Africana Studies (AAST)


AAST 101. INTRODUCTION TO AFRICANA STUDIES. 5 Credits.

This course is a critical survey of the major themes, issues, concepts, methods, philosophies, theories and scholars in the discipline of Africana studies and its historic origin and evolution.

AAST 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

AAST 214. AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE AND EXPRESSIONS. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HONS 214, HUMN 214.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
An interdisciplinary survey of African American culture beginning with ancient African history and traditions through contemporary issues in the African American experience. Attention given to basic principles of history, sociology, political science, economics and the arts in the study of the dynamics of the African American culture.

AAST 215. EARLY AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY: ANCIENT AFRICA TO THE END OF THE RECONSTRUCTION 1877. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HONS 215, HIST 215.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
Examines the African American experience from African civilizations in the 4th century AD through slavery to the end of the Reconstruction era in the United States.

AAST 220. AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY: POST CIVIL WAR TO PRESENT. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HONS 220, HIST 220.
Satisfies: the GECR for social sciences, list 3, history.
The study of American history from the perspective of the African American experience since the end of the Reconstruction period.

AAST 222. AFRICAN AMERICAN ECONOMICS. 5 Credits.

Focuses on the economic conditions of African Americans, presenting an analysis of economic problems confronting them, and institutional aspects of those problems.

AAST 299. SPECIAL STUDIES. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Studies vary according to faculty and student interest.

AAST 301. HARLEM RENAISSANCE: RECONSTRUCTION TO 1930. 5 Credits.

A selective and objective study of the cultural, ideological, and political contributions of African Americans during the period 1918-1929.

AAST 310. AFRICAN AMERICAN SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL THOUGHT FROM BOOKER T. WASHINGTON TO CORNEL WEST. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: AAST 214.
This course articulates, defines and analyses the significant social thoughts, strategies and philosophies of black intellectuals through the 20th century to the present as they sought to address and propose viable solutions to the color-line.

AAST 315. AFRICAN HISTORY: ANCIENT AFRICA TO MANDELA. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HIST 315, HONS 315.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
A survey of African history from prehistory to the present. Emphasizes earlier African civilizations, extensive contact with the outside world and the formation of African nations.

AAST 320. AFRICAN AMERICAN FAMILY. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: SOCI 371, SOWK 320.
The African American Family as a social system influenced by institutions of the larger American society.

AAST 321. AFRICAN AMERICAN POLITICAL AWARENESS. 5 Credits.

Issues of African American political power and awareness as they relate to several studies of macro and micro institutional racism with alternatives for racial change.

AAST 331. HISTORY AND DYNAMICS OF U.S. SLAVERY. 2 Credits.

This class involves a brief examination of North American slavery, its background, its dynamics, and its legacy. Special attention will be given to issues regarding U.S. race relations today.

AAST 347. PEOPLES OF AFRICA. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: ANTH 347.
A comparative view of tradition and change in sub-Saharan Africa.

AAST 375. AFRICAN AMERICAN CINEMA: 1915–1990. 5 Credits.

African American cinema explores the history of African Americans in films, focusing particularly on Hollywood's representations of Blacks in feature length films. The course examines such issues as the representations of race, gender, and sexuality through observing and discussing feature films in class. Great emphasis will be placed on critical viewing, thinking, analyzing and writing aboutfilms. Ultimately, the course will not only investigate Hollywood's representations of African Americans, but also will examine the struggle and emergence of independent, African American produced films which offer a separate and unique voice that not only challenges Hollywood's representations, but also expresses themes involving cultural identity.

AAST 381. CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: ENGL 381.
Major African American literature of the 20th century: fiction, poetry, essay, autobiography and drama.

AAST 395. INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Internships vary according to program and student interest.

AAST 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

AAST 398. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Seminar.

AAST 399. SPECIAL STUDIES. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: sophomore standing: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Studies vary according to faculty and student interest.

AAST 424. ECONOMICS OF POVERTY AND DISCRIMINATION. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: ECON 424, WMST 426.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
Causes of poverty and evaluation of anti-poverty programs. Examines economic theories of discrimination from different perspectives with a particular focus on issues of gender and race.

AAST 430. AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN'S HISTORY. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: WMST 430.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
This course examines historical writings by and about Black women, discussing slavery, lynching, combating prejudices and encouraging racial pride to provide a framework that will deepen understanding of the topic.

AAST 435. NEGRO SPIRITUALS. 1 Credit.

This course offers an immersion in the music and culture of enslaved Africans to understand how and why the music developed. The purpose of the music then and now is examined as well as its impact on modern music.

AAST 465. SLAVERY IN THE NEW WORLD. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HIST 465.
This course traces new world slavery from its origins in the islands off the west coast of Africa to the end of slavery in United States, Cuba and Brazil in the late nineteenth century. Topics covered include the Atlantic slave trade, the effects of the slave trade on Africa, the Haitian Revolution, slavery and the Enlightenment philosophies, the profitability of slavery and the abolition movement.

AAST 466. SLAVERY IN THE U.S.. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HIST 466.
This course covers the rise and fall of slavery in the United States and its colonial antecedents. Topics include the transition from indentured servitude to slavery in the Chesapeake in the 1680s, the role slaves played on both sides of the Revolutionary War, the rise of the Cotton Kingdom, the political controversy over slavery, the rise of the abolition movement and the disintegration of slavery during the Civil War.

AAST 481. DR. KING AND MALCOLM X: A COMPARISON. 2 Credits.

This class involves a brief examination into the backgrounds, lives and careers of Dr. King and Malcolm X. Comparison and contrast will be employed to gain a deeper insight into the ideology and effectiveness of each leader with regard to the civil rights movement.

AAST 495. AFRICANA STUDIES INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
Pre-requisites: junior standing: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
This course requires a supervised student practicum in the internal or external African or African American endeavor. May be but not limited to designing or working on a particular project or event for the betterment of an aspect of the African or African American lived experience on campus or in the surrounding area.

AAST 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-15 Credits.

AAST 497. AFRICANA STUDIES WORKSHOP. 1-5 Credits.

Workshops are held to examine issues in this area.

AAST 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

AAST 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Directed study and research projects vary according to faculty and student interest.