ability to effectively use resources to develop a research paper.

RCLS 493. THERAPEUTIC RECREATION PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. 12 Credits.

Pre-requisites: declared Therapeutic Recreation Major and compliance with RCLS Department’s internship requirements or permission of instructor.
Full-time working experience in a therapeutic recreation service setting in line with student's professional aspirations. Actual involvement in recreation and program planning; implementation supervision and program evaluation under professional and faculty supervision.

RCLS 494. OUTDOOR REC PROF INTERNSHIP. 12 Credits.

Pre-requisites: compliance with RCLS department’s internship requirements; permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Full-time working experience in an outdoor recreation service setting in line with your professional aspirations. Actual involvement in recreation and program planning; implementation supervision and program evaluation under professional and faculty supervision.

RCLS 495. RECREATIONAL MANAGEMENT PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. 12 Credits.

Pre-requisites: compliance with RCLS department’s internship requirements; permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Full-time working experience in a recreation and leisure service setting in line with your professional aspirations. Actual involvement in recreation and program planning; implementation supervision and program evaluation under professional and faculty supervision.

RCLS 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-15 Credits.

RCLS 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Periodically scheduled special workshops deal with aspects of recreation and leisure services.

RCLS 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Periodically scheduled special seminars deal with aspects of recreation and leisure services.

RCLS 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Selected problems in the field of recreation and leisure services.

RCLS 542. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

RCLS 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-10 Credits.