Indian Studies (IDST)


IDST 101. INTRODUCTION TO INDIAN STUDIES. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
This course introduces the basic philosophy (spiritual and intellectual sources), method and major topics of the discipline. Material explored includes organizing concepts, theories and patterns within a historical context-including white contact time and pre-white contact time.

IDST 196. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

Experimental

IDST 201. SALISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE I. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: IDST 101.
These courses are the beginning courses in Salish language and culture, focusing on the nselzcin dialect traditionally spoken by the aboriginal people of the northern areas of central and Eastern Washington as well as southern British Columbia. Students will learn to speak and understand basic Salish vocabulary and phrases, and will be introduced to the International Phonetic Alphabet as applied to nselxcin.

IDST 202. SALISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE II. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: IDST 201.
These courses are the beginning courses in Salish language and culture, focusing on the nselzcin dialect traditionally spoken by the aboriginal people of the northern areas of central and Eastern Washington as well as southern British Columbia. Students will learn to speak and understand basic Salish vocabulary and phrases, and will be introduced to the International Phonetic Alphabet as applied to nselxcin.

IDST 203. SALISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE III. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: IDST 202.
These courses are the beginning courses in Salish language and culture, focusing on the nselzcin dialect traditionally spoken by the aboriginal people of the northern areas of central and Eastern Washington as well as southern British Columbia. Students will learn to speak and understand basic Salish vocabulary and phrases, and will be introduced to the International Phonetic Alphabet as applied to nselxcin.

IDST 296. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 4 Credits.

Experimental

IDST 316. AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY I. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HIST 316.
This course introduces students to an overview of American Indian history through major themes which include impact and response to European contact, conquest and colonization, empire building, removal and dispossession from traditional lands, treaty making and the origins of federal Indian policy.

IDST 317. AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY II. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HIST 317.
This course introduces students to an overview to American Indian history from 1887 to the present. Major themes covered in this course include but not limited to questions regarding history as a discipline, origins of indigenous peoples, impacts and responses to colonization and genocide, beginning from assimilationist policies, self-determination, termination and relocation, Red Power movement, gender, sovereignty, identity, land, environment and current issues facing American Indian peoples and communities today.

IDST 321. CONTEMPORARY INDIAN ISSUES. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
This course will examine the contemporary educational, social, political and cultural issues currently impacting Native American communities. Through individual and group research, students will discuss a range of issues including educational reform, community organizing, economic development, land rights, the breakdown of traditional families and culturally relevant program development within various Native American communities. Focus will be on the Native American nations throughout North America.

IDST 325. NATIVE AMERICAN WRITING. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101.
The course focuses on the development of writing from a Native American perspective. Through the study of various Native American writers, writing exercises, and skills development, students will develop their own writing style.

IDST 330. INDIAN WARS: PAST AND PRESENT. 5 Credits.

The focus of this course is Indian wars of the Pacific Northwest during the first stages of white conquest. It will also include the study of contemporary native American political and social struggles.

IDST 338. AMERICAN INDIAN CINEMA. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: IDST 101.
This course explores how the Hollywood film industry both constructs and appropriates images of American Indians. The course examine Native American themed films, which have been made by both Native and non-natives, in order to critically compare the images presented from each perspective.

IDST 380. SURVEY OF NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: ENGL 380.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201 or permission of instructor.
Satisfies: cultural and gender diversity university graduation requirement.
Designed to introduce students to specific examples of narrative, ceremonial, ritualistic, religious and secular literatures from the oral traditions of Indian Nations in North America and South America. Also introduces students to contemporary genres (i.e., poetry, the short story, the novel and drama) as they emerge from the oral traditions, with the specific purpose of articulating the continuity as reflected in literary genres.

IDST 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

Experimental

IDST 397. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Workshop

IDST 398. SEMINAR. 4 Credits.

Seminar

IDST 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 5 Credits.

Directed Study

IDST 420. READINGS IN DECOLONIZATION. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: CHST 420.
Pre-requisites: IDST 101 and CHST 101.
This course grounds students in the theory and concepts of colonization, decolonization and indigenous peoples in America, with brief comparisons with global indigenous peoples and experiences. Through that theoretical understanding, students examine and formulate ways in which decolonization can impact and be integrated into indigenous lives and communities in a meaningful way.

IDST 421. FEDERAL INDIAN LAW AND POLICY I. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: POLI 421.
This is the first course in a two course series on federal Indian law and policy. Federal Indian law is the body of law that regulates the relationship between Indian tribes and the United States. Federal Indian policy consists of the various doctrines underlying federal legislative and executive actions affecting Indian tribes. This course will introduce students to laws, regulations and case law that comprise federal Indian law as well as the policies underlying those4 laws. Topics will be further explored through the use of case studies.

IDST 422. FEDERAL INDIAN LAW AND POLICY II. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: POLI 422.
This course is a continuation of IDST 421. Topics include Modern Trust doctrine, the Federal-Tribal Relationship, congressional plenary power, tribal land and sovereignty issues, and tribal justice systems. These topics are explored through the use of case studies.

IDST 437. INDIAN CHILD WELFARE. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: SOWK 437.
Satisfies: Cultural and Gender Diversity in the U.S.
This course introduces Indian Child Welfare (ICW) with an emphasis on understanding legal, historical, and cultural issues applying to work with American Indian and Alaska Native families. This course describes ICW as a method of culturally appropriate child welfare practice that draws on traditions of American Indian and Alaska Native nations. Many elements of ICW may serve as evidence-based best practice principles for child welfare. The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (ICWA, United States Code Title 25, §1901-1963) is central to this course and child welfare practice.

IDST 477. CONTEMPORARY INDIGENOUS WOMEN. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: WMST 477.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
This course is designed to introduce students to the role of indigenous women in the struggles for national self determination from a historical/cultural/spiritual/political context. Historically, indigenous women have always played a very prominent and powerful role within all spheres of indigenous social/political/cultural and economic issues affecting indigenous nations from a contemporary context.

IDST 480. NATIVE AMERICAN ORAL TRADITION. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HIST 480.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
This course expands the students’ understanding of the past through the inclusion of indigenous perspectives. Students will examine the use of oral traditions/histories, particularly the contestation regarding their validity as legitimate, historical sources. This course also examines the evolution of tribal and oral traditions from early records of their existence to the modern issues surrounding their use and maintenance. Students are introduced to the issues, ethics and protocol when working with tribal members and communities.

IDST 485. INDIGENOUS EDUCATION. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: EDUC 485.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
Satisfies: international studies university graduation requirement.
This course introduces students to the topic of indigenous education from a global perspective. Through readings, discussions, lectures and videos, students will examine the role education has played as an instrument of oppression, and how indigenous nations have restructured educational systems to reclaim their cultural identities and to empower themselves politically.

IDST 495. INDIAN STUDIES INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

IDST 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

Experimental.

IDST 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Workshop

IDST 498. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Seminar

IDST 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Independent study in areas of Indian Studies.

IDST 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Graduate level directed study and research projects in American Indian and Indigenous studies varying according to faculty and student interest.