Disability Studies Graduate Certificate

This is an archived copy of the 2016-2017 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ewu.edu.

The Graduate Disability Studies Certificate, a 15–25 credit credit program provides three options. The 15 credit program educates students about disability, disability culture and the lived experiences of persons with disabilities. The 20 credit Critical Disability Studies Certificate explores the liberal arts foundation of disability studies and diversity studies. The 20 credit Applied Disability Studies Certificate applies laws and policies to the study of human rights and diversity. Students successfully completing all 25 DSST credits earn the Critical and Applied Disability Studies Certificate.

Required Courses15
DISABILITY, CULTURE AND SOCIETY
DISABILITY AS DIVERSITY
INTERDISCIPLINARY PROJECT IN UNIVERSAL ACCESS
Expanded Certificate Option0-10
Applied Disability Studies
HUMAN DIVERSITY AND SOCIETY: LAWS AND SOCIAL POLICIES
Critical Disability Studies
DISABILITY: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES FROM THE LIBERAL ARTS AND HUMANITIES
Critical and Applied Disability Studies
HUMAN DIVERSITY AND SOCIETY: LAWS AND SOCIAL POLICIES
and DISABILITY: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES FROM THE LIBERAL ARTS AND HUMANITIES
Total Credits15-25
 

Student Learning Outcomes—students will

  • demonstrate knowledge of the perceptions and beliefs about disability throughout history and in contemporary society;
  • identify Disability culture and recognize the contributions of disabled/ Disabled persons in society;
  • recognize how laws and policies influence the lives of people with disabilities
  • analyze societal representations of defining disability including the moral, medical and social models;
  • analyze the place of disability and disabled persons in academic traditions and disciplines, and in society as a whole;
  • understand disability as a characteristic in the diverse tapestry of society;
  • apply the principles of universal access to disability and to other diverse societal characteristics.

Additional Student Learning Outcomes, Applied Disability Studies Certificate:

  • analyze how laws and policies influence the lives of people with disabilities and other traditionally devalued populations based on characteristics including race/ ethnicity, sex and gender, sexual orientation and gender identity, religion and nationality;
  • apply a framework for evaluating the impact of laws and policies relative to those that, a) limit or deny groups; b) address or redress problems categorically; c) provide benefits or opportunities to specific groups, and/ or d) are universally and non-categorically based.

Additional Student Learning Outcomes, Critical Disability Studies Certificate:

  • understand the place and value of disabled people within the foundational philosophies of Western society;
  • articulate the nature, and problematic character, of representations of disability in literature, film, art, and performance;
  • critique contemporary depictions and deployments of disability;
  • recognize and appreciate how people with disabilities and Disability culture have, and continue to, develop their own counter-narratives.

Additional Student Learning Outcomes, Critical and Applied Disability Studies Certificate:

  • analyze how laws and policies influence the lives of people with disabilities and other traditionally devalued populations based on characteristics including race/ ethnicity, sex and gender, sexual orientation and gender identity, religion and nationality;
  • apply a framework for evaluating the impact of laws and policies relative to those that, a) limit or deny groups; b) address or redress problems categorically; c) provide benefits or opportunities to specific groups, and/ or d) are universally and non-categorically based.
  • understand the place and value of disabled people within the foundational philosophies of Western society;
  • articulate the nature, and problematic character, of representations of disability in literature, film, art, and performance;
  • critique contemporary depictions and deployments of disability;
  • recognize and appreciate how people with disabilities and Disability culture have, and continue to, develop their own counter-narratives.