Planning

This is an archived copy of the 2016-2017 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ewu.edu.

2016 page images

Dick Winchell, Chair
department page
668 N. Riverpoint, Suite A
Spokane, WA 99202 509.828.1218

Many social, physical, economic, technical and political issues in society cry out for definition and resolution. Among these are: sustainability and climate change, decline in central cities, deterioration of neighborhoods, inefficient and inequitable taxing and regulation policies, congestion and other problems of accessibility, the impact of growth and change, an erosion of natural resources including water, land and air, and inefficient or absent human services. Urban and regional planning is one of society’s means for addressing these problems in a creative, positive manner. Planning is a problem-solving profession that is concerned with the forces that influence the quality of life in the neighborhood, city, region, state, nation and world. Thus, planning provides a unique occupational avenue for those who desire a role in shaping a better future.

The mission of Eastern’s programs in Urban and Regional Planning is to provide quality professional planning education, research, and community service with an emphasis on problem solving at the local level. To achieve this goal, the department stresses the acquisition of practical, analytical and organizational skills designed to aid the student in analyzing problems and organizing community activities to help solve problems. The combination of classroom instruction and applied planning field projects develops professional competence and ensures that each student has the requisite abilities to function within the profession after leaving the program. The department takes particular pride in having the only accredited undergraduate planning degree in the Northwest and one of only 14 in the nation, plus one of four accredited MURP degrees in the Northwest.

The department is housed in excellent academic facilities at the EWU Spokane Campus and the Cheney Campus and has excellent space and resources for students: drafting studio facilities, computer terminals, computer labs, wireless internet, a geographic information systems (GIS) laboratory, as well as access to a variety of other campus and community resources.

Planning Scholarships for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

The Planning programs provide the following scholarships for planning majors.  Applications are available in the Spring quarter of each year.

  • The Frank Schaedegg Memorial Scholarship award ($1,500)
  • The Washington Chapter APA Scholarship for an undergraduate or graduate student ($3,000)
  • King Cole Scholarship ($1,250)
  • Leonard Zickler Scholarship ($1,250)
Awards Program Information

The Planning Programs conduct an annual awards program, with the College of Business and Public Administration to recognize students for work accomplished during their academic careers. These awards include:

Undergraduate Scholarship Award: awarded to the graduating senior whose academic achievement has been out-standing.

Graduate Scholarship Award: awarded to the graduating master’s degree candidate whose academic achievement has been outstanding.

Community Service Award: awarded to a graduating student who has accomplished noteworthy and exemplary contributions in public service to regional communities.

Professional Achievement Award: awarded to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding professional knowledge and skill in the performance of a professional internship or research project.

AICP National Professional Award: awarded by the Planning Accreditation Board (PAB) upon recommendation of the Planning faculty for one graduate and one undergraduate student that represent excellence in academic and professional planning.

Teaching Methods

The Planning programs emphasize the acquisition and application of practical professional skills. Therefore, students not only acquire knowledge in the classroom, but also are involved in field projects requiring systematic application of this information. These field projects are often linked to the programs’s community service function.  Our curriculum at both the undergraduate and graduate level focus plan making and methods as well as state of the art tools for data driven planning.

Community Service Information

The department has a long history of providing planning and community development services to urban neighborhoods, towns and cities throughout Eastern Washington through its community service program. This work is conducted either on a contract basis with these communities or through other mechanisms. This work provides students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills in realistic planning settings.

Internships Information

The Planning programs maintain an active internship program with local and regional planning agencies throughout the Northwest. Internships are encouraged but not required. An intern gains valuable practical experience while earning credits toward the degree. Credit allocation is determined by the amount of time the student works in the agency.

Career Placement Information

The long-range job outlook for urban and regional planners is excellent, with most graduates pursuing a career in local or state government. There is an expanding need for planners in the private sector including consulting firms, land development companies and large corporations involved in land management and location analysis. Planners are also found in non-profit organizations involved in community problem solving. These positions complement more traditional jobs in the public sector including those dealing with comprehensive planning, land use regulation and transportation systems management. The department takes an active role in placing students and is proud of its continuing success in finding positions for its graduates. Agencies and organizations throughout the Pacific Northwest compliment the program for producing graduates who need little additional training to assume their employment  responsibilities.

Tribal Planning Curriculum

EWU has developed a special, long term relationship with American Indian Tribal governments and organizations, including the Affiliated tribes of Northwest Indians. EWU has developed coursework and service/applied research programs to serve and work with tribal governments. Tribal governments maintain sovereign status in relation to the federal government, which includes the power to plan. The Planning Programs offer courses in Tribal planning, a graduate specialization, and an Executive Certificate in Tribal Planning.


Faculty

Kerry Brooks, Gregg R. Dohrn, M. Veronica Elias, Margo L. Hill, Courtney Jensen, Ning Li, Roberta L. Russell, Anna Tressider, Richard (Dick) G. Winchell, Robert C. Zinke, Gabor Zovanyi.


Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Undergraduate Minor


Undergraduate Programs

General Admissions Information for Urban and Regional Planning: Students considering a major in planning should contact the Department’s undergraduate program advisor as early in their academic careers as possible and declare their Planning major.  Early counseling can help students select GECR courses which best complement their major course requirements. Transfer students should contact the Planning faculty advisor during their admission process to have their records reviewed and declare a Planning major.

In general, students that major in planning are encouraged to select their GECR courses from the following areas: physical and human geography, geology, biology, statistics, sociology, economics and government. Knowledge in these disciplines will aid students in their planning courses.

The university requires that all students receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree fulfill a foreign language requirement. Students who have had two years of the same language during their high school education or one year of the same language at the college level have fulfilled this requirement. This requirement applies to all planning majors. Undergraduates seeking a degree in planning must complete this requirement including students transferring with an associate of arts degree. If the requirement has not been completed prior to admission to the program, the student, in consultation with the Planning faculty advisor, will have to schedule the completion of their foreign language requirement during their tenure in the planning program.

Although there are no formal admission requirements for entering the undergraduate planning program, other than university requirements, acquisition of basic skills in English composition and mathematics is important preparation for the planning major. Normally, students who enter the program as second or third quarter sophomores or juniors should have completed these requirements. Those students who have not will be expected to complete these requirements within the first three quarters of their tenure in the planning program.

Credit Through Evaluation

Students with life experiences that are closely related to work in the planning profession, community organizing or other similar work, can have a faculty member review their work for credit through evaluation. Credits toward the degree requirements can be granted if these life experiences are sufficient. Credits gained through evaluation are applied to the elective credits in the major.

Required courses in the following programs of study may have prerequisites. Reference the course description section for clarification.

Graduate Degrees

Master's of Urban and Regional Planning (MURP)

Alternate Degree Options

  • Master of Urban and Regional Planning with Master in Public Administration
  • Master of Interdisciplinary Studies with a Planning emphasis

Graduate Certificates


Graduate Program

Kerry Brooks, Graduate Advisor
EWU Spokane, SEWC Building
668 N. Riverpoint Blvd., Suite A
Spokane, Washington 99202-1661
509.828.1230

Alternative Degree Options

  • Dual Degree with MPA
    • The Urban and Regional Planning Programs and the graduate program in Public Administration offer a dual-degree program in Planning and Public Administration. Student will receive two Masters degrees, the MURP and the MPA upon completion of this curriculum.  However, students who complete these programs will not be considered to have graduated from the accredited program as described above without fulfilling all of the above requirements in addition to those specified in the dual degree program.
  • Master of Interdisciplinary Studies with a Planning Emphasis
    • In addition to the MURP, students may elect to complete an Interdisciplinary Master’s Degree by arranging a set of courses with two or more departments. In this case, students receive the appropriate degree, MA or MS, but not the MURP degree.

Students interested in either of these options must contact the Planning program's advisor and have approval to register.

Graduate Certificate in Regional Economic and Public Policy Analysis

The Graduate Certificate in Regional Economic and Public Policy Analysis offers the opportunity to expand and enhance quantitative skills to analyze policy issues such as the regional economic impact of proposed housing projects, plant closures, or social program expansions. The focus of the certificate is on the development of analytical methods of economics and statistics; identification of appropriate statistical information for regional analysis; application of tools, methodologies and techniques of policy analysis; and the use of analytical tools and methods such as GIS, input-output analysis, regression analysis and computer modeling.

The REPA Certificate is a 28 credit curriculum that can be a part of a graduate program at EWU or a stand-alone certificate.  All students must complete the graduate admissions requirements. 

Students in the certificate program should consult with their appropriate advisor: the Planning and Public Administration Department Chair or the Economics Department Chair.

Registration

Before the first registration, students should consult the department’s graduate advisor for assistance in planning courses for the first quarter. The graduate advisor has responsibility for guiding the student until the student has selected a graduate committee. Once the committee has been selected, the chair of the committee provides guidance for the student.

To complete this degree in two years, students must take at least 12 credits per quarter. The load for a full-time graduate student is 12 to 17 hours per quarter. An additional charge will be assessed for credits in excess of 18. Students enrolling for more than 17 credits must have written approval from the program's graduate advisor or chair of their graduate committee plus the department chair.

Enrollment Requirements

Students admitted to the Master of Urban and Regional Planning Program must maintain continuous enrollment from the first matriculation until all requirements for the degree are completed. Enrollment may be met in one of the following categories:

  1. full-time enrollment of 10 credits or more;
  2. part-time enrollment of less than 10 credits;
  3. ​in absentia enrollment.

Graduate students are considered to be actively pursuing a degree from the first enrollment in the graduate planning program until graduation or until the limits described in this catalog have expired.

Under unusual circumstances, a student may petition for a leave of absence. If the petition is granted, the registration requirement will be set aside during that period of leave. Leaves will be granted only under conditions that require the suspension of all activities associated with the student’s degree program, including the research project. The leave of absence shall be for no more than one year. A written request for leave of absence shall be submitted to the student’s committee for approval. The recommendation shall be forwarded to the Graduate Studies Office.

Students who have completed all courses in their program other than PLAN 601 shall continue to register for at least 2 credits of planning courses until the degree requirements have been completed. An approved leave of absence is the only exception to this requirement.

Students who do not comply with these requirements for continuous enrollment will have their future registration blocked. They will be allowed to register only after receiving a favorable recommendation from the department’s faculty, the endorsement of the department chair and the approval of the dean of the College of Business and Public Administration.

Student’s Advisory Committee

After receiving admission to Graduate Programs and the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, the student will consult with the graduate Planning program advisor concerning appointment of the chair of the student’s advisory committee. The graduate committee administering the comprehensive examination shall, according to department policy, be comprised of three members: two faculty members from the Planning programs, with one serving as chair and a third faculty member from another academic discipline. The committee member from outside the student’s discipline may either be appointed by the Graduate Studies Office or students may elect to take the initiative and have a faculty member of their choosing appointed to the third committee position. If the second option is selected, students have the responsibility of approaching such potential members to secure their willingness to serve and the subsequent responsibility of notifying the Graduate Programs Office so that the willing outside members may formally be appointed to committee assignments.

No adjunct, part-time or other faculty located away from the campus may serve as chair of a student’s advisory committee, but they may serve as a member.

The student’s advisory committee chair has the responsibility for guiding and directing the entire academic program of the student. The student has the responsibility for initiating academic actions concerning the advisory committee. The chair of the advisory committee has immediate supervision of the student’s academic planning and research project. The chair also has the responsibility for calling required meetings of the advisory committee or other informal meetings considered desirable.  

The duties of the advisory committee include the responsibility for the degree program, the research or internship proposal, the research project, the internship report and the final examination. In addition, the advisory committee, as a group and as individual members, is responsible for counseling the student on academic matters and in the case of academic deficiency initiating recommendations to the Graduate Programs Office.

The student’s advisory committee will evaluate the student’s previous training and degree objectives. The committee will then outline a proposed degree program and a research problem. These activities along with the student’s other courses will constitute the student’s program. The student’s proposed degree program must be included in the Application for Degree Candidacy form. This form must be submitted to the Graduate Programs Office prior to the fourth quarter of registration, with endorsements by the student’s advisory committee and the graduate program advisor.

The advisory committee chair chair and the second planning faculty must meet together with the student to review and approve the student's research proposal by the end of the fourth quarter in the program.

Additional courses may be added to the approved degree program by the student’s advisory committee if such additional coursework is deemed necessary to correct deficiencies in the student’s academic preparation. Changes to an approved degree program can be made with the approval of the student’s advisory committee.

Research Project Reports

Successful completion of a research report is required for the degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning. Either an academic or applied research paper in the form of a report is required.  A research report must be the original work of the candidate but it may incorporate portions of plans the students completed as an intern or on funded research. Either type of report must be grammatically correct, reflect the candidate’s ability to express thoughts clearly and adhere to the format of articles and reports contained in the Journal of the American Planning Association. The research report shall also contain an abstract not exceeding 350 words and a vita page. Instructions relating to the specific requirements of either type of report may be obtained from the department office.

Final Comprehensive Examinations

The candidate for the degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning must pass a final examination. At the time of the final examination, a student’s cumulative GPA 3.0. There must be no unabsolved grades <2.0. The student must have completed all degree program course work with the exception of those courses scheduled during the quarter of the examination. Students who have not met these conditions are not eligible to take the final examination.

All students will be required to pass an oral examination during their final quarter. That oral examination shall consist of questions pertaining to the department’s curriculum and the candidate’s own areas of study. The examination may, at the discretion of the student’s committee, include a written component. In addition, all students are required to defend a research or internship report during the course of the final examination.

The final examination is conducted by the student’s advisory committee. The oral examination is open to the public; however, only committee members vote.

It is the candidate’s responsibility to schedule the comprehensive examination at a time agreeable to committee members and to notify the Graduate Programs Office at least two weeks prior to the examination date. In addition to complying with university procedures regarding such matters as deadlines and notification requirements, students within the department must also satisfy additional procedural requirements with respect to the written component of their final examinations. They must submit a research proposal for review and approval by their chair and second at the beginning of the student's fourth term of classes.  They must also submit an acceptable draft of their research or professional internship report to the chair of their committee no later than the end of the third week of the quarter in which they intend to graduate. In addition, they are also required to submit a final copy of such reports at least two weeks prior to the comprehensive examination.

Students must be registered at the university during the quarter in which the examination is given. A student shall be given only one opportunity to repeat the final examination and that shall be scheduled within the quarter following the first taking of the examination (summer quarter excluded).


Planning Courses


PLAN 100. THE CITY. 5 Credits.

Surveys the nature of transformations of cities during the course of their evolution from preindustrial to industrial to the postindustrial cities of today, and explains the factors that have contributed to these transformations.

PLAN 201. INTRODUCTION TO URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING. 5 Credits.

This lecture/discussion course uses a historical context to introduce the concepts, theories and applications of urban and regional planning.

PLAN 261. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT. 5 Credits.

Applied studies of the process of community development emphasizing the interactive roles of citizens, community officials and planners.

PLAN 271. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE. 2 Credits.

This course provides new majors a general overview of the practice of planning through discussion with planning practitioners and guided student activities.

PLAN 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-10 Credits.

PLAN 300. PLANNING PRESENT TECHNIQUES. 5 Credits.

Introduces the written, oral and graphic presentation techniques common to the the planning profession.

PLAN 301. PLANNING METHODS AND TECHNIQUES. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PLAN 201.
This course develops specific skills and techniques in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data commonly used in planning.

PLAN 302. CENSUS AND PLANNING. 2 Credits.

This course introduces students to census data and their application to planning research and provides background for demographic and other data useful in describing urban places.

PLAN 375. TRIBAL PLANNING. 3 Credits.

Presents an overview of Native American community and culture, the history of tribal government and its contemporary structures, and the applications of planning techniques to Native American communities. Emphasizes identifying appropriate planning techniques which promote tribal self-determination and preserve tribal sovereignty.

PLAN 395. INTERNSHIP. 1-10 Credits.

PLAN 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-10 Credits.

PLAN 398. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

PLAN 402. PLANNING IMPLEMENTATION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PLAN 201.
A survey of zoning, subdivision regulations and other tools used to implement public plans and policies. Introduces students to the administrative practices associated with the planning implementation process.

PLAN 403. COMMUNITY FACILITIES PLANNING. 5 Credits.

An examination of the issues and techniques associated with planning, budgeting and programming for community infrastructure such as sewer and water systems.

PLAN 406. PLANNING LAW AND LEGISLATION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PLAN 201 or permission of instructor.
Reviews the constitutional, statutory and case law governing public planning and regulatory activities, with specific emphasis on the legal aspects of regulating private lands to further public objectives and Washington state law.

PLAN 421. TRIBAL TRANSPORTATION PLANNING. 3 Credits.

This course introduces planning students and tribal members to the issues of transportation planning on Native American reservations.

PLAN 422. TRIBAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. 3 Credits.

This course provides an understanding of tribal economic development for tribal governments and how it is carried out by planners, economic development specialists and tribal leaders.

PLAN 424. STRATEGIC PLANNING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing.
This course presents an overview of strategic planning process components in public, private and government organizations. Components explored include mission, vision and value review, environmental analysis, identification of assumptions and premises, internal assessment, customer/market analysis both internal and external, critical strategic issues and plan operationalizing.

PLAN 430. ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING. 5 Credits.

Surveys the philosophy and techniques of environmental planning, emphasizing an understanding of why environmental considerations should be incorporated into land use planning activities and developing skills needed to carry out an environmental analysis.

PLAN 431. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PLAN 430 or permission of the instructor.
Individual and team field work in the preparation of environmental impact statements. A review of state and federal environmental legislation and procedural requirements.

PLAN 440. LAND USE PLANNING. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PLAN 300, PLAN 301 and PLAN 430.
Explores the issues and methods of analyzing and organizing land uses in urban and regional environments by balancing the demand for uses with the environmental conditions that limit the supply of the land.

PLAN 441. SITE PLANNING. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PLAN 430 or permission of the instructor.
A studio course in the application of site planning methods and principles to subdivision and site development.

PLAN 442. SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES. 3 Credits.

This course examines the case for sustainable urban and rural development and explores examples of efforts to create sustainable development.

PLAN 445. LAND DEVELOPMENT. 3 Credits.

A seminar in the financial feasibility analysis and packaging of land development projects with emphasis on the private land development process and its interaction with the public planning processes.

PLAN 446. DEVELOPMENT REVIEW. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PLAN 201 or permission of instructor.
This practice oriented course guides the student through the process of development review at the local level.

PLAN 450. TRANSPORTATION PLANNING. 5 Credits.

A lecture/studio class that explores the procedural and conceptual transportation planning process, including a framework for addressing system characteristics, institutional arrangements, theories of travel, supply and demand, selected forecasting models, and interactions with land use and other urban systems.

PLAN 451. WALKABLE COMMUNITIES. 2 Credits.

This course explores the relationship between urban form and pedestrian activity and the utility of having communities that are accessible and pedestrian friendly.

PLAN 457. SPECIAL TOPICS IN TRANSPORTATION. 2 Credits.

A workshop introducing knowledge and skills related to selected issues in transportation planning and policy. Topics vary each year. Recent topics included rural transportation planning, transportation of hazardous materials, and pedestrian and bicycle planning.

PLAN 460. URBAN DESIGN. 3 Credits.

This seminar explores the theory and techniques of analysis of the design of urban environments, emphasizing the impact local decision-making has on community aesthetics.

PLAN 465. HISTORIC PRESERVATION PLANNING. 3 Credits.

Presents the issues, policies and methods for preserving historic properties as a means for ensuring the longevity of the artifacts of our public heritage.

PLAN 466. MAIN STREET PLANNING. 2 Credits.

This class uses the Main™ Street model to inform students about a process for improving downtowns of small towns and neighborhood business centers.

PLAN 467. PARKS PLANNING. 5 Credits.

A studio which presents the basic theories and techniques of park planning through the design and development of a park planning project.

PLAN 469. BUILT ENVIRONMENTS OF NORTH AMERICA: SYMBOL AND STRUCTURE. 3 Credits.

Cross listed: GEOG 469 or HIST 469.
Pre-requisites: GEOG 101 or permission of the instructor.
This course is a survey of North American architectural landscapes from the colonial period to the present. This course will examine such topics as the diffusion of major styles of residential, commercial and public architecture across the continent, the relationship of geology and climate to the availability of building materials and technology and the effects of these on the human built environment, especially in the Pacific Northwest. Special emphasis will be placed on the visual differentiation of building styles and the symbolic, political and philosophical foundations of architectural form and decoration.

PLAN 470. COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION TECHNIQUES. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PLAN 261 or permission of the instructor.
A workshop on the application of skills and techniques of community development and participation, emphasizing personal growth, group formation and dynamics, consulting with groups, and creative change within groups.

PLAN 471. RURAL AND SMALL TOWN PLANNING. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PLAN 301 or permission of the instructor.
Discussion and research of the patterns of rural land use, emphasizing legislation, environmental characteristics, community values and anticipated land use demand.

PLAN 472. HOUSING. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PLAN 201, PLAN 261 or permission of the instructor.
Discussion and research into the nature of shelter, housing need, policy and programs, codes and standards, and housing assistance plans.

PLAN 473. PLANNING IN THE WESTERN U.S.. 3 Credits.

This course explores how historical context shapes planning in the western U.S. today, examines current problems/prospects of sustainable development in the west, and imagines potential ways of creating a society to match our scenery.

PLAN 476. COMPARATIVE URBANIZATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PLAN 261 or permission of the instructor.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
A review of the nature of urbanization in developed and developing countries, examining planning-related issues associated with urbanization, overurbanization and counterurbanization in a variety of natural settings.

PLAN 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE: PLANNING STUDIO. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: completion of 15 credit hours of planning courses.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
The culminating studio for undergraduates that demonstrates their abilities through the application of their knowledge and skills to a real community problem. Students typically work in consultation with practicing professionals for a community or agency in producing a planning-related product for use by the client.

PLAN 495. PLANNING INTERNSHIP. 1-10 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Supervised work in a public agency or with a private consultant. Daily journals are kept, a report is written on the work, and the student is evaluated by the supervisor and faculty member. One hour credit for each four hours of work per week per quarter.

PLAN 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

PLAN 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Conferences and short courses on selected planning topics are offered for credit from time to time. These may be on campus or in the communities.

PLAN 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Selected seminar discussions of various planning topics: law, land development, energy, futures, philosophy and practice.

PLAN 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the department chair and the instructor.

PLAN 500. PLANNING PRACTICE. 2 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the practice of planning through presentations and discussions with planning practitioners, lectures and guided student activities.

PLAN 501. FOUNDATIONS OF PLANNING. 5 Credits.

Survey of the history, theory, philosophy, and practice of planning. Subject matter treated during the course includes consideration of the nature of the planning profession's evolution, the profession's relationship to politics, the extent of ideological pluralism among planners, and the highly varied nature of professional planning activities.

PLAN 502. ADVANCED COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT. 5 Credits.

A survey of the structure and process of community development. Emphasis will be on the role of planners and community development specialists as agents for change in the context of community growth. Course will feature seminars and exercises in community problem solving, needs assessment, small group theory and process facilitation.

PLAN 503. PLANNING METHODS I. 5 Credits.

An introduction to planning process models, work programs, research methods, survey research, and descriptive and inferential statistics. Students also learn to present data graphically and orally.

PLAN 504. PLANNING METHODS II. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: BADM 504.
Pre-requisites: PLAN 503.
An introduction and application of population forecasting, economic analysis, and cost/benefit techniques and their application to planning problems. Students also learn to incorporate information from these techniques into professional planning reports and policy analysis.

PLAN 505. PLANNING IMPLEMENTATION AND LAW. 5 Credits.

Review of zoning, subdivision regulations, and other tools employed by planners to implement public plans and policies. Consideration of constitutional, statutory, and case law governing the realm of plan and policy implementation.

PLAN 506. PLANNING METHODS III. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PLAN 503, PLAN 504.
This is a case studies course focused on comprehensive planning demonstrating how the techniques from previous courses are applied in a comprehensive planning setting and how the functional areas of planning interact with the basic models learned in the previous courses.

PLAN 507. ADVANCED PLANNING STUDIO. 5 Credits.

Preparation of a major planning project for a community or other agency. Students work in cooperation with practicing professionals, conduct general research, perform analysis, develop specialized plans and draft implementation tools. Each student is assigned specific responsibilities on an interdisciplinary team.

PLAN 508. REFLECTIVE PLANNING THEORY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: second year of graduate program.
This course will present an overview of the range of the philosophical and methodological approaches to planning and their varying roles within the discipline. The emphasis is on examining professional knowledge and reflection in action to provide a contextual guide for planning practitioners as they enter the profession.

PLAN 510. COMMUNITY FACILITIES PLANNING. 5 Credits.

A seminar in the historical development of the planning profession in the United States tracing its roots from colonial town planning to the present. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of the profession and its efforts to cope with the changing urban environment.

PLAN 511. HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT. 2 Credits.

Health impact assessment (HIA) is an analytic and communicative public health process used to inform decision-makers about health impacts of proposed projects, programs and policies that do not traditionally focus on health outcomes, such as transportation, education and housing. HIA serves as a systematic way to shed light on the health consequences of a particular policy decision.

PLAN 512. GROWTH MANAGEMENT. 3 Credits.

An examination of techniques and strategies for affecting the amount, rate, location, and quality of growth. A review of existing efforts at local and state levels to manage growth. Consideration of the legal limits to growth management activities.

PLAN 514. LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLANNING. 3 Credits.

This course offers a review of the objectives, strategies, and techniques associated with economic development programs for cities, counties and towns. Students survey techniques including consideration of financial assistance programs, expenditures on public capital, and regulatory reforms. The course will examine ties between economic development, land use planning, and capital budgeting processes.

PLAN 515. DESIGN AND BEHAVIOR. 3 Credits.

This course explores the relationships between environment and human behavior with special emphasis given to the design and planning implications of this body of knowledge.

PLAN 523. AMERICAN INDIAN PLANNING. 4 Credits.

This course will outline the unique context of tribal governments as sovereign nations under the federal government, examine the history and evolution of tribal government institutions within the unique tribal cultural systems and describe the role and relationship of governance and planning within such a framework.

PLAN 524. ADVANCED STRATEGIC PLANNING. 4 Credits.

This course presents an overview of strategic planning processes and their application in public and private management including an overview of management theory and practice, organizational planning, program planning, program management, financial management planning and critical issue analysis.

PLAN 528. AMERICAN INDIAN HEALTH AND COMMUNITY. 4 Credits.

This course focuses on the history, traditional and current practices, and health implications of the American Indian population. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the federal obligation to tribes and tribal sovereignty, the behavioral response and resulting health issues. The course will also examine current health practices and current research with the American Indian population.

PLAN 529. AMERICAN INDIAN HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS AND SERVICES. 4 Credits.

This course focuses on American Indian health, to include the history, relevant laws and legal structure, and health implications of the American Indian population. Emphasis will be placed on history of Indian health care and the federal Indian policies, federal obligation to tribes and resulting health status of American Indians. The course will also examine inherent tribal sovereignty and the federal-tribal (government-to-government) relationship.

PLAN 530. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN INDIAN PLANNING. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: PLAN 523.
The purpose of this class is to provide a comprehensive overview and assessment of the current practice of planning on American Indian Reservations. Key topics include the powers to plan; the structures of tribal government and tribal planning; the tribal comprehensive plan; tribal planning regulations and ordinances; public engagement and tribal representation in tribal decision-making as part of planning; and critical research and development to identify and address long-term tribal needs and issues.

PLAN 531. CENSUS DATA FOR AMERICAN INDIAN PLANNING. 2 Credits.

The U.S. Census Bureau provides American Indian/Alaskan Native social and economic data critical for marketing, business, planning and public administration. This class offers an introduction to those data sets and their application to American Indian/Alaskan native and reservation populations for applied basic demographic, economic, business and housing data analysis. Students will complete a socio-economic profile for a selected reservation.

PLAN 532. AMERICAN INDIAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this class is to provide an understanding of tribal economic development for tribal governments, including data inventory, analysis, and how economic development is carried out by planners, economic development specialists, and tribal leaders. The class will review existing literature on tribal economic development, provide students with the skills and expertise to complete economic development analysis of tribal data and develop strategies and plans for economic development of American Indian reservations. The class will also discuss tribal entrepreneurship.

PLAN 533. AMERICAN INDIAN LAW FOR PLANNERS. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this class is to provide a comprehensive understanding of American Indian Law for planners. The complex structures of tribal powers in relation to federal, state, local governments, and the ability for tribes to complete plans, land use regulations and environmental regulations operate within the context of Indian Law. It is essential for tribal planners to have a strong understanding of key court cases, legal issues and powers that frame how tribal governments and tribal planning work.

PLAN 534. AMERICAN INDIAN TRANSPORTATION PLANNING. 4 Credits.

This class will provide a comprehensive understanding of American Indian tribal transportation planning including safety and community well-being. The course emphasizes the Tribal Transportation Plan as part of a community assessment, including existing frameworks and guidelines for transportation planning, program development, road construction and critical transportation needs assessment of safety, enhancement, tribal transit and intergovernmental relations.

PLAN 535. PLANNING, POLITICS AND PUBLIC POLICY. 4 Credits.

Far from studying neutral phenomena and attempting to solve objectively defined problems, the planning profession is permeated with conflict and dilemmas of normative and political nature, such as how to plan and for whom. “Planning, Politics and Public Policy” sets out to study planning as a profession deeply imbued in a complex socio-political context dominated by social, political, technical, cultural, organizational, and economic disparities. The course reviews both theoretical and practical aspects of urban planning and their relationship to the politics of policy-making process. It, finally, inquires about the role of urban and regional planning in a democratic governance context. The substance of this course will be presented through lectures, class discussions, guest speaker talks, field work assignments and group work and presentations.

PLAN 539. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-5 Credits.

Advanced planning topics will be offered periodically.

PLAN 540. LAND USE PLANNING. 5 Credits.

Explores the issues and methods of analyzing and organizing land uses in urban and regional environments by balancing the demand for uses with the environmental conditions that limit the supply of land and locates these uses based upon criteria that satisfy human needs.

PLAN 542. SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES. 3 Credits.

Examines the case for sustainable urban and rural development and explores examples of efforts to create sustainable developments.

PLAN 550. EMERGENT COMMUNITY HEALTH CHALLENGES. 4 Credits.

Critical issues in community health often impact large areas or regions and require interdisciplinary perspectives as part of effective policy analysis. The focus of this class is to identify and create an in-depth examination of a selected emergent community health challenge. The course will feature lectures, independent research, site visits, guest speakers and the exploration of competing public policy priorities such as economic development. The outcome of the class will be documentation of one emergent community health challenge.

PLAN 551. TRANSPORTATION PLANNING. 5 Credits.

A lecture class that explores the procedural and conceptual transportation planning process, including a framework for addressing system characteristics, institutional arrange- ments, theories of travel supply and demand, selected forecasting models and interactions with land use and other urban systems.

PLAN 552. COMPREHENSIVE COMMUNITY HEALTH PLANNING. 4 Credits.

The purpose of this class is to create frameworks for comprehensive community health planning through restructuring standard planning tools within local and regional government including community involvement. The class will assess current planning theory, models, tools and practice in a context of community health planning, including an examination of planning tools that can be used to assess and improve community health.

PLAN 553. COMMUNITY HEALTH PLANNING STUDIO. 5 Credits.

This planning studio will engage students in an applied project where students learn and demonstrate skills and professional applications of theory, models and processes. This is a hands-on planning course that will address a real life community health issue such as the preparation of a neighborhood or tribal health plan, HIA or the community wellness element of a comprehensive plan or neighborhood plan.

PLAN 560. AMERICAN INDIAN PLANNING STUDIO. 3 Credits.

A Planning Studio represents an application of planning methods and techniques in a comprehensive manner. Each student will design an applied research plan or project for a selected tribe, plus complete a “Portfolio” synthesis report incorporating tribal planning assignments and papers on a selected tribe from each class into a comprehensive assessment of tribal planning for that tribe.

PLAN 565. GIS FOR URBAN AND REGIONAL ANALYSIS. 4 Credits.

This course provides an opportunity to expand spatial data development and analysis skills in the context of applied, real-world planning and policy analysis problems. Topics include data development and management, enhanced knowledge of spatial analysis techniques, and mentored, hands-on application projects.

PLAN 570. ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING. 5 Credits.

Surveys the philosophy and techniques of environmental planning, emphasizing an understanding of why environmental considerations should be incorporated into land use planning activities and developing skills needed to carry out an environmental analysis.

PLAN 571. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW. 3 Credits.

Surveys the philosophy and techniques of environmental planning, emphasizing an understanding of why environmental considerations should be incorporated into land use planning activities and developing skills needed to carry out an environmental analysis and environmental review.

PLAN 572. RURAL AND SMALL TOWN PLANNING. 3 Credits.

Lectures, discussion and research of the patterns of rural land use that form rural areas and small towns, and the special rural and small town planning issues that emphasize legislation, environmental characteristics, community values and anticipated land use demand.

PLAN 589. TOPICS IN REGIONAL ECONOMIC POLICY ANALYSIS. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: PADM 589, ECON 589.
Pre-requisites: instructor permission.
The course serves as the capstone experience for the Certificate in Regional Economic Policy Analysis. In consultation and agreement with the course instructor, students will select some regional economic activity for intensive research and policy analysis. During their research students are expected to demonstrate the ability to utilize information, skills and techniques acquired in related Certificate courses. Successfully completion of the course will result in a research paper and a presentation appropriate for a professional conference.

PLAN 591. RESEARCH PROJECT PREPARATION. 1 Credit.

A seminar course designed to prepare students for their capstone research or professional internship report. Reviews research strategies, helps students select topics, produce a work program, and begin research on their project.

PLAN 595. GRADUATE INTERNSHIP. 1-10 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Students may participate in structured internships in agencies without the responsibility of using the internship as a capstone course. However, students must set learning objectives, maintain a journal of their experiences, and prepare a short report.

PLAN 596. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

PLAN 597. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

PLAN 598. ADVANCED PLANNING SEMINARS. 1-5 Credits.

Advanced seminar topics offered quarterly.

PLAN 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

PLAN 601. RESEARCH PROJECT. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: substantial completion of degree requirements and permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
A major planning project approved by the student's advisory committee. Students must file a record of study in the standard research format which will describe the approach, objectives, methods and conclusions of the project.

PLAN 695. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: substantial completion of degree requirements.
Professional field practice with private or public agencies. This internship is a capstone course requiring a focused internship project, approval by the student's committee, and the production of a formal report that reflects upon the internship utilizing the theories and methods learned during the student's tenure in the program.