Communication Sciences and Disorders

This is an archived copy of the 2016-2017 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ewu.edu.

Introduction

Lesli Cleveland, PhD, CCC-SLP, Chair
department page
509.828.1376
310 N. Riverpoint Blvd., Box B Spokane, WA 99202

Professionals practicing in Communication Sciences and Disorders are concerned with impairments and disabilities of speech, language, cognition-communication, voice and swallowing as well as hearing processes and disorders. A certified speech-language pathologist (SLP) is qualified to assess as well as plan and implement intervention programs for these disorders. A certified audiologist is qualified to provide diagnostic hearing assessment and rehabilitative services for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. Audiologists also work with auditory processing problems and dysfunctions related to balance.

The department has a strong clinical orientation that addresses the medical, developmental and educational issues that impact being a competent speech-language pathologist. The general goal (through the master’s degree) is to provide a sound academic background and to complement that instruction with clinical knowledge and experience sufficient to equip the student to provide professional services to individuals across a spectrum of communication disorders in a variety of employment settings. The baccalaureate degree is considered pre-professional. The master’s degree is required for licensure at the state and certification at the national level. Upon earning the master’s degree employment opportunities may include schools, clinics, hospitals, private practice and community agencies. However, the majority of the positions are in the public schools. The employment outlook for graduates remains excellent. It should be noted that Communication Sciences and Disorders is a speech-language pathology program only. To meet the requirements to become an audiologist, the student must earn a minimum of a clinical doctorate degree in audiology from an accredited program.

The Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders is located at the Health Sciences Building (HSB) on the EWU Spokane Campus. Clinical practica are conducted at the University Programs in Communication Disorders (UPCD) Hearing and Speech Clinic on the EWU Spokane Campus and in numerous off-campus sites in the area. All programs (undergraduate and graduate) are on a semester schedule.

The undergraduate Communication Sciences and Disorders program is designed to begin in the junior year following completion of university general education requirements (GECRs). Upon earning the bachelor’s degree, the student would then apply for graduate study. Individuals earning a bachelor's degree in another field can prepare for graduate training in communication disorders by first completing a post-baccalaureate year of selected junior and senior level courses in the department (see the separate section in this catalog entitled Pre-Professional Programs). Supervised clinical practicum is reserved for the graduate level.

Time to Completion of the Program

Most students complete the graduate curriculum in Communication Sciences and Disorders within five (5) semesters (i.e., fall, spring, summer, fall, spring). Some students may not complete the program within five semesters; these individuals typically have unfinished research and/or clinical practicum requirements that cause them to not complete the program within the typical time frame. If accepted for graduate study, students who enter the program with bachelor’s degrees outside the discipline can expect to complete their studies within seven (7) semesters (one year or two semesters of post-baccalaureate study and five semesters of graduate study).

Program Accreditation and Professional Certification Information

The graduate program in speech-language pathology is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA). The current period of accreditation is September 1, 2011 through August 31, 2019. Please check with the department website for further information. Additional information related to accreditation (e.g., complaint procedures, graduate employment rates, national exam pass rates, program completion rates, student assistance plan, etc.) can be found on the department’s website . Completion of the undergraduate curriculum and the Master of Science degree will allow the student to satisfy most of the requirements for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology (CCC-SLP) issued by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). The student must also pass a national examination and successfully complete a Speech-Language Pathology Clinical Fellowship (SLPCF) as prerequisites for earning the CCC-SLP.


Faculty

Lesli H. Cleveland, Donald R. Fuller, Roberta A. Jackson, Doreen A. Nicholas, Barbara M. Peregoy, Jane T. Pimentel, Elizabeth Wilson-Fowler.


Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Arts (BA)


Undergraduate Programs

Admission Information for High School Students

No specific courses are required. High school students may find it useful to take computer coursework, four years of English and any available speech, behavioral science and natural science courses.

General Admissions Requirements for Undergraduate Students

A minimum GPA ≥2.75 is required for admission to and retention in the undergraduate program. Students wishing to major in communication sciences and disorders must meet and maintain the minimum GPA requirement, complete a department application form and pay an application fee.

Admissions Information for Pre-Major Students

Freshman and sophomore students must complete their GECRs, university competencies and courses offered by other departments in support of the major prior to enrollment in the required Communication Sciences and Disorders courses within the major. In addition, students must complete coursework reflecting knowledge in the biological sciences, physical sciences, statistics and the social/behavioral sciences prior to beginning the program. Acceptable courses in biological sciences should emphasize a content area related to human or animal sciences. Acceptable courses in physical sciences should include physics or chemistry. Acceptable courses in social/behavioral sciences should include psychology, sociology, anthropology, gerontology or public health. Research methodology courses in communication sciences and disorders (CSD) may not be used to satisfy the statistics requirement. Entering the program prepared is imperative as the Communication Sciences and Disorders undergraduate program is on a semester schedule while the majority of the university is on a quarter schedule.

Admissions Information for Transfer Students

Transfer students must satisfy the GECRs and university competencies with equivalent coursework. The transfer student must demonstrate knowledge of the biological sciences, physical sciences, statistics and the social/behavioral sciences. Acceptable courses in biological sciences should emphasize a content area related to human or animal sciences. Acceptable courses in physical sciences should include physics or chemistry. Acceptable courses in social/behavioral sciences should include psychology, sociology, anthropology or public health.

EWU participates in transfer agreements with community colleges in Washington state and select Idaho and Montana community colleges. Graduates of these colleges who complete a direct-transfer associate degree are admitted to Eastern with junior standing and will have satisfied Eastern’s lower division general education requirements. In addition, to earn a Bachelor’s degree from EWU, students will need to have taken one course in International Studies and one course in Culture/Gender  (see University Graduation Requirements in catalog). If there are any questions or concerns the student should consult with Communication Sciences and Disorders faculty to plan their program.

Foreign Language Requirement for Communication Sciences and Disorders

A foreign language is required by Eastern Washington University for a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree. To fulfill this requirement, two years of a single foreign language in high school or one year of a single foreign language at the college level is required. American Sign Language (ASL 376, ASL 377 and ASL 378) is an excellent foreign language option for an individual majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders. It should be noted that ASL courses are taught on a quarter academic schedule so these courses should be taken prior to declaring Communication Sciences and Disorders as a major.

Policy Regarding Student Progress within the Major

In addition to maintaining an overall cumulative grade point average ≥2.75 to be retained in the program and to graduate with the BA degree, the student must earn a grade ≥1.7 or better in each of the courses within the major. Earning a grade <1.7 for any given course will require that the student repeat the course. If the course is a prerequisite for a higher-level course, the student will not be allowed to enroll in the higher-level course until a grade ≥1.7 or better has been earned in the prerequisite course. If a student’s cumulative GPA falls below a 2.75, the student is placed on academic probation and has one semester to raise their GPA to >2.75 or they will be dismissed from the program. Additionally, ASHA requires that the program regularly assess each student’s progress toward meeting knowledge and skills outcomes (KASA). Each course in the major has its own assessment plan with a built-in academic assistance plan for students who experience difficulty in the course. The program’s Student Assistance Plan can be found on the department’s website .

Required courses in the following programs of study may have prerequisites. Reference the course description section for clarification.

 

Graduate Degrees

Master of Science (MS)

Communication Disorders


The Master of Science degree is designed to equip the student with the academic and clinical skills required to function as a competent professional in the field of communication sciences and disorders. The master’s graduate is qualified to provide clinical services to a wide range of communication disordered children and adults in a variety of professional settings. Upon completion of the graduate program, the student will have met all requirements for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology (CCC-SLP) with the exception of the Speech-Language Pathology Clinical Fellowship (SLPCF). The student must also pass a national examination in speech-language pathology; most students take and pass the exam prior to earning the master’s degree.

The graduate curriculum includes exposure to science and research areas as well as to clinical disorders and related practice. The graduate curriculum is part of a cooperative program between Eastern Washington University and Washington State University–Spokane, and is known as the University Programs in Communication Disorders (UPCD). The UPCD is housed in the Health Sciences Building on the Spokane campus. The undergraduate and graduate curricula are administered on a semester academic schedule.

Admission Requirements/Preparation

Admission to the master’s program includes the requirements of the graduate school as well as the GRE general and writing tests, letters of recommendation, a statement from the applicant outlining professional interests and intent and an application fee. The program utilizes a central application system. Application and the supporting materials are to be submitted to the CSDCAS program , a separate application is to be submitted to the EWU graduate program office. All application materials must be received by January 15 prior to the fall academic term of enrollment. Students entering the program must have completed an undergraduate major in communication sciences and disorders. Students with an undergraduate major in any other field must complete a post-baccalaureate year of required communication disorders courses prior to applying to the graduate program (see the separate section of this catalog entitled Pre-Professional Programs). In addition, students need to take an introductory statistics course prior to graduate school, as it is a requirement for professional certification.

Course selections made by the student and a departmental faculty advisor can be individually tailored to the student’s professional goals. Course selection is guided by the knowledge and skills outcomes of the certification standards for the CCC-SLP as set forth by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).

According to current ASHA certification standards, it is expected that candidates for the master’s degree will have accumulated a minimum of 400 clock hours of clinical practicum with 25 hours spent in observation and 375 hours spent in direct client/patient contact. At least 325 of the 400 hours must be completed at the graduate level. This is accomplished by completing clinical practicum experiences (CMSD 561S CMSD 562S, and/or CMSD 563S) and taking one required semester of CMSD 697S. Completion of the Master’s degree and clinical experience qualifies the student for Washington state licensure in Speech-Language Pathology and makes that individual eligible for the CCC-SLP upon completion of the SLPCF and upon passing the national examination (referred to as the PRAXIS exam).

Students who intend to be employed in the public schools of this state must meet Washington state educational certification requirements, which include 3 semester credits of coursework and a Clinical Field Experience in the schools.

Research Requirement and Its Defense

All graduate students must complete a research project of some type (i.e., either thesis or non-thesis). The selection of research option is accomplished during the first semester of graduate study in CMSD 520S. Selection of a research advisor also takes place while the student is enrolled in this course. Only those students who show excellent aptitude in research and scientific writing are given the thesis option. A thesis is intended to be an empirical study that is formal and rigorous. The non-thesis option includes any type of research (e.g., case study, empirical study, survey, etc.) deemed appropriate by the student’s research advisor.

The fall semester of the first year of study is used to develop a research idea while enrolled in CMSD 520S. During the spring semester of the first year of study, the student and research advisor further refine the research idea and submit the proper paperwork to the Institutional Review Board, if required. The fall and spring semesters of the second year of study are used to complete and defend the research. Students who have been granted permission to conduct a thesis will enroll in 2 semester credits of CMSD 600S during the spring semester of their first year of study, and 2 semester credits of CMSD 600S during each of the fall and spring semesters of their second year of study, for a total of 6 semester credits of research. Students who conduct a non-thesis research project will enroll in CMSD 620S 2 semester credits during the spring semester of the first year of study, CMSD 621S 2 semester credits during the fall semester and CMSD 622S 2 semester credits during the spring semester of their second year of study, for a total of 6 semester credits of research.

Two faculty members from the combined UPCD faculty form the student’s research committee (the chair of the committee is the student’s research advisor). The research advisor should be an EWU faculty member who holds graduate faculty status. The second committee member may be either an EWU or WSU faculty member. The third member for the research defense may be selected by the department or the student and must be approved by the student's committee chair (see Graduate Programs Academic Policies for more information).

Toward the end of their graduate program, students orally defend their research project in the presence of their committee members and other interested parties. Students who complete a thesis will make a formal presentation in front of an audience and will entertain questions from their committee members and other interested parties. Students who complete a non-thesis project will develop a poster that will be put on display. Students will stand by their posters and entertain questions from their committee members and other interested parties. The research defense will take place during a designated Research Day that will typically take place during the latter half of the spring semester each year. In some instances, two or more Research Days may be designated; the student will only have to defend his or her research at one of these scheduled Research Days.

At the defense, the student’s research committee makes a decision as to whether or not the research project is successfully completed. If the research project is judged as not being successfully completed, the committee indicates what additional work must be accomplished and whether another defense will be necessary. If the research project is judged as complete and satisfactorily defended, a grade is assigned to the thesis or non-thesis research project.

Policy Regarding Student Progress

In addition to maintaining an overall cumulative grade point average 3.00 to be retained in the program and to graduate with the MS degree, the student must earn a grade 2.7 or better in each of the graduate courses taken (exclusive of practicum courses). Earning a grade <2.7 for any given course will require that the student repeat the course. If the course is a prerequisite for a higher-level course, the student will not be allowed to enroll in the higher-level course until a grade 2.7 has been earned in the prerequisite course. Additionally, ASHA requires that the program regularly assess each student’s progress toward meeting knowledge and skills outcomes (KASA). Each graduate course has its own assessment plan with a built-in academic assistance plan for students who experience difficulty in the course. The program’s Student Assistance Plan can be found on the department’s website .


Communication Sciences and Disorders Courses


COMD 301. INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY. 4.5 Credits.

This course provides an overview of speech, hearing and language development, disorders and remediation for students who may have an interest in this discipline as a career choice.


CMSD 301S. INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of speech, hearing and language development, disorders and remediation for students who may have an interest in this discipline as a career choice.

CMSD 304S. PHONETICS. 3 Credits.

This course examines the motor and acoustic aspects of speech production, description, and classification of English phonemes, and broad transcription using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA).

CMSD 320S. SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCES. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: completion of Natural Science GECRs or permission of the instructor.
This course is a study of acoustics and psychoacoustics of speech and hearing.

CMSD 321S. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF SPEECH PRODUCTION. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: completion of Natural Science GECRs or permission of the instructor.
This course is a study of anatomy, physiology and physics as related to speech and voice production.

CMSD 331S. LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT. 3 Credits.

This course examines the basic principles and sequences of language development; methods of observing, measuring, and describing children's acquisition of language.

CMSD 357S. LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CMSD 301S, CMSD 331S or permission of the instructor.
This course addresses the measurement as well as analysis of developing language as well as etiology, assessment and intervention for developmental language disorders.

CMSD 358S. SPEECH SOUND DISORDERS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CMSD 301S and CMSD 304S or permission of the instructor.
This course describes normal phonological and articulatory development as well as the etiology, assessment and intervention of articulation and phonological disorders

CMSD 371S. HEARING AND HEARING DISORDERS. 3 Credits.

This course is a study of aural anatomy and physiology, as well as etiology, pathology, and treatment of hearing impairment.

CMSD 372S. AUDIOMETRY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CMSD 301S and CMSD 371S.
This course is a study of acoustics and psychoacoustics, as well as principles of auditory testing and interpretation of hearing tests.

CMSD 405S. SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY IN THE SCHOOL. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor and fufillment of additional state requirements.
This course ideally precedes the student teaching experience. Information is provided about the special issues and problems encountered by professional practice in the public school setting.

CMSD 422S. NEUROANATOMY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CMSD 321.
This course is a study of the normal anatomy and physiology of the nervous system and its role in communication processes.

CMSD 441S. ASSESSMENT OF SPEECH AND LANGUAGE. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CMSD 301S, CMSD 304S, CMSD 320S, CMSD 321S, CMSD 331S, CMSD 357S, CMSD 358S, CMSD 371S, CMSD 372S.
This course addresses the principles and techniques for assessing communication disorders, including formal and informal assessment methods, practical experience in test administration, theoretical and ethical issues, report writing, and the relationship of assessment to treatment.

CMSD 442S. INTERVENTION FOR SPEECH AND LANGUAGE DISORDERS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing or permission of instructor.
This course addresses the development of intervention plans, including intervention strategies and rationale, construction of daily therapy plans, methods for data collection, and interpretation and evaluation of therapy outcomes.

CMSD 450S. LANGUAGE AND LITERACY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CMSD 331S.
Building upon CMSD 331S, this course examines the relationship between early language development and later development of literacy skills. Issues related to language disorders and concomitant deficiencies in literacy acquisition will be discussed.

CMSD 451S. NEUROGENIC COMMUNICATION DISORDERS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CMSD 422S or permission of the instructor.
This course provides an introduction to the etiology, assessment and intervention of communication disorders associated with neurological disorders.

CMSD 452S. TOPICS IN CONTINUING EDUCATION. 0.75-3.5 Credits.

This course is offered in cooperation with the Meadowood Speech and Hearing Camp in Pendleton, Oregon. Student volunteers earn college credit while learning state of the art strategies working with children exhibiting a variety of speech, language, and hearing disorders.

CMSD 455S. VOICE AND RESONANCE DISORDERS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CMSD 321S.
This course addresses the anatomy and physiology of the vocal mechanism with an overview of functional, congenital, and acquired voice disorders.

CMSD 456S. FLUENCY DISORDERS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing or permission of the instructor.
This course provides definitions and descriptions of fluency disorders, discussing their effects on the speaker and listener. It examines various theories of the etiology of stuttering as well as its assessment and treatment in children and adults.

CMSD 461S. CLINICAL METHODS. 2 Credits.

Notes: must be taken twice for the PB Certificate.
Pre-requisites: senior standing or permission of instructor.
This course offers students the opportunity to observe communication disorder assessment and intervention. The students will be introduced to the basic essential ingredients of good therapy. The skills will be introduced and discussed in a classroom setting and reinforced through guided observation of speech-language and audiological assessment and intervention services within a clinical setting. Limited supervised practicum in the assessment and treatment of individuals with communication disorders may be assigned.

CMSD 473S. AURAL REHABILITATION. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: COMD 371 and COMD 372, or permission of the instructor.
This course addresses the objectives, theory and techniques used in managing hearing impairments of individuals.

CMSD 480S. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing.
This course provides an overview of research methodology in the field of communication disorders. It is designed to familiarize the student with basic elements of reading, understanding, and evaluating research. The student learns about the scientific method, the difference between basic and applied research, and important terms used in the research process.

CMSD 490S. SENIOR CAPSTONE: PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing or permission of the instructor.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
This course focuses on the integration of the knowledge the student has accumulated in the field of communication disorders and its application to issues affecting both professionals and individuals served. The course will strive to facilitate students’ thinking on these issues by requiring the completion of an assignment in which students must integrate their body of knowledge in the profession and apply it to a novel issue or problem.

CMSD 495S. INTENSIVE STUTTERING INTERVENTION: SSMP. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
The Successful Stuttering Management Program is an intensive clinical experience/seminar where students learn the foundation of Stuttering Modification Therapy as they work independently and collaboratively with other students and their supervisors. The Successful Stuttering Management Program is designed for adolescent and adult stutterers.

CMSD 496S. EXPERIMENTAL. 1-3 Credits.

Experimental.

CMSD 497S. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-3 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
Workshop, short course, conference, seminar.

CMSD 498S. SEMINAR. 1-3 Credits.

Seminar.

CMSD 499S. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
This course is provided to allow the student to study a selected special topic within the discipline of communication disorders on an individual basis and under the direction of a program faculty member.

CMSD 520S. RESEARCH METHODS. 3 Credits.

This course inaugurates the studentss research experience in the discipline. It emphasizes the importance of research to a scientific field and acquaints the student with the research literature. By the end of the course, students will have completed the introduction, review of literature and question components of their research proposals.

CMSD 538S. PHONOLOGICAL ACQUISITION AND BEHAVIOR. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
This course involves advanced study in the theoretical background of the acquisition and development of the phonological system. The relationship between the phonological system and disorders and remediation will also be discussed.

CMSD 539S. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-3 Credits.

Special Topics.

CMSD 540S. PEDIATRIC FEEDING AND SWALLOWING. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
This course is a study of normal and atypical swallowing and feeding in infants and children.

CMSD 542S. INFANT AND TODDLER COMMUNICATION AND LANGUAGE. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
This course provides advanced study in communication and language development and disorders in infants and toddlers by focusing on current theory, assessment and remediation.

CMSD 543S. SCHOOL-AGE AND ADOLESCENT LANGUAGE. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
This course covers the development of language in typically developing and language impaired school aged and adolescent students. Various language disorders are discussed with the implications for assessment and intervention.

CMSD 545S. AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: COMD 542.
This course is an overview and discussion of the characteristics, causes, assessment and intervention for persons with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

CMSD 547S. AUGMENTATIVE COMMUNICATION. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
This course is an in-depth study of the use of augmentative and alternative methods of communication for persons with severe speech and/or language impairments.

CMSD 550S. SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY IN THE SCHOOLS. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of instructor.
This course provides the required credit hours of coursework related to laws, policy and ethical issues involved in providing speech-language therapy and audiology services within the public education setting; helps prepare students for public school practicum; and fulfills partial requirements for educational staff associates (ESA) certification.

CMSD 552S. NEUROPATHOLOGIES OF LANGUAGE. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
This course is an advanced study of the language disorders that occur as a result of insult to the brain after birth, particularly after language acquisition. Emphasis is on aphasia and related disorders.

CMSD 553S. VOICE AND RESONANCE. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
This course provides information regarding the etiology and characteristics of disorders of the laryngeal and resonance systems. Assessment and treatment of loudness, pitch, vocal and resonance problems are presented.

CMSD 554S. MOTOR SPEECH DISORDERS. 3 Credits.

CMSD 555S. BILINGUAL AND CULTURAL ISSUES. 2 Credits.

CMSD 556S. PROBLEMS IN STUTTERING. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
This course is an advanced study of current theories, issues, problems and treatment approaches in the area of stuttering.

CMSD 557S. CLEFT PALATE AND OTHER CRANIO-FACIAL ABNORMALITIES. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
This course examines the etiology and characteristics of cranio-facial anomalies and their effects on communication. Assessment and treatment of the speech problems associated with these disorders are also discussed.

CMSD 559S. DYSPHAGIA. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: COMD 552 strongly recommended.
This course presents the anatomy and physiology of swallowing as well as the evaluation and treatment of swallowing disorders.

CMSD 561S. CLINICAL PRACTICUM. 2-6 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated for credit with permission of instructor up to 8 semester credits.
This course provides students with practical clinical experience working with children and adults who present with various speech, language, hearing and swallowing disorders.

CMSD 562S. ADVANCED CLINICAL PRACTICUM. 2-6 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit; may be repeated for credit with permission of instructor up to 24 quarter credits.
Pre-requisites: permission from off-campus clinical practicum coordinator.
This course is an extension of clinical skills into off-campus practicum sites. Students will apply theoretical concepts to evaluation, treatment planning and therapy services for communicatively handicapped children and adults in community settings.

CMSD 563S. SPECIAL CLINICAL PRACTICUM. 1-2 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated with permission of instructor up to 4 quarter credits.
Preerequisite: COMD 697 or permission of the clinical director. This practicum is designed for post-internship students. It typically involves the assignment of a challenging client and carries an expectation of a high degree of independence in case management.

CMSD 568S. ADVANCED ASSESSMENT: PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
This course is designed to facilitate the ability to gather, analyze and synthesize critical case information and make differential diagnoses of communication disorders. It includes independent problem-solving, development of treatment objectives from data and the writing of clinical reports.

CMSD 596S. EXPERIMENTAL. 1-3 Credits.

Experimental.

CMSD 597S. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-3 Credits.

Notes: only one workshop course for up to 3 credits may be used to fulfill graduate degree requirements.
Workshop

CMSD 598S. SEMINAR. 1-3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
This course provides graduate level instruction in a specific content area in communication disorders utilizing a seminar format.

CMSD 599S. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
This course allows the student to engage in an independent study project in a selected field of communication disorders.

CMSD 600S. THESIS. 1-8 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Under supervision of staff members, the graduate student organizes and formally writes and presents a research project in thesis form.

CMSD 620S. RESEARCH IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS I. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: COMD 520.
This is the first of three courses designed to prepare the student to participate in basic and/or applied research in communication disorders. For this course, students will work with a faculty mentor to further refine the research idea developed in COMD 520. The culmination of this course will be: (1) the initial development of a literature review and methodology and (2) drafting and submission ofIRB forms, as appropriate.

CMSD 621S. RESEARCH IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS II. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: COMD 620.
This is the second of three courses designed to prepare the student to participate in basic and/or applied research in communication disorders. For this course,students will work with a faculty mentor to further refine the research idea developed in COMD 620. The culmination of this course will be a complete and thorough literature review and methodology for the student's proposed research. The initial collection of data may take place under this course.

CMSD 622S. RESEARCH IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS III. 2 Credits.

Notes: this course is repeated in subsequent semesters until the thesis or research project is completed and successfully defended.
Pre-requisites: COMD 621.
This is the third of three courses designed to prepare the student to participate in basic and/or applied research in communication disorders. The culmination of this course will be the collection of data (if applicable) and the development of either a thesis or poster to be defended at the end of the academic term in which this course is taken.

CMSD 696S. COLLEGE TEACHING INTERNSHIP. 1-4 Credits.

Teaching a lower division college course under supervision of a regular faculty member. Includes course planning, arranging bibliographical and other instructional aids, conferences with students, experience in classroom instruction and student and course evaluation.

CMSD 697S. CLINICAL FIELD EXPERIENCE. 1-10 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
This is an internship of one or more semesters of professionally supervised experience in a departmentally approved clinical setting, agency or institution. This course is typically taken as part of the Master of Science program, but can also be taken by individuals engaged in the speech-language pathology clinical fellowship (SLPCF) through the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association when sponsorship is provided by an Eastern Washington University faculty member.