Anthropology

This is an archived copy of the 2016-2017 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ewu.edu.

Rob Sauders, Chair
department page
103 Isle Hall
509.359.2433


Faculty

John T. Dorwin, Jerry R. Galm, Kassahun Kebede, Sarah A. C. Keller, Robert R. Quinn, Robert R. Sauders, Julia E. Smith, Lauren A. Stachowiak, Stacy Warren, Michael L. Zukosky.


Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Undergraduate Minors


Undergraduate Programs

The Department of Geography and Anthropology offers both a major and a minor in anthropology. Anthropology offers students the opportunity to broaden their exposure to peoples and cultures of the world, both now and in the past. The four-field approach considers the biological, cultural, prehistoric/historic and linguistic aspects of the human condition. Specifically, the Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology is designed to meet the needs of students who want to:

  1. broaden their undergraduate exposure to other peoples and cultures of the world as a part of their general education;
  2. prepare for graduate studies in Anthropology; or
  3. undertake an undergraduate program leading to work in such fields as social work, law and forensics, as well as business and other occupations interacting with ethnically diverse populations or international agencies and companies.

The department also has a research unit, Archaeological and Historical Services, where students can volunteer and some internships may be arranged both with AHS and other entities. The department has a number of physical facilities available for student use, including a physical anthropology laboratory, a cartography laboratory, a GIS laboratory and a map library.

Optional Requirements for Anthropology

Anthropology students who plan to become candidates for advanced degrees are advised to complete two years of a foreign language and a course in statistics.

Required courses in the following programs of study may have prerequisites. Reference the course description section for clarification.


Anthropology Courses


ANTH 101. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: the GECR for social sciences, list 2,anthropology, geography, psychology and sociology.
An introduction to the study of man with principal emphasis on culture.

ANTH 161. INTRODUCTION TO CHICANO CULTURE. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: CHST 101.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
A study of Chicano culture providing an initial overview of its roots and conflicts. Specific components discussed are cultural identity, customs, language, psychology and the arts.

ANTH 195. INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

ANTH 197. FRESHMAN SEMINAR. 2 Credits.

ANTH 201. LATINAS/OS IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN SOCIETY. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: CHST 201.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
The following course examines the experience of the other Latinos (Hispanics) in the United States: Puerto Rican, Cuban American and Central Americans. The course presents a brief historical overview of their entrance in American society and a demographic comparison of significant socio-economic variables of the groups. The primary focus of the course is to examine the social and cultural profile of the Puerto Rican, Cuban and Central American groups in the U.S. The course covers historical, social and cultural themes, which include the impact of American institutions on identity, culture, language, the family and the future implications of immigration from Latin America.

ANTH 202. HUMAN EVOLUTION. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a GECR for natural science–anthropology.
This course examines the biological process of evolution as it applies to humans and their recent ancestors; it does not debate the existence of evolutionary processes. Students learn about major events in human evolution and key fossil evidence that reflects them, including the development of bipedalism, increase in size and complexity of the human brain,increasing use of cultural solutions to respond to biological pressures, and nature and extent of ongoing human microevolution.

ANTH 203. PHILOSOPHY OF CULTURE. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a GECR for humanities and fine arts, List 3, philosophy and reasoning.
This course approaches culture as a contestable set of practices, relationships and beliefs and look at them from a variety of philosophical perspectives. A major goal of the course is for students to learn to critical reflect on their everyday lives and gain new perspectives on how they think, interact with others and work. A secondary goal is for students to gain a better understanding of the importance "of philosophy for social theory."

ANTH 204. ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a GECR for natural science–anthropology.
Archaeology provides a useful case study for the practical application of natural science knowledge in support of the needs of disciplines both within and without the broader natural sciences. Students explore the archaeological sciences of remote sensing and probabilistic surveying, radiometric and isotope dating, fauna/floral analysis, climate reconstruction and change, reconstruction of subsistence patterns and population health, mortality and movements among others.

ANTH 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

ANTH 299. SPECIAL STUDIES. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

ANTH 301. PRINCIPLES OF ARCHAEOLOGY. 5 Credits.

A comprehensive survey of the field of archaeology which will introduce students to the methods of field excavation and reconstruction employed by scientific archaeologists in the reconstruction of prehistoric cultures.

ANTH 302. VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: sophomore standing.
The varied forms of communication are an essential aspect of human diversisty. This course explores ethnographically how visual forms–from traditional ritual and performance to modern television and industrial design–communicate sociocultural ideas and practices.

ANTH 310. SILK ROAD AND CENTRAL ASIA. 3 Credits.

An ethnographic survey of societies in the Eurasian region including Russia, Mongolia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and China, emphasizing post-socialist development.

ANTH 320. MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY AND CULTURE. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: GEOG 320, HIST 320.
Examines the various ethnic, religious and national communities of the Middle East in historical and contemporary context.

ANTH 336. GEOGRAPHIES OF CONFLICT IN THE MIDDLE EAST. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: GEOG 336/HIST 336.
Examines the Middle East and its various ethnic, political, economic, religious and environmental conflicts from a geographic perspective. The course’s holistic combination of geographic and anthropological inquiry will offer insights into how the natural environment and built environment interact and engage with the cultural and political landscapes of the Middle East.

ANTH 342. TRIBES, BANDS AND CHIEFDOMS. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: HONS 342.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
Approaches to understanding non-state societies and an examination of how their cultures contrast with each other and with our own way of life.

ANTH 345. PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 5 Credits.

An introduction to the origin, genetic adaptation, and evolution of living and extinct humans.

ANTH 347. PEOPLES OF AFRICA. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: AAST 347.
A comparative view of tradition and change in sub-Saharan Africa.

ANTH 348. PEASANT SOCIETIES. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
World survey of what it means to be a peasant; relationship between communities and larger political wholes; revolutionary and protest movements and their future prospects.

ANTH 349. MAJOR CIVLIZATIONS OF ASIA. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: HONS 349.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
An ethnographic survey of Japan, China, Islam and India, emphasizing the core values of each.

ANTH 355. INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: HONS 355.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
A comparative overview of distinctive Indian cultures. Opportunities for individual research provided.

ANTH 356. ARCHAEOLOGY OF NORTH AMERICA. 5 Credits.

The pre-Columbian history of America north of the Valley of Mexico.

ANTH 357. PEOPLES OF LATIN AMERICA. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: HONS 357.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
An ethnographic survey of contemporary cultures of Central and South America, including both aboriginal and peasant societies. Emphasis is placed on the merging and clashing of European, Indian and African, rich and poor and the continuing character of these conflicts into the present.

ANTH 358. MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: HONS 358.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
This course offers an understanding of the anthropology of medicine, curing versus healing, the concept of biomedicine and its role in today’s world and other perspectives on medicine and medical practice. A review of folk and professional medical systems will be included.

ANTH 366. REVOLUTIONS AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE THIRD WORLD. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: HONS 366.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
This course explores the alternative models available for understanding rapid cultural change in a worldwide array of postcolonial countries. Emphasis is placed on the historical origins of ethnic, nationalist and class conflict in local regions as studied by anthropologists. Opportunities are made available for pursuing students’ regional interests.

ANTH 375. ANTHROPOLOGY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 5 Credits.

This course offers an ethnographic understanding of the culture of scientific practice and technology. Case studies explore culture within the context of the medical and natural sciences, biotechnology and virtual worlds, both in the U.S. and abroad.

ANTH 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

ANTH 397. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

ANTH 398. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

ANTH 399. SPECIAL STUDIES. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor and the department chair and college dean.

ANTH 401. ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS. 5 Credits.

A review of anthropological methods for the collection and analysis of cultural data.

ANTH 405. CRITICAL ANALYSIS IN ANTHROPOLOGY. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ANTH 101 and ENGL 201.
This course focuses on practicing and improving critical analytical skills through the study and discussion of various genres of anthropological literature and through guided writing assignments.

ANTH 432. ANTHROPOLOGY OF GENDER. 4 Credits.

Cross listed: WMST 432.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
This course examines notions of sex and gender from a cross-cultural perspective. Material covered includes understandings of gender, third genders, human sexuality and the gendered nature of activities in both non-Western and Western societies.

ANTH 434. AID AND DEVELOPMENT. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: choose one of the following–ANTH 101, ANTH 348, ANTH 366 or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to problematize understandings of poverty, aid and development by examining the intersection of the global free market economies with those communities historically referred to in the literature as ‘poor.’ Students explore how aid and development has been marshaled to alleviate or eliminate economic poverty and structural inequality.

ANTH 435. IRISH HISTORY AND CULTURE. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: HIST 435.
This course examines various aspects of Irish history and culture from prehistory to the present. Attention is given to religious, social, cultural, economic and political institutions and developments.

ANTH 436. POLITICS OF CULTURE: ISRAEL AND PALESTINE. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: GEOG 436/HIST 436.
Examines the role of culture in the political struggles between Israelis and Palestinians. Explores the influence of national, religious, ethnic and historical narratives in the conceptualization of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. This course will consider how a detailed knowledge of these ‘politics of culture’ can provide meaningful insights to potential avenues of cultural reconciliation and, ultimately, a more peaceful environment for Israelis and Palestinians.

ANTH 437. WOMAN AND ISLAM. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: GEOG 437/HIST 437/WMST 437.
Pre-requisites: junior or senior standing.
This course examines the status and identity of women in Islamic communities throughout the world and assesses how different interpretations of Islam, as a simultaneous religious, social, cultural, political and economic system, influences perceptions of women within Islamic communities. It further considers the perceptions of Islam vis-à-vis women and Islamic women themselves by non-Muslim communities.

ANTH 438. PEACE, VIOLENCE AND CULTURE. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: GEOG 438/HIST 438.
Pre-requisites: junior or senior standing.
This course is a collective exercise in critical thinking on the intersection and interaction of peace, violence and culture. It explores the cultural dimensions of peace and violence, including the role of culture in defining and understanding the manifestation and enactment of peace and violence both by and against individuals as well as groups.

ANTH 439. TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY. 1-5 Credits.

This course is a variable topics course exploring current interests and specific research foci in each of the four sub-fields of anthropology. Topics might include anthropological perspectives on contemporary issues; current research interests of specific faculty; further investigation of sub-topics included in large survey courses.

ANTH 444. DEVELOPMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ANTH 101.
Introduction to the development of theoretical anthropology which surveys alternative theories concerning man and culture.

ANTH 445. ANTHROPOLOGICAL LINGUISTICS. 5 Credits.

An anthropological perspective on language, incorporating an examination of contemporary approaches to phonology and syntax with an emphasis on language in culture.

ANTH 446. SOCIOLINGUISTICS. 3 Credits.

The course deals with language in its social setting. It examines linguistic variation in relation to social status and interactional context. The political implications of linguistic variation are also considered.

ANTH 448. ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD AND NUTRITION. 5 Credits.

This course explores the diversity of human foodways and their ecological, cultural and social significance.

ANTH 450. CULTURAL ECOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: HONS 450.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
The relationship between man, nature and culture is contrasted in food collecting, simple farming and technologically more complex cultures.

ANTH 452. ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD TECHNIQUES. 5 Credits.

Archaeological theory and method with emphasis on excavation procedures and skills and laboratory analysis. Opportunity for limited field experience.

ANTH 454. MYTH, MAGIC AND RITUAL. 5 Credits.

Cross listed: HONS 454.
This course explores myth, magic and ritual as they relate to religion, philosophy and science, both in western and non-western, urban and non-urban contexts.

ANTH 455. ARCHAEOLOGY OF MESO-AMERICA. 5 Credits.

The pre-Columbian history of Mexico, Central America, and Western South America.

ANTH 456. WORLD ARCHAEOLOGY. 5 Credits.

This course provides a global review of archaeology beginning with the appearance of the first hominids (the Australopithecines) through the beginnings of agriculture and the advent of social stratification and culturally complex civilizations. Topics will include an overview of human evolution, the first humans and their hunting-gathering lifestyles, the increasing specialization of hunter-gatherers and the dawn of horticulture-agriculture.

ANTH 457. WITCHCRFT, SORCERY AND SHAMANISM. 5 Credits.

An anthropological study of the cultural significance of witchcraft, sorcery, spirit possession, and shamanism.

ANTH 458. FAIR TRADE, COFFEE AND SOCIAL JUSTICE. 2 Credits.

Cross listed: HONS 458.
This class explores the Fair Trade movement, using coffee as a lens. Topics include how the Fair Trade system has worked, debate over the Fair Trade system as a social movement and an alternative market.

ANTH 459. ARCHAEOLOGICAL LAB ANALYSIS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: choose one of the following– ANTH 301, ANTH 452, ANTH 524 or permission of the instructor.
This archaeological laboratory course provides students with a foundation in post-excavation analysis. The course broadly covers various analytical methodologies, with particular attention to regional assemblages housed at Eastern Washington University. Students are provided with an opportunity to gain experience in different analysis techniques used to study an assemblage after it is brought in from the field and incorporate that data into a discussion of larger archaeological and anthropological issues.

ANTH 460. FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: restricted to students majoring in Anthropology, Criminal Justice or Chemistry with Forensic Science option, or permission of instructor.
This course is an overview of osteology, human taphonomy and personal identification from skeletal remains, particularly as they are applicable to law enforcement situations. Most class periods will be a combination of lecture and laboratory work.

ANTH 462. ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: choose one of the following–ANTH 101, ECON 100, ECON 200, ECON 201 or permission of the instructor.
This course examines the economic behavior of people around the world, paying particular attention to the different systems of production, consumption and exchange that operate throughout the world. The goal of the course is to situate the study of markets, commodities and money into a larger cross-cultural context by exploring relations of power, kinship, gender, exchange and social transformation.

ANTH 463. COMMUNITY PROJECTS. 5 Credits.

In this course students will learn methodologies and techniques used in applied anthropology. They will then put their anthropological knowledge and field techniques to use in applied anthropology projects in the community.

ANTH 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE. 4 Credits.

Satisfies: senior capstone university graduation requirement.
This course joins together the diverse sub-fields and eclectic viewpoints of anthropology and its supporting disciplines with the aim of clarifying anthropology’s practical uses. It seeks the principles and applications which the field as a whole needs in order to communicate with other institutions and with society at large. We explore the implicit social criticism anthropology offers to western culture and to its own place within it. The course presents an array of career possibilities, together with a wide range of practical applications for anthropological knowledge. Guest lectures, discussion, group work and their own presentations challenge students to relate their special interests to the larger issues of the human sciences and their meanings for people.

ANTH 493. PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: senior standing.
Advised by a member of the Anthropology faculty, the student compiles an assessment portfolio of academic assignments completed in anthropology courses at EWU. Taken during the term in which the student expects to complete the requirements for the bachelor’s degree in anthropology, this independent study course provides the student with an opportunity to undertake guided academic/career planning as well as to participate in summative assessments.

ANTH 495. INTERNSHIP. 1-15 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

ANTH 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

ANTH 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Special short-term programs of varying content, usually involving field work problems.

ANTH 498. DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Selected topics in anthropology.

ANTH 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Independent study in selected areas of anthropology.

ANTH 501. SEMINAR IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 4 Credits.

This course explores the intersection and interaction of archaeological and physical anthropology and clarifies how synthesizing the unique elements within each subfield enable improved practice in applied anthropology. The course will address the current state of each subfield within applied anthropology and connect this to the more traditional academic body of work in anthropology.

ANTH 502. SEMINAR IN LINGUISTIC AND CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 4 Credits.

This course explores the intersection and interaction of archaeological and physical anthropology and clarifies how synthesizing the unique elements within each subfield enable improved practice in applied anthropology. The course will address the current state of each subfield within applied anthropology and connect this to the more traditional academic body of work in anthropology.

ANTH 510. THEORIES OF APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Applied anthropology is the use of anthropological perspectives, values, data, theories, methods, techniques, and skills for practical purposes. Anthropology has become an essential working tool in many contexts from the environment and human health to economic development and heritage management. This course is an introduction to the way that explanations of Applied Anthropology have emerged from the tradition of anthropological theory. It examines the theoretical frameworks of the discipline, particularly in the way that those frameworks have inspired anthropologists to apply disciplinary explanations and methods to social needs and problems.

ANTH 522. RESEARCH DESIGN. 3 Credits.

Cross listed: GEOG 522.
Provides for the continued development of a practical toolkit with which to conduct applied social science research. Addresses research design elements necessary in areas such needs assessments and program evaluations through techniques such as participatory research, action research, evaluation, assessment and surveying. The course covers development of research proposals for independent, grant funded or contract designs.

ANTH 523. RESEARCH METHODS IN APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY. 5 Credits.

This class helps students build a toolkit with which to conduct applied anthropological research. Specifically, the course endeavors to prepare students to become comfortable with the language of applied anthropology in terms of research objectives (needs assessments, program evaluations, etc.) and techniques like rapid appraisals, participatory research and action research. Students will practice the most important anthropological research methods, including participant observation, structured and unstructured interviews, and archival research, in order to be prepared for future independent research projects.

ANTH 524. ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD SCHOOL. 5-10 Credits.

This course offers students hand-on experience in archaeological excavation techniques and methods through a formal field school setting. Over the course of several weeks, students will gain practical experience in field survey, excavation, stratigraphic interpretation, data collection and management and associated archaeological field skills. Depending on the nature of the site and excavations scheduled for a particular year, students may have opportunities for limited archaeological laboratory analysis and visitation to other local archaeological sites.

ANTH 525. DATA ANALYSIS AND VISUALIZATION. 3 Credits.

Cross listed: GEOG 525.
Pre-requisites: ANTH 522 or GEOG 522.
This course introduces students to data analysis and data visualization. In particular, students will learn basic data analysis approaches, explore their use and apply them to qualitative and quantitative data sets. In addition students will synthesize the results of their data analysis into a variety of data visualization formats.

ANTH 530. FIELD RESEARCH: LAWS AND ETHICS. 2 Credits.

This course includes topics such as establishing rapport with individuals and communities, the ethical dilemmas faced in fieldwork, professional conduct, legal obligations of practicing anthropologists and conflict management that are the sort of skills and tools necessary for the day-to-day practice of applied anthropology. The Field Preparation Seminar provides students a foundation for coursework such as Community Engagement and Community Projects as well as for future anthropological fieldwork.

ANTH 531. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT I. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ANTH 530.
First of two courses dedicated to a case study approach of examining ways of engaging community issues through applied anthropology. Explores problems and problem-solving as defined by anthropologists, leaders and community members themselves, and place them into different theoretical, methodological and programmatic frameworks. Ultimately, considers how faculty, graduate students and community members might work together to identify and analyze community problems as well as develop solutions to those problems.

ANTH 532. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT II. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ANTH 530 and ANTH 531.
Second of two courses dedicated to a case study approach of examining ways of engaging community issues through applied anthropology. Specifically, this course examines secondary forms of social organization including health care and education as well as at the neighborhood level. The course continues to examine problems and problem-solving in local social organization as defined by local people themselves, and place them into different theoretical and methodological frameworks.

ANTH 540. COMMUNITY PROJECTS I. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ANTH 522, ANTH 523, ANTH 530.
This course is designed to provide students with a framework through which to engage issues of important to a local community through the context of applied anthropology under the mentorship of faculty. Students will identify the particular issue and community that their work will engage and connect these to their particular subfield of applied anthropology. In this course, students will focus on 1) establishing a grounded, needs-based thesis research topic; 2) building community rapport to facilitate community-based research; and 3) engaging in participatory observation of the research topic in the local community.

ANTH 541. COMMUNITY PROJECTS II. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ANTH 540, ANTH 525.
This course is designed to provide students with a framework through which to engage issues of importance to a local community through the context of applied anthropology under the mentorship of faculty. Building on the work begun in ANTH 540, students will continue their community-based research while focusing on 1. data collection; 2. data management; and 3. data validation.

ANTH 542. COMMUNITY PROJECTS III. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ANTH 525, ANTH 540, ANTH 541.
This course is designed to provide students with a framework through which to engage issues of importance to a local community through the context of applied anthropology under the mentorship of faculty. Building on the work begun in ANTH 540 and ANTH 541, students will continue their community-based research while focusing on 1) data analysis; 2) data visualization; and 3) presentation of results.

ANTH 562. ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: choose one of the following–ANTH 101, ECON 100, ECON 200, ECON 201 or permission of the instructor.
This course examines the economic behavior of people around the world, paying particular attention to the different systems of production, consumption and exchange that operate throughout the world. The goal of the course is to situate the study of markets, commodities and money into a larger cross-cultural context by exploring relations of power, kinship, gender, exchange and social transformation.

ANTH 595. INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
This course will offer vocational experience for students in the Interdisciplinary option within the History MA program. Placement of the student with Federal or State agencies, or private organizations is designed to provide on-the-job training and will be designed for the individual needs of specific master's programs.

ANTH 598. GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

ANTH 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

ANTH 600. THESIS. 1-6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
The objective of this course is to conduct original research as part of the completion of a research study bound as a thesis. This document provides partial fulfillment of the MA requirement and will be completed under the direction of a graduate committee. The thesis is designed to sharpen research, writing, and organizational skills.

ANTH 601. RESEARCH REPORT. 1-5 Credits.