Addiction Studies

This is an archived copy of the 2016-2017 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ewu.edu.

Grace Creasman, Director 
department page
668 N. Riverpoint Blvd. 239
509.828.1437

Jenna Redhawk, Program Coordinator
509.828.1436


Faculty

Grace Creasman, Hayley N. Lake, Allison R. Metzler.



Undergraduate Program

Addiction Studies (ADST) is an approved education provider with NAADAC, The Association for Addiction Professionals. ADST provides university-level education valuable for students in a variety of disciplines such as health education, criminal justice, social work, education, psychology, and other fields of study to enhance the effectiveness of their careers. ADST courses expose students to the multiple demands of working in a treatment agency that can be transferred to other work environments. Employers are especially eager to hire students with a foundation in Addiction Studies coursework as part of their major program.

The main focus of our Interdisciplinary Bachelor of Arts degree is to provide students the educational requirements to prepare them for Washington state certification as Chemical Dependency Professionals. Students who complete all state required courses for certification are eligible to take the NAADAC Exam before completing other state requirements.

Mission Statement

  • Addiction Studies fosters the concept of Transformative Learning following the basic tenet: you cannot change anyone but yourself.
  • Addiction Studies strives to provide opportunities for students to become aware and critical of their own and others’ assumptions and to recognize frames of reference using their sociological imaginations to redefine problems from a different perspective.
  • As we change the way we react and behave in our environments, others around us may also be transformed, thereby enhancing community consciousness.

General Admission Requirements for Addiction Studies

Undergraduate students interested in completing one of our program options can schedule a meeting (either via email or phone) with the director of Addiction Studies. Transfer students from another addiction/chemical dependency program will want to contact the director to evaluate previous coursework for inclusion in the ADST program.

Required courses in the following program of study may have prerequisites. Reference the course description section for clarification.

Graduate Certificates


The Addiction Studies Graduate Certificate is designed for persons who have completed a bachelor or master’s degree with a background in social work or a related field who are interested in obtaining coursework leading to certification as a Chemical Dependency Professional in Washington state.

Students without a background in social work, or related field, may need to complete additional coursework to qualify for Washington state certification.

State Certification as a Chemical Dependency Professional in Washington also requires:

  • students applying with a BA degree 2000 hours in a state approved addiction treatment agency
  • students applying with a Master’s degree 1500 hours in a state approved addiction treatment agency
  • students will need to take and pass the NAADAC, NCC AP Level II Exam.
  • students completing the ADST certificate courses are eligible to take the NCC AP Level II exam. Contact ADST for more information.

Students from other states may need to check with their local certification boards to be sure this program will meet their state requirements.

In an effort to accommodate students from across Washington state or other states all courses are taught online. Addiction Studies faculty and staff are available for personal academic advising for prospective and current student needs.

A practicum option is available for students but is not required for the certificate.

Optional Practicum

ADST 595 and ADST 695

Students who are not currently working in a treatment agency may benefit from the practicum experience. Practicum hours may count toward Washington state certification required hours.

Admission Requirements

Completion of a bachelor’s or master’s degree with a cumulative GPA ≥3.0.

Prerequisite

Students pursuing Washington state certification as Chemical Dependency Professionals may need to take additional coursework to qualify for licensure. Washington state requires students to have 45 quarter or 60 semester credits in addiction related coursework to cover required competencies. ADST provides the bulk of those competencies in the Graduate Certificate as many times students have taken other courses to cover the additional requirements. 

Additional requirements may include, ADST 505, ADST 502, and ADST 303 covering Brief Risk Intervention. A course in Human Development, Developmental Models and Theories or Lifespan Development is also required. 

Note: student transcripts are evaluated to determine if these additional course competencies are covered in previous coursework.

Program Requirements

Meet Graduate Studies admission requirements , consult with ADST director or advisor to discuss program requirements, contact Addiction Studies at 509.828.1436 for further information.


Addiction Studies Courses


ADST 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

ADST 300. SURVEY OF ALCOHOL/DRUG PROBLEMS. 4 Credits.

Students will learn international and current definitions of alcohol and drug use, abuse and addiction. Recognition of misuse as a social problem and the evolution of social policy and attitudes. Socio-cultural and cross-cultural aspects of chemical dependency, including vulnerable populations—women, youth, elderly and ethnic-cultural groups. Identification and progression of symptoms and disease including the impact on individuals, family and society. Special focus on addressing drug problems personally and professionally with an overview of contemporary treatment modalities.

ADST 302. COUNSELING THEORIES FOR THE ADDICTION PROFESSIONAL. 4 Credits.

Students study the principal theories and techniques of therapeutic and counseling relationships with particular focus on those designed for or adept in addressing defense mechanisms and resistance characteristic of addiction.

ADST 303. HIV/AIDS AND ADDICTION TREATMENT. 2 Credits.

This course presents the study of the impact of air- and blood-borne pathogens and the role of the human service clinician. Students will review the theory and technique for effectively addressing issues of alcohol and drug use for the at-risk person and the issues of risk of exposure for the drug abusing individual. Physiology, epidemiology, risk assessment, legal/ethical issues and societal implications of HIV and other pathogens will be presented. This course is appropriate for students of any discipline but is approved by the DSHS/DASA for state chemical dependency counselor qualification.

ADST 304. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADDICTION. 3 Credits.

This course develops knowledge and functional understanding of the psychology of addiction as supported by the most recent professional theories being presented to date. The concepts of the destructive behaviors associated with addictions of all types are explored. Some to be included will be chemicals, gambling, food, sex, relationship, work, and exercise. This course will explore the ideas of causality and social implication in addictions. The history of our nation in regards to addictions is also a topic of discussion. The various approaches to treatment, alternatives, and social issues are investigated.

ADST 308. CULTURAL ISSUES IN ADDICTION TREATMENT AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
Students examine issues regarding the treatment of persons from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds –persons with disabilities (physical, cognitive), GLBTQ individuals, women and the elderly– by the mainstream culture of the U.S. in health care, addiction treatment, educational settings and other social venues.

ADST 310. GLOBALLY SPEAKING: WHAT ABOUT DRUGS?. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
This course explores complex global issues of drugs, where illegal drugs come from, who is producing and/or selling these drugs and who is buying them. Also, the course compares the drug policies of other countries and some experiences countries outside the United States are having with drug legalization.

ADST 350. ADDICTION STUDIES PRACTICUM SEMINAR. 1 Credit.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
Pre-requisites: ADST 308 and ADST 412 or permission of instructor.
This course prepares students to enter into the ADST practicum experience. Students make application to practicum, obtain proper state-required paperwork and review practicum assignment.

ADST 385. ADDICTION STUDIES PRACTICUM I. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: successful completion of or currently enrolled in ADST 350 or permission of instructor.
Students will obtain an opportunity to integrate and develop their knowledge and skills in an appropriate and relevant setting that will assist in their development as addiction treatment or prevention professionals.

ADST 395. INTERNSHIP. 1-3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Placement in an alcohol/drug prevention or treatment facility to observe and study the application of theory and technique toward generalization to the student's principal discipline. When the field experience placement is in a state certified alcohol/drug treatment facility, the hours apply toward chemical dependency counselor state certification.

ADST 397. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

ADST 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Subjects vary relative to faculty and student interests.

ADST 410. COMMUNITY PREVENTION METHODS. 4 Credits.

This course explores the role the media plays in prevention, such as media advocacy, media literacy, social marketing and social norms marketing. This course will also discuss the requirements for prevention credentialing in Washington state.

ADST 412. PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY OF ADDICTIONS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ADST 308 or permission of instructor.
This course covers information on the physical impact and the response of the human body to alcohol, psychoactive substances and addictive behaviors through the study of fundamentals of pharmacokinetics, neurological functions and current research findings. Concepts and terminology essential for working on a professional addiction treatment team and for communicating with patients and families are covered. There is special focus on effective intervention strategies for each class of drug and for working with a variety of addictive behaviors.

ADST 420. ALCOHOL/DRUG CASE MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: completion of ADST 302 and ADST 308 or permission of the instructor.
This course builds on the theoretical and technical principles and skills addressed in ADST 302. Thorough review of approaches and philosophies of case management and its essential role in effectively addressing the complexity of multiple-issue recovery, including dual-diagnosis, gender and sexuality issues, suicide and relapse. Includes established national and regional standards of care in treatment planning, record keeping and discharged and aftercare planning.

ADST 430. ADDICTION TREATMENT WITH FAMILIES. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ADST 308 or permission of instructor.
This course examines the dynamics of family in relationship to chemical dependency and models of family counseling, including overviews of structural, strategic, transgenerational, growth-oriented, behavioral and solution-focused theories as applied to chemical dependency.

ADST 440. ALCOHOL/DRUG GROUP COUNSELING. 3 Credits.

WINTER/SPRING Students will review the theoretical foundations of group dynamics and therapy as applied to alcohol/drug treatment clientele. They will explore the design, leadership and applications of therapy groups via a combination of lecture readings and experimental lab activities. Emphasis will be placed on learning to observe, understand and guide the group dynamics as they occur.

ADST 442. SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT FOR CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ADST 308.
This course is designed to assist social work, mental health counseling students and chemical dependency professional trainees (students) in obtaining the skills needed to conduct an accurate substance abuse assessment/evaluation and to determine the appropriate level of treatment by understanding accepted criteria for diagnosis by understanding placement criteria (ASAM), utilizing assessment instruments, analyzing and interpreting data, documenting assessment findings and making appropriate treatment recommendations.

ADST 444. TREATING CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS. 4 Credits.

This class will establish a better understanding of the inherent complexities of co-occurring disorders (COD) and develop a variety of clinical skills necessary in the treatment of COD. We will explore the principles of cognitive-behavioral therapy, solution-focused therapy, motivational enhancement therapy and brief therapy approaches to both substance abuse and mental illness. Selected clinical interventions from each of these evidence-based treatment modalities will be taught and practiced for both group work and individual therapy. Clinical approaches, treatment planning, placement and medications used to treat COD will also be discussed.

ADST 446. BEST PRACTICES IN SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND MENTAL HEATLH INTERVENTION. 4 Credits.

Motivational interviewing (MI) is an effective evidence-based approach to overcoming the factors that keep people from making desired changes in their lives, even after seeking or being referred to professional treatment. The first half of this course reviews the conceptual and research background supporting MI and the Transtheoretical model-stages of change (SOC) and provides practice in implementing the skills involved in their approaches. The second half of this course will be an overview of dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) and how it can be applied when working with chemically dependent clients. Each of the four skill modules will be covered. Students will also become familiar with techniques such as commitment strategies, diary cards and coaching.

ADST 452. TOPICS IN CONTINUING EDUCATION. 1 Credit.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
These courses are designed to teach behavioral health, chemical dependency, and healthcare providers with legal responsibilities for the assessment, management and care of consumers/patients.

ADST 460. LAW AND ETHICS FOR ADDICTION PROFESSIONALS. 4 Credits.

Students will be exposed to fundamental and technical study of the law, policy, malpractice and liability regarding chemical dependency prevention and treatment practice. Strong focus will be on the contemporary issues of the field relative to current policy and the development of professional knowledge and skills that support ethical and effective practice.

ADST 462. ADOLESCENT ADDICTION ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ADST 308 or permission of instructor.
This course emphasizes the unique developmental stages of adolescence and ways in which substance use/abuse/dependency harm the adolescent’s worldview. Various methods used when providing interventions and treatment are explored along with assessment requirements specified by the state. This course expands the issues of the family system as context for recovery using traditional resources and innovative approaches in adolescent chemical dependency treatments.

ADST 464. RELAPSE PREVENTION. 2 Credits.

Prevention Relapse is not a single event, but is a process that takes place over time. This class will investigate that process by examining the principles and procedures of relapse prevention therapy. It will also focus on the developmental model of recovery to explore major causes of relapse in each stage of recovery. Another major focus of this class will be to address client relationship with family, employment, education, spirituality, health concerns, and legal needs.

ADST 480. WHERE SUICIDE AND MENTAL HEALTH MEET. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ADST 308 or permission of instructor.
Students explore the connection between mental health diagnosis and suicide risk. They analyze case exercises that include therapeutic interventions, initial treatment planning, coordination of services and referral.

ADST 482. SUICIDE ASSESSMENT, TREATMENT AND MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Students will evaluate the theoretical foundation in the clinical treatment and management of suicidal risk over time through case management of suicidal persons. Students will compare and assess “evidenced-based” and “best practices” approaches for the treatment and case management of the suicidal person within their scope of practice. Through role play exercises that include therapeutic interventions, initial treatment planning, coordination of services and referral, students will demonstrate these intervention skills, including aftercare intervention (postvention) with families, to evaluate effectiveness.

ADST 484. SUICIDE PREVENTION. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ADST 300.
Students examine a brief history of suicidal beliefs and explore present-day suicidal issues that are considered a public health problem. The goals, objectives and strategies of the Surgeon General’s National Strategy for Suicide Prevention and the public health model are discussed in an effort to provide students with tools to examine current programs, media literacy, barriers treatment and research, and cultural & social factors of suicide prevention.

ADST 485. ADDICTION STUDIES PRACTICUM II. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ADST 350 or permission of instructor.
Students will build on experience and strengths developed in Practicum I to prepare them to work independently in the addiction or prevention field.

ADST 490. ADST SENIOR CAPSTONE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing and declared major in Interdisciplinary Studies Addiction Studies or permission of program director.
Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
This course covers the eight Practice Dimensions and Transdisciplinary Foundation knowledge that is the ideal standard the addiction counselor strives to master. Students who plan to move forward with WA state licensure as Chemical Dependency Professionals gain a cumulative summary of the above practice dimension skills, knowledge and attitudes that accomplished counselors strive to master. For the final project students have the opportunity to take a practice examination that mimics the NAADAC required exam for Level II counselors.

ADST 495. INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Placement in an alcohol/drug prevention or treatment facility which supports the opportunity to learn knowledge and skill by providing direct service. Regular seminars are held for processing and integrating concepts and techniques and addressing professional issues. When the practicum placement is in a state certified alcohol/drug treatment facility, the hours apply toward chemical dependency counselor qualification.

ADST 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

ADST 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-4 Credits.

Subjects vary according to faculty and student interest.

ADST 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

ADST 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

ADST 501. RELAPSE PREVENTION. 2 Credits.

Relapse is not a single event but a process that takes place over time. This class will investigate that process by examining the principles and procedures of relapse prevention therapy. It will also focus on the developmental model of recovery to explore major causes of relapse in each stage of recovery. Another major focus of this class will be to address client relationship with family, employment, education, spirituality, health concerns and legal needs.

ADST 502. COUNSELING THEORIES FOR ADDICTION PROFESSIONALS. 2 Credits.

This course is intended to provide students with specific counseling theory information necessary to meet state requirements for Chemical Dependency Professional certification.

ADST 504. ADOLESCENT ADDICTION ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT. 4 Credits.

This course will emphasize the unique developmental stages of adolescence and the ways in which substance use/abuse/dependency harm the adolescent’s worldview. The various methods used when providing interventions and treatment will be explored along with assessment requirements specified by the state. This course will expand the issues of the family system as context for recovery using traditional resources and innovative approaches in adolescent chemical dependency treatments.

ADST 505. ADDICTION GROUP COUNSELING. 2 Credits.

Notes: taught online.
Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
Theoretical foundations of group dynamics and counseling as applied to addiction treatment clientele. Explore the design, leadership and applications of group counseling via a combination of readings, video presentations, case studies and class discussions. Emphasis on learning to observe, understand, guide and facilitate the group dynamics as they occur.

ADST 512. PHARMACOLOGICAL ACTIONS OF ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUGS. 4 Credits.

Students will review the physical impact and the response of the human body to alcohol and other drugs of abuse through study of the fundamentals of pharmacokinetics, neurologic functioning and current research findings. They will also learn concepts and terminology essential for working on a professional treatment team and for communicating with patients and families. There will be special focus on effective intervention strategies for each class of drug.

ADST 520. CASE MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

This course provides a thorough review of approaches and philosophies of case management and its essential role in effectively addressing the complexity of multiple-issue recovery, including dual-diagnosis, gender and sexuality issues, suicide and relapse. Includes established national and regional standards of care in treatment planning, record keeping and discharged and aftercare planning.

ADST 530. ADDICTION TREATMENT WITH FAMILIES AND DIVERSE POPULATIONS. 4 Credits.

This course uses the Addiction Counseling Competencies to explore the complex issues of family in relation to addiction and models of family counseling. Additionally, this class will include information on diverse cultures, to incorporate the relevant needs of culturally diverse groups, as well as people with disabilities, into clinical practice.

ADST 535. LAW AND ETHICS FOR ADDICTION PROFESSIONALS. 4 Credits.

Students will be exposed to fundamental and technical study of the law, policy, malpractice and liability regarding chemical dependency prevention and treatment practice. Strong focus will be on the contemporary issues of the field relative to current policy and the development of professional knowledge and skills that support ethical and effective practice. Application of ethics for chemical dependency clinicians.

ADST 542. SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT OF CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS. 4 Credits.

This course is designed to assist the Master-level Social Worker, mental health counseling student adn chemical Dependency Professional Trainees (students) in ovtaining the necessary skills needed to conduct an accurate substance abuse assessment/evaluation and determine appropriate level of teatment. Further, the student will gain an understanding of mental health diagnosis utilizing screening, assessment and diagnostic tool. Students will explore specific skills such as building rapport, gathering data, determining the client's readiness for change, understanding accepted criteria for diagnosis (DSM IVTR), understanding placement criteria (ASAM), utilizing assessment instruments, analyzing and interpreting data documenting assessment findings and making appropriate treatment recommendations.

ADST 544. TREATING CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS. 4 Credits.

This class will establish a better understanding of the inherent complexities of co-occurring disorders (COD) and develop a variety of clinical skills necessary in the treatment of COD. We will explore the principles of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Solution-Focused Therapy, Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Brief Therapy approaches to both substance abuse and Mental Illness selected clinical interventions from each of these evidenced-based treatment modalities will be taught and practiced for both group work and individual therapy. Clinical approaches, treatment planning, placement and medications used to treat COD will also be discussed.

ADST 546. BEST PRACTICE INTERVENTION. 4 Credits.

Motivational interviewing (MI) is an effective evidence-based approach to overcoming the factors that keep people from making desired changes in their lives, even after seeking or being referred to professional treatment. The first half of this course reviews the conceptual and research background supporting MI and the transtheoretical model-stages of change (SOC) and provides practice in implementing the skills involved in their approaches. The second half of this course will be an overview of dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) and how it can be applied when working with chemically dependent clients. Each of the four skill modules will be covered. Students will also become familiar with techniques such as commitment strategies, diary cards and coaching.

ADST 561. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-4 Credits.

Various topics of concern to addiction professionals in the field of addiction treatment and prevention will be presented to educate students about emerging or recurring issues and concerns.

ADST 562. SUICIDE ASSESSMENT, TREATMENT AND MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: SOWK 562.
Pre-requisites: graduate standing.
This course explores the theoretical foundation in the clinical assessment, treatment and management of suicidal risk over time through case management with suicidal persons. Additionally, we will review instructions in “evidenced-based” and “best practices” for the treatment and case management with the suicidal person within the scope of practice. We also have role play exercises that include therapeutic interventions, initial treatment planning including case notes, coordination of services and referral.

ADST 595. ALCOHOL/DRUG PRACTICUM I. 1-4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Individual learning and career development course with placement in an alcohol/drug treatment or prevention facility coordinated through the Addiction Studies Program.

ADST 596. EXPERIMENTAL. 1-5 Credits.

ADST 695. ALCOHOL/DRUG PRACTICUM II. 1-4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Individual learning and career development course with placement in an alcohol/drug treatment or prevention facility. Placement in an alcohol/drug treatment or prevention facility supports the opportunity to learn knowledge and skills by providing direct service with agency supervision. Regular seminars are held for processing and integrating concepts and techniques and addressing professional issues. When practicum placement is in a state certified alcohol/drug treatment facility, the hours may also apply toward chemical dependency counselor state certification.