inside.ewu.edu

Education (EDUC)


EDUC 146. COLLEGE READING AND STUDY TECHNIQUES. 5 Credits.

Individual evaluation, prescription, and practice for improvement of study reading, note-taking, spelling, and study techniques.

EDUC 150. READING/STUDY SKILLS. 1-2 Credits.

Notes: students may earn a maximum of two credits a quarter and may earn a total of five credits during their tenure at the university.]
This class is to assist students with reading and study skills. Techniques introduced and practiced within content areas of courses in which the students are enrolled include: time management, textbook reading, taking lecture notes, reduce-SQ3R, retain-SQ3R, test taking skills. Reading enhancement will involve techniques for improving rate, comprehension, vocabulary and critical reading. Other skills addressed may include spelling and tutoring for specific subjects. [Special

EDUC 195. INTERNSHIP. 1-6 Credits.

EDUC 196. ADVANCED STUDY SKILLS. 1-2 Credits.

EDUC 197. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

EDUC 201. INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION. 3 Credits.

EDUC 201 is an overview of the role of the schools in a democratic society, an introduction of reflective thinking concept for professional educators, an analysis of various philosophical views of teaching and learning, and an introduction to the restructuring of the K-12 educational system in the state of Washington.

EDUC 250. INTRODUCTION TO TRAUMA INFORMED PRACTICE FOR EDUCATORS. 4 Credits.

This introductory course introduces and defines the characteristics of trauma, ACEs, and their impact on childhood development and learning. This course introduces how those in the educational system can support students from diverse backgrounds who are experiencing or have experienced trauma.

EDUC 260. DIRECT INSTRUCTION MENTORING. 1-6 Credits.

Classroom mentoring experiences using Direct Instruction teaching techniques and curriculum.

EDUC 280. FOUNDATIONAL METHODS IN EDUCATION. 12-18 Credits.

Notes: this course serves the alternate-route program.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201 or equivalent.
This module is an introduction to the foundations of assessment, management, special education, ELL, and elementary reading. Candidates will evaluate their current competencies and begin their portfolios with evidence for competencies.

EDUC 296. EXPERIMENTAL. 1-5 Credits.

EDUC 299. SPECIAL STUDIES. 1-18 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Subjects studied vary according to faculty and student interests.

EDUC 300. INTRODUCTION TO CLASSROOM EXPERIENCE. 1-4 Credits.

Notes: Graded Pass/Fail. This course is open to students admitted to the Education Program only. After registering for EDUC 300, sign up for placements in the Department of Education.
Pre-requisites: Washington State Patrol form submitted.
Observation and participation in public school classroom management and instruction. Your schedule must be arranged so time can be spent in a public school classroom during the day.

EDUC 303. FOUNDATIONS OF ASSESSMENT. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission into the Teacher Education Program, EDUC 304, or department authorization.
This class focuses on developing objectives, lesson planning, assessment of student learning, measurement and assessment of the total school program including National and State Learning Goals/Standards and Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements.

EDUC 304. INTRODUCTION TO ELEMENTARY READING. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program required. Department authorization and application required for admission. Evidence of taking the Washington Education Skill Test-Basic (WEST B) or satisfactory SAT or ACT scores; a minimum cumulative GPA ≥2.8 and completion of required prerequisite courses with a B- or higher in each course.
This course investigates reading processes, emergent literacy, word identification, vocabulary and comprehension in elementary reading programs.

EDUC 305. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE STUDY AND USE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the Education Program.
This course includes selected readings and discussions of a variety of children’s books. It allows students to become acquainted with quality children’s literature and suggests media center and K–8 classroom uses.

EDUC 308. FOUNDATIONS OF ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 303, EDUC 310, EDUC 338, and EDUC 340.
This course addresses organizational patterns, management skills, discipline practices, individual actions and classroom environmental conditions needed to provide an optimum learning environment at the elementary level.

EDUC 309. FOUNDATIONS OF SECONDARY CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program required. Department authorization and application required for admission. Evidence of taking the Washington Education Skill Test-Basic (WEST B) or satisfactory SAT or ACT scores; a minimum cumulative GPA ≥2.8. Grades ≥B- in each of these courses: ENGL 201, MATH proficiency course, CMST 200, EDUC 201, PSYC 204, SPED 363, or proof of equivalence. Concurrent enrollment with EDUC 303, EDUC 341, EDUC 386A and EDUC 413.
This course addresses organizational patterns, management skills, discipline practices, individual actions and classroom environmental conditions needed to provide an optimum learning environment at the secondary level.

EDUC 310. LITERACY METHODS, MANAGEMENT AND ASSESSMENT IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 4 Credits.

Notes: Washington State Patrol Clearance/FBI fingerprinting clearance.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 304.
Concurrent enrollment with EDUC 303, EDUC 338, EDUC 340, and EDUC 386A (3 credits minimum). This course extends the understanding of the reading process approach to teaching reading across the elementary school curriculum (K–8). Lesson plan development includes assessment of student learning and classroom management. Placement in P-12 school with minimum 3 hour per week field experience required.

EDUC 320. ASSESSING AND DIFFERENTIATING LITERACY INSTRUCTION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 304; may be taken concurrently with EDUC 310.
This course offers a comprehensive look at formative and summative assessments for reading, writing and oral language development for P-12 students including those at risk. Candidates learn to use assessment data, make instructional decisions and prepare professional reports.

EDUC 323. A GLOBAL VIEW THROUGH CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: ENGL 323.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–global studies.
By reading and discussing a variety of children’s literature titles across several interrelated thematic units, students will examine cultural constructs, gain familiarity with international cultures, work toward empathy for other peoples and practice a critical reading stance about stories from around the world. Coursework will include papers, journals, large and small group discussions and presentations.

EDUC 325. INEQUALITIES AND IMPACTS ON EDUCATIONAL EQUITY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of instructor.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
An exploration of concepts, principles and theories of educational equity and their function within a society. This course includes issues of ethnicity and race, socioeconomic status and gender inequalities within the U.S. and the impact of those inequalities on educational equity.

EDUC 338. LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS 1: INTEGRATED LANGUAGE ARTS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 4 Credits.

Notes: Washington State Patrol Clearance/FBI fingerprinting clearance required.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 304.
Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 303, EDUC 310, EDUC 340 and EDUC 386A (minimum of 3 credits). Placement in P–8 school with minimum of nine hours per week field experience required. This course examines the environment needed to teach the skills of listening, speaking and writing in the elementary program; including lesson plan development, assessment of student learning and classroom management and integration with social studies instruction.

EDUC 340. LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS 2: INTEGRATED SOCIAL STUDIES FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 4 Credits.

Notes: Washington State Patrol Clearance/FBI fingerprinting clearance required.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 304.
Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 303, EDUC 310, EDUC 338, and EDUC 386A (minimum of 3 credits). This course includes formulation of goals for social studies, selection of content to be taught at each grade level, development of daily lesson plans and unit plans utilizing recommended teaching strategies, integrated strategies with language arts instruction, assessment of student learning and classroom management and participation in teaching lessons in an elementary classroom.

EDUC 341. SECONDARY STRATEGIES, MANAGEMENT, ASSESSMENT. 3 Credits.

Notes: Washington State Patrol/FBI fingerprinting clearance.
Pre-requisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program. Concurrent enrollment with EDUC 303, EDUC 309, EDUC 386A and EDUC 413.
This course deals with teaching and learning procedures appropriate for courses in the junior and senior high school. It demonstrates a variety of teaching strategies. Candidates develop skills in basic instructional techniques including lesson plan development, assessment of student learning and classroom management. The course is designed to supplement methods course work taken in major departments. Placement in P–12 school with minimum nine hour per week field experience required.

EDUC 344. EARLY NUMERACY INSTRUCTION IN THE P-3 SCHOOL SETTING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH 107 or MATH 208 or equivalent. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 454.
This course combines early numeracy content with research based methods and strategies in order to prepare students to effectively teach rigorous, developmentally appropriate mathematics in preschool through third grade classrooms. This course is designed to give students an understanding of how children progress in their mathematical thinking and learning and how to facilitate high quality learning experiences.

EDUC 350. TRAUMA-INFORMED EDUCATIONAL PRACTICES FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS IN EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 250.
This course introduces methods of trauma-informed instruction, assessment, interventions, and connections to MTSS/PBIS. Candidates apply the 6 principles of trauma-informed care to planning, instruction, management, assessment, and teacher reflection and practice tiered-support strategies for students.

EDUC 380. INTEGRATED STEM METHODS 1. 4 Credits.

Notes: Washington State Patrol Clearance / FBI Fingerprint Clearance required.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 303, EDUC 310, EDUC 338, EDUC 340, EDUC 386A.
Concurrent enrollment with EDUC 381 and EDUC 386B (minimum 3 credits). This course introduces and models integrated methods for science, engineering, math and technology in the elementary school. Course content includes the formulation of goals for instruction in science and engineering, selection of content to be taught at each grade level, development of daily lesson plans and unit plans utilizing recommended teaching strategies, assessment of student learning and classroom management and participation in teaching lessons in an elementary classroom.

EDUC 381. INTEGRATED STEM METHODS 2. 4 Credits.

Notes: Washington State Patrol Clearance / FBI Fingerprint Clearance required.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 303, EDUC 310, EDUC 338, EDUC 340, EDUC 386A.
Concurrent enrollment with EDUC 380 and EDUC 386B (3 credits minimum). This course introduces and models integrated methods for science, engineering, math and technology in the elementary school. Course content includes the formulation of goals for instruction in math and technology, selection of content to be taught at each grade level, development of daily lesson plans and unit plans utilizing recommended teaching strategies, assessment of student learning and classroom management and participation in teaching lessons in an elementary classroom.

EDUC 385. FOUNDATIONS OF DEVELOPMENTALLY APPROPRIATE PRACTICES. 4 Credits.

Notes: EDUC 385 is a required prerequisite for EDUC 395.
This course will survey the history, theory and current issues/trends of the birth – five early childhood education field. An emphasis will be placed on high-quality early childhood education service delivery models. This course is specifically designed for students who are not pursuing teacher certification but who are likely to work with others in providing services to young children and their families.

EDUC 386A. FIELD EXPERIENCE AND PRACTICUM. 3-5 Credits.

Notes: Washington State Patrol Clearance / FBI Fingerprint Clearance required. A weekly seminar is required. Your schedule must be arranged so time can be spent in a public school classroom during the day.
Pre-requisites: admission to the Education program.
This course requires participation in public school instruction, classroom management, assessment and professional development and provides an opportunity for integration with content learned in methods courses.

EDUC 386B. FIELD EXPERIENCE AND PRACTICUM. 3-12 Credits.

Notes: Washington State Patrol Clearance / FBI Fingerprint Clearance required. A weekly seminar is required. Your schedule must be arranged so time can be spent in a public school classroom during the day.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 386A.
This course requires participation in public school instruction, classroom management, assessment and professional development and provides an opportunity for integration with content learned in methods courses.

EDUC 386C. FIELD EXPERIENCE AND PRACTICUM. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: Washington State Patrol Clearance / FBI Fingerprint Clearance required. A weekly seminar is required. Your schedule must be arranged so time can be spent in a public school classroom during the day.
Pre-requisites: admission to the Education program.
This course requires participation in public school instruction, classroom management, assessment and professional development and provides an opportunity for integration with content learned in methods courses.

EDUC 386D. P3 FIELD EXPERIENCE AND PRACTICUM. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: admission to the Education program and EDUC 451.
This course supports placements and provides candidates opportunities to identify and use multiple instructional strategies to address individual student needs, prepare responsible citizens for a diverse society, assess children, review progress, reflect on student performance, and develop learning outcomes with TSG.

EDUC 386E. P3 FIELD EXPERIENCE AND PRACTICUM. 3 Credits.

Notes: Washington State Patrol Clearance/FBI Fingerprint Clearance required. Seminar will be required intermittently throughout the quarter. Your schedule must be arranged so time can be spent in a public school classroom during the day.
Pre-requisites: admission to the Education program and EDUC 386D.
This course requires participation in public school instruction, classroom management, assessment and professional development and provides an opportunity for integration with content learned in methods courses.

EDUC 387. LITERACY AND SPECIALIST METHODS. 12-18 Credits.

Notes: this course serves the alternate-route program.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 280.
Candidates will spend time in a Music, Art and Physical education setting and provide evidences that they have met the elementary competencies in those areas. Coursework modules will focus on specialist instruction and literacy instruction in the elementary school. Includes full-time practicum classroom experience.

EDUC 388. ELEMENTARY CORE METHODS. 12-18 Credits.

Notes: This course serves the alternate-route program. The multicultural verification assessment is a signature assessment completed in this quarter and includes 30 hours in a diverse setting and a reflection of learning outcomes. Includes a full-time classroom practicum experience.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 387.
Candidates will master methods of elementary instruction including English language arts, math, science and social studies. Course meetings will further develop professional and cohort needs, especially in equity pedagogy.

EDUC 389. SPECIAL EDUCATION METHODS 1. 18 Credits.

Notes: This course serves the alternate-route program. The SPED Methods Module 1 is a full-time hybrid module integrating fieldwork and SPED coursework.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 280.
This course serves the Transition to Teaching alternate route program. Candidates will master methods of instruction in Special Education. Course meetings will further develop professional and cohort needs, especially in pedagogy.

EDUC 390. FOUNDATIONS OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 3 Credits.

A survey of theories of human development that shape blended early childhood practices and inform classroom-teaching practices. Introduction to professional/ethical standards associated with the blended early childhood field. Students review position statements on ethics, inclusion, developmentally appropriate and recommended practices from leading professional organizations. Topics include: brain development, development milestones, historical/political/legal foundations relating to ECE/ECSE.

EDUC 391. SPECIAL EDUCATION METHODS 2. 18 Credits.

Notes: This course serves the alternative-route program. The SPED Module 2 is a full-time hybrid module integrating fieldwork and SPED coursework.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 389.
This class will build a foundation for your upcoming student teaching in special education and growing in your career to certification. Students will connect and reflect on best practices in special education methods including classroom management, behavior management, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Severe Disabilities, and research methods.

EDUC 393. ELL METHODS MODULE 1: LANGUAGE AND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION. 18 Credits.

Notes: This course serves the alternative-route program. The ELL Module 1 is a full-time hybrid module integrating fieldwork and SPED coursework.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 280.
This course is part of a hybrid alternative route program that leads to an English language learner (ELL) endorsement to be added to a K–8 teaching certificate in Washington state. The course provides an overview of language development and implications for teaching and practicum.

EDUC 394. METHODS FOR READING INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT IN KINDERGARTEN-THIRD GRADE SETTINGS. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 479.
This course provides students with foundational skills for supporting reading for understanding in kindergarten through third grade. Course content outlines scientifically based reading instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Students will become skilled in evidence-based practices for reading instruction through the use of tiered instruction and data-driven decisions.

EDUC 395. METHODS FOR IMPLEMENTING DEVELOPMENTALLY APPROPRIATE PRACTICES. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 385.
This course will provide a framework for pre-professionals to deliver evidence-based practices in birth–five early childhood settings. Course topics build on a strong understanding of typical development and include early childhood assessment, positive behavior supports and the implementation of integrated curriculum content areas. This course is specifically designed for students who are not pursuing teacher certification but who are likely to work with others in providing services to young children and their families.

EDUC 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

EDUC 397. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

EDUC 398. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

EDUC 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-18 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

EDUC 400. ELL METHODS MODULE 2: CULTURE AND LITERACY DEVELOPMENT. 18 Credits.

Notes: This course serves the alternative-route program. The ELL Module 2 is a full-time hybrid module integrating fieldwork and SPED coursework.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 393.
This course is part of a hybrid alternative route program that leads to an English language learner (ELL) endorsement to be added to a K–8 teaching certificate in Washington state. The course provides an overview of the role of culture in second language literacy development and implications for teaching; and practicum experiences with ELLs.

EDUC 401. YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE STUDY AND USE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 304, may be taken concurrently.
This course is designed to provide teachers with the skills and information to develop and implement a classroom literacy program for middle and secondary students. It emphasizes instructional strategies to accommodate student diversity using a selection of literature genres as the curriculum foundation.

EDUC 402. ADMISSION TO RESEARCH/INTERNSHIP. 2 Credits.

Notes: this course is a prerequisite for the internship or research project for the major.
Students explore choices in internship and research projects, career preparation options, and portfolio completion requirements and standards. Students secure internship placements.

EDUC 403. LITERACY ASSESSMENT PRACTICUM. 1 Credit.

Notes: candidates spend three hours/week in their practicum.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 320 must be taken concurrently.
In this practicum for literacy majors/minors, candidates administer literacy assessments in a K–12 classroom. This course focuses on administering formative and summative assessments for reading, writing and oral language development for P-12 students. Candidates learn to use assessment data, make instructional decisions and prepare professional reports.

EDUC 404. EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS AND CLASSROOM APPLICATION. 9-12 Credits.

Notes: this course serves the alternate-route program and includes a full-time classroom practicum.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 387.
This course allows teacher candidates to analyze their classroom experiences, and develop and implement a philosophy for elementary instruction. Students examine the historical, philosophical and social foundations of education, learning theories, and use of technology media to create integrated lessons that have a positive impact on student learning.

EDUC 405. BILINGUAL METHODS. 18 Credits.

Notes: This course serves the alternative-route program. Taken with EDUC 393, these courses satisfy the Bilingual Endorsement coursework requirement.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 393.
This course is designed to develop a conceptual foundation on issues related to bilingual education, as well as prepare students for the WEST–E exam. As a result, the course focuses on various aspects of bilingual education, current research in the field, and applying bilingual methods and strategies to develop lessons and teaching practices. Students observe bilingual teachers working in different educational settings.

EDUC 409. TEACHING THE GIFTED AND TALENTED. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Washington State Patrol form submitted.
Analyzes the characteristics of educational programs for the gifted and talented. Helps you develop teaching strategies and curriculum materials designed to provide appropriate educational programs for the gifted and talented.

EDUC 410. METHODS I: BLENDED CURRICULUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission into the education department.
This course provides students with an introduction to evidence-based practices and professional standards for planning and delivering curriculum in inclusive ECE/ECSE classrooms. Students will become skilled in utilizing principles of Universal Design for Learning for planning child-focused, intentional teaching in natural learning environments.

EDUC 411. LITERACY FOR LINGUISTICALLY AND CULTURALLY DIVERSE LEARNERS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 304, may be taken concurrently.
This course allows teacher candidates to analyze cultural and language differences that may influence how P–12 students acquire literacy. It focuses on teaching students for whom English is not the heritage or first language.

EDUC 412. CONTENT AREA LITERACY: MANAGEMENT AND ASSESSMENT FOR LITERACY MAJORS AND MINORS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 304, may be taken concurrently.
This course presents a variety of strategies for improving P–12 students’ comprehension of content area materials and techniques for analyzing written materials. Assessment of student learning and classroom management is covered.

EDUC 413. CONTENT AREA LITERACY: MANAGEMENT AND ASSESSMENT FOR SECONDARY EDUCATION CANDIDATES. 3 Credits.

Notes: Washington State Patrol/FBI fingerprinting clearance. Departmental Clearance required prior to registration.
Pre-requisites: Admission to Teacher Education program. Concurrent enrollment with EDUC 303, EDUC 309, EDUC 341, and EDUC 386A.
This course presents a variety of strategies for improving 5–12 students’ comprehension of content area materials and techniques for analyzing written materials. Lesson plan development includes assessment of student learning and classroom management.

EDUC 416. WRITING PROCESS ACROSS THE CURRICULUM. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 304, may be taken concurrently.
This course provides candidates with a theoretical and strategic approach to writing pedagogy. Teacher candidates are prepared to teach writing across the curriculum.

EDUC 417. CULTURE OF MIDDLE SCHOOL. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 201.
This course will promote awareness and understanding of middle level-aged students, of the philosophy and organization of middle level schools and programs and of developmentally appropriate instructional and classroom management strategies for teaching middle level learners.

EDUC 421. COMPETENCY PREPARATION. 1 Credit.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 386A.
This course emphasizes competence and skills required in testing for teaching readiness including, a) critical thinking skills; b) preparing for tests, test-taking strategies, and specific strategies for content practice tests; c) creating good review tools, predicting test questions and testing readiness; d) West-E or NES score analysis and self-review for specific areas of remediation; and, e) study skills and time management skills for complex standardized testing.

EDUC 423. ELEMENTARY STUDENT TEACHING K-8. 12 Credits.

Notes: Graded Pass/Fail. Washington State Patrol and FBI clearance must be current. All students must have a minimum overall GPA ≥B- in each of the following: major(s), minor(s) and Professional Education Program.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 386B and departmental clearance required prior to registration.
All course grades in the student’s major(s), minor(s) and the Professional Education Program must be at least B-. Students must have completed at least three-fourths of the coursework for their major(s) and minor(s) before taking this course. For a complete description of activities and procedures associated with student teaching, please refer to the department’s Student Teaching Handbook. Seminar required.

EDUC 426. SECONDARY STUDENT TEACHING 7-12. 12 Credits.

Notes: Graded Pass/Fail. Washington State Patrol and FBI clearance must be current. All students must have a minimum overall GPA ≥ 2.8 in each of the following: major(s), minor(s) and Professional Education Program.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 386B and departmental clearance required prior to registration.
All course grades in the student’s major(s), minor(s) and the Professional Education Program must be ≥B-. Departmental clearance required prior to registration. Students must have completed at least three-fourths of the coursework for their major(s) and minor(s) before taking this course. All students must have a minimum overall GPA ≥2.8 and ≥B- in each course for the following: major(s), minor(s) and Professional Education Program. Washington State Patrol and FBI clearance must be current. Refer to Student Teaching Handbook for complete description of requirements. Seminar required.

EDUC 427. GENERAL STUDENT TEACHING K-12. 3-15 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 386B, may be concurrent enrollment, or EDUC 386E.
Departmental clearance required prior to registration. Students must have completed at least three-fourths of the coursework for their major(s) and minor(s) before taking this course. All students must have a minimum overall GPA ≥2.8 in each of the following: major(s), minor(s) and Professional Education Program. All course grades in the student’s major(s), minor(s) and the Professional Education Program must be ≥B-. Washington State Patrol and FBI clearance must be current. Seminar required.

EDUC 428. STUDENT TEACHING MODULE. 18 Credits.

Notes: This course serves the alternate-route program. The Student Teaching Module is a full-time teaching experience in a K-8 setting.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 404.
Student teaching seminars will address professional development and cohort needs for both candidates and mentors. Candidates will complete and meet edTPA requirements.

EDUC 430. ASSESSMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission into the education department.
Using a variety of assessment practices, this course explores how to assess and guide the learning of young children ages birth to eight. Course content includes writing measurable goals and objectives, using data based decision making, understanding scores and communicating results, as well as ethical considerations and cultural bias in assessment.

EDUC 439. SEMINAR. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: repeatable for credit with different titles.
Content and titles will vary as education special topics are identified by faculty and students to study relevant and in-depth education concepts, knowledge and skills.

EDUC 440. SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND SUSTAINABILITY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to the Education program.
This seminar provides depth in selected topics in sustainability and environmental education.

EDUC 444. LANGUAGE ARTS METHODS FOR THE PRESCHOOL-THIRD GRADE CLASSROOM. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 394.
This course provides students with rich experiences in Language Arts education for ECE/ECSE classrooms. Course content examines the environment needed to teach the skills of listening, speaking, and writing in the Preschool–Third Grade classroom. Students will develop skills for standards-aligned lesson and unit planning through data-driven decisions and evidence-based practices.

EDUC 446. LITERACY AND ROBOTICS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 304; may be taken concurrently with EDUC 310.
This course builds on teacher candidates’ foundational knowledge of literacy instruction in the K–8 grade band, with a focus on integrating areas of literacy instruction within other content areas. Specifically, this course will examine the use of robotics to promote the development of K–8 students’ literacy skills, including reading, writing, and vocabulary.

EDUC 450. METHODS II: BLENDED CURRICULUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 410, EDUC 430, and concurrent enrollment in EDUC 451.
Building upon prerequisite coursework, this course will prepare students to use intentional teaching practices to deliver integrated curriculum content in the classroom (e.g., math, science, social studies, music, creative arts). Students will become skilled in the development and delivery of curriculum that is based on a strong foundational knowledge of typical child development, and child-centered, relationship-based practices.

EDUC 451. APPLICATIONS I: BLENDED CURRICULUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 410, EDUC 430 and concurrent enrollment in EDUC 450.
This is the first of two courses designed to provide opportunities for students to implement activities that increase their understanding of the Teaching Strategies Gold: Assessment Cycle in conjunction with implementation of early childhood curriculum content from ECE Methods I & II. Students are placed in high-quality ECE settings as determined by Washington state standards.

EDUC 452. TOPICS IN CONTINUING EDUCATION. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.

EDUC 454. SCIENCE METHODS FOR THE PRESCHOOL-THIRD GRADE CLASSROOM. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: concurrent enrollment in EDUC 344.
This course provides students with rich experiences in science education for ECE/ECSE classrooms. Course content is focused on inquiry-based approaches to developmentally appropriate big ideas in science. Students will develop skills for inquiry-based, standards-aligned lesson and unit planning.

EDUC 460. TRAUMA AND RESILIENCE IN EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 350.
This course focuses on partnerships within educational communities that foster resilience and restorative practice, including bullying and trauma-informed management. Connections to community organizations are emphasized. Panelists and guest lecturers will be highlighted. This course addresses risk and resilience, self-care, coping skills, and advanced methods in trauma-informed practice.

EDUC 461. SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS FOR THE PRESCHOOL-THIRD GRADE CLASSROOM. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 410 and EDUC 430.
This course provides students with rich experiences in social studies education for ECE/ECSE classrooms. Course content includes fundamental understandings of self, community, and civic engagement. Students will develop skills for standards-aligned lesson and unit planning while utilizing a variety of teaching strategies.

EDUC 462. INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY. 3 Credits.

Notes: Washington State Patrol and FBI fingerprinting clearance.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 304, may be taken concurrently.
This course investigates how to promote student learning by integrating technology with content and instructional methods. Students explore the use of internet-associated learning tools, multimedia authoring tools, assessment tools and data-analysis tools. The ethical underpinnings associated with instructional media are discussed throughout the course as is student-associated research in the area of instructional media and technology.

EDUC 463. PRODUCTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS. 5 Credits.

Notes: course fee.
This course will use the latest computer technology for teachers in all areas, librarians and media specialists. Producing presentations, creating graphs and charting, producing classroom newsletter publications, scanning documents and pictures, importing clip art, making color transparencies, video production and, evaluation of web page design are covered in this class.

EDUC 464. APPLICATIONS II: BLENDED CURRICULUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 451.
This is the second of two courses designed to provide opportunities for students to implement activities that increase their understanding of the Teaching Strategies Gold: Assessment Cycle in conjunction with implementation of early childhood curriculum content from ECE Methods I & II. Students continue in their previous placement from Applications I. This second course builds on content from Applications I with a focus on summarizing, planning and communicating results of child assessment.

EDUC 467. ENVIRONMENTAL AND SUSTAINABILITY EDUCATION (ESE) MICROCREDENTIAL. 1 Credit.

Notes: may be repeated for credit.
Pre-requisites: senior standing.
Students compile, share and reflect on their Environmental and Sustainability Education (ESE) experiences including ESE coursework, ESE volunteer experiences and ESE K-12 lessons plans and how they will be applied in the preK-12 classroom.

EDUC 470. DIVERSITY IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission into the education department.
This course is designed to provide an overview of issues pertaining to diversity in blended early childhood education. Through readings, assignments, online discussions, and personal and professional reflections students learn about topics related to working with diverse young children and their families based on the principles of Anti-Bias Education.

EDUC 475. PROMOTING SOCIAL COMPETENCE AND GUIDING BEHAVIOR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD SETTINGS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission into the ECE program.
This course prepares students to build rapport with children and their families; create supportive learning environments; demonstrate positive social-emotional teaching strategies; understand the function of behavior in preschool settings; define specific guidance strategies; assess challenging behaviors; develop universal positive guidance plans; and communicate the need for positive, consistent team approaches to including children with challenging behaviors.

EDUC 478. SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Washington State Patrol form submitted.
Develops instructional competencies in elementary school science through extensive laboratory experiences.

EDUC 479. EARLY LITERACY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to Teacher Education program.
This course teaches developmental and theoretical foundations for early literacy development beginning at birth, and supporting children with and without special needs. Students learn approaches for implementing evidence- and research-based early literacy practices for students to succeed in creating and managing a literacy-rich home-, classroom- and community environment. Students become reflective decision makers and competent pre-professionals.

EDUC 485. INDIGENOUS EDUCATION. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: IDST 485.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–global studies.
This course introduces students to the topic of indigenous education from a global perspective. Through readings, discussions, lectures and videos, students will examine the role education has played as an instrument of oppression, and how indigenous nations have restructured educational systems to reclaim their cultural identities and to empower themselves politically.

EDUC 488. PRACTICUM EDUCATIONAL STUDIES. 1-15 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
Pre-requisites: must be declared in the Educational Studies BA.
This is the student teaching practicum for the Educational Studie BA.

EDUC 489. FAMILY-CENTERED PRACTICES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission into the Education department.
This course addresses the knowledge and skills necessary for working with families of young children, with and without disabilities. It reviews the effect of adversity on families and strategies for delivering family-centered curriculum and intervention. It focuses on understanding and measuring family outcomes. The broad components include: understanding foundations of theory and policy; establishing effective partnerships; building family capacity through effective supports and service.

EDUC 490. LITERACY MAJOR CAPSTONE. 5 Credits.

Notes: EDUC 494 must be taken concurrently by Literacy, Reading, and Writing majors.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 303, EDUC 304, EDUC 308, EDUC 310, EDUC 338, EDUC 340, EDUC 380, EDUC 381.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–senior capstone.
This course has students utilize their literacy training as they interact with K–12 students to assess, plan, and implement literacy interventions in a tutoring clinic. During this service-based experience, students identify the connections among literacy instruction and politics, the economy, and social justice issues. In addition, students will develop a two-week reading curriculum for their placement practicum and review the Washington Teacher Competencies for the Reading Endorsements.

EDUC 490A. NATURAL RESOURCES CAPSTONE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–senior capstone.
This course allows pre-service teachers to team with natural resource community providers to actively engage in the work they do. Students develop inquiry activities for elementary classrooms around natural resource themes.

EDUC 490C. EARLY CHILDHOOD CAPSTONE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 464.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–senior capstone.
This course is designed to provide students with professional experiences and principles to guide their professional certification and practice in the field of early childhood education. The standards put forth by the National Association for the Education of Young Children, Division for Early Childhood, and WA professional competencies for P-3 certification will provide a framework for analyzing the professional issues applied, practiced and discussed.

EDUC 490E. CRITICAL THINKING IN TEACHING AND LEARNING. 4 Credits.

Notes: may be stacked with EDUC 592.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–senior capstone.
The study abroad program will provide a critical thinking perspective on education through a focus on science, social studies, and/or math, through exposure to coursework using the country’s cultural frames of reference. Students will be exposed to the community customs, language, education, and will contextualize their learning by linking it to local realities and a view of social justice and political context (including service learning).

EDUC 492. TRAUMA-INFORMED EDUCATION AND INTERVENTION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 350.
This course focuses on partnerships within educational communities that foster resilience and restorative practice. Connections to community organizations are emphasized. Panelists and guest lecturers will be highlighted. This course addresses risk and resilience, self-care, coping skills, and advanced methods in trauma-informed practice. Candidates develop a portfolio for future practice.

EDUC 494. LITERACY SEMINAR AND PRACTICUM. 3 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 338; EDUC 386A; EDUC 490 must be taken concurrently.
In this practicum for literacy majors, candidates are supervised while teaching literacy in a K–12 classroom setting. This course must be taken before student teaching. Students must spend six hours per week, five days per week, during literacy instruction in a public school classroom.

EDUC 495. PRACTICUM. 5 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

EDUC 495A. EDUCATION INTERNSHIP FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
This course is part of the three-quarter field based requirement for students in the P-3 Certificate Program. Students spend 8 hours in the field and take this course concurrently with EDUC 498 (1) Seminar.

EDUC 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSES. 1-18 Credits.

EDUC 497. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-18 Credits.

Electives. Major in Reading (Elementary); must be a reading workshop.

EDUC 498. SEMINAR. 1-18 Credits.

EDUC 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-18 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
An opportunity for students with adequate background and experience to make intensive and independent study of some special problems in education.

EDUC 500. FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION/MIT. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the fundamentals of K-12 education, school systems and teaching. Role of schools in a democratic society is analyzed to help pre-service teachers become familiar with the reflective thinking necessary to be an effective classroom teacher, and become familiar with the historical and legal foundations of education as they apply to teaching.

EDUC 502. HISTORY OF AMERICAN EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

The economic, social, cultural and philosophical development of America and the resulting impact on schools.

EDUC 503. CONTEMPORARY EDUCATION IN OTHER SOCIETIES. 4 Credits.

Study of systems of education outside the United States.

EDUC 505. CURRENT ISSUES IN EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

Issues such as federal aid, teachers' tenure, teachers' salaries, the political control of education, indoctrination versus education, religious and public education, school-district reorganization, the community-centered school and academic freedom.

EDUC 506. EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY. 4 Credits.

An analysis of American democratic ideology in relation to major social problems such as race, social stratification, leisure, population movements, family life, and the involvement of the public schools.

EDUC 507. PHILOSOPHY AND ORGANIZATION OF THE AMERICAN SCHOOL. 4 Credits.

Four philosophies in education will be studied. The implications of each for school organization and classroom instruction will be examined. Participants will be invited to analyze their beliefs and how these beliefs form into a coherent philosophy of education.

EDUC 508. UNDERSTANDING LITERACY INSTRUCTION K-8. 6 Credits.

Teacher candidates gain knowledge and understanding of reading processes, emergent through advanced literacy learning across the K-8 curriculum, lesson plan development based upon assessment, and how to manage classroom literacy instruction.

EDUC 510. CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT. 4 Credits.

In this course MIT students will gain understanding of best practice in curriculum development and asseessment as well as enhanced competence in application of the practice.

EDUC 514. HEALTH BASICS. 4 Credits.

This course is designed to be an introductory health and wellness class that provides a broad overview of a number of topics that specifically focus on living a healthy, physically active lifestyle. Students will also learn about current health issues and teaching strategies for optimal delivery of health education content.

EDUC 517. THE CULTURE OF MIDDLE LEVEL SCHOOL. 3 Credits.

This course will promote awareness and understanding of middle school aged students, of the philosophy and organization of middle level schools and programs, and of developmentally appropriate instructional and classroom management strategies for teaching middle level learners.

EDUC 518. TESOL/ELL APPLIED LINGUISTICS. 4 Credits.

This course provides a linguistics foundation and pedagogical application of aspects of the English language including phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Contrastive analysis of learners’ languages is included as well as discourse analysis within and across contexts and cultures. Challenges that learners face are addressed through multimodal materials. Learners reflect on their language learning and literacy events across languages.

EDUC 519. SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION. 4 Credits.

The course provides various theoretical perspectives of second language acquisition, similarities and differences in first and second language acquisition and in child and adult second language acquisition, basic psycholinguistic theory, particularly the role of the brain, memory, and language universals in language acquisition, and both the cognitive and affective domains and cultural influences with analysis of how these impact performance, motivation, and learning in the ESL classroom.

EDUC 520. METHODS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH. 4 Credits.

Required of all graduate students pursuing the master of education degree program unless an alternative research course is scheduled. It provides the background of research methods and techniques necessary for meeting the requirements of Education 600 or 601. The methods, tools, and strategies used in educational research, both quantitative and qualitative, will be explored. Continued level teacher certification research requirements may be met through this course.

EDUC 522. TRANSFORMATION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING. 4 Credits.

This course focuses on reforming and transforming the processes, perceptions and practices of learning and teaching by emphasizing diversity, social justice and equity. First, psychological principles underlying current educational culture will be analyzed. Second, reforming relationships, interactions and contexts for learning will be addressed through reflective practices, and third, rethinking and transforming connections, will be viewed through the lens of learners of diverse backgrounds.

EDUC 523. TESOL/ELL TEACHING METHODS AND MATERIALS. 4 Credits.

Major 20th and 21st century language teaching methods, strategies, and approaches. Theory and practice in designing, Major 20th and 21st century language teaching methods, strategies, and approaches. Theory and practice in designing, developing, and evaluating ESL or EFL materials for English language learners of different ages and settings.

EDUC 524. PEDAGOGICAL ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 4 Credits.

Review and in-depth study of English grammar and teaching approaches for multilingual and multicultural English language learners in the United States and in other countries. Application of syntax, stylistics, rhetoric, pragmatics and sociolinguistics for teachers’ knowledge base. Review of relevant composition research and theory.

EDUC 525. RESEARCH METHODS FOR EDUCATIONAL SETTINGS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admission to an M.Ed. program.
The purpose of this course is to teach students to consume and conduct single-case and single-subject research in educational and community settings. Students will gain an understanding of the conceptual background underlying this research approach. Students will also learn about the historical background of the development of these design approaches, basic logistical barriers to and solutions for carrying out research in applied settings, and the procedures of carrying out such research.

EDUC 526. INTRODUCTION TO MULTI-TIERED SYSTEMS OF SUPPORT. 4 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to teach students how to build a school wide multi-tiered system of support (MTSS). The MTSS framework encompasses tiered systems such as response to intervention (RTI) and positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS), and is designed to help all K–12 students succeed. Students will learn about effective instruction, the role of school teams, implementation in action, assessment, problem solving and data-based decision making.

EDUC 527. SKILL ACQUISITION AND PERFORMANCE IN PE. 4 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the structures and functions the organic, skeletal, and neuromuscular systems of the human body contribute to motor performance. In tandem, students will be provided tools for designing and delivering effective instruction as well as assessing performance that will optimize skill acquisition and performance.

EDUC 528. ADVOCACY, PROMOTION AND PROGRAMMING IN HPED. 4 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the importance of programming beyond the classroom as well as the need for promoting and advocating for your health and physical education programs. In tandem, students will be exposed to basic grant writing guidelines and fundraising strategies.

EDUC 529. SEMINAR IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of topics and trends related to teaching Health and Physical Education through an in-depth analysis, synthesis, and discussion through readings and other activities.

EDUC 533. INSTRUCTIONAL SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT. 4 Credits.

Advanced techniques and methods of developing and utilizing instructional systems. A multimedia correlated system will be designed, produced, organized, field tested and presented.

EDUC 538. MEDIA LITERACY FOR TEACHERS. 4 Credits.

Focuses on curricular and instructional development of resource-based skills. From examining model K-12 programs for skills in such areas as information, critical television viewing, media production, visual literacy, teachers will apply elements of instructional design and development to resource-based skills programs.

EDUC 539. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: may be graded Pass/No Credit.

EDUC 542. P-12 LITERATURE STUDY IN THE CLASSROOM. 4 Credits.

Advanced study of literature based teaching. Explores ways of building a literate classroom by connecting children and books with special ways on supporting students in becoming fluent readers. Understand how to select and adapt instructional content, including technology-based materials. Demonstrate knowledge of the range of genre, text types, and text language in classic and contemporary children’s and young adult literature.

EDUC 544. ADVANCED READING METHODS ACROSS THE CURRICULUM. 4 Credits.

A course designed to provide classroom teachers an opportunity to revisit current reading pedagogical knowledge, including knowledge of essential components of reading (phonics, word recognition, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension), phonological awareness, print concepts, and academic language. Students will explore meaningful ways in which reading instruction may be infused and integrated within content areas of the curriculum, including Common Core State Standards. Teacher assessment and student self-assessment as means to inform teaching and learning will be an additional focus of the course.

EDUC 547. ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

The primary focus of this course is for students to learn to demonstrate and teach basic motor skills, which are first taught at the elementary level. These skills are then built upon at the secondary level. Students are also introduced to the basics of physical function/development of children, a wide range of appropriate physical activities, and teaching objectives/methods in elementary physical education.

EDUC 548. SECONDARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

In this course students will learn to perform, demonstrate, teach skills and progressive methods and use assessments in teaching physical education at the secondary level (middle and high school). Students will explore meaningful ways to incorporate the three learning domains into lessons. Teacher assessment and student self-assessment as means to inform teaching and learning will be an additional focus of the course.

EDUC 551. SUPERVISION OF INSTRUCTION. 4 Credits.

The work of the teacher or supervisor in improving instruction.

EDUC 552. SUPERVISION OF STUDENT TEACHING. 4 Credits.

Preparation for positions as supervisors in laboratory schools and for public school teachers who supervise students in off-campus student teaching assignments.

EDUC 553. THEORY AND PRACTICE IN CURRICULUM STUDIES. 4 Credits.

This course emphasizes the key philosophical, sociological, and historical intellectual contributions in the field of curriculum. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of school curriculum through the analysis of historical events and current research.

EDUC 554. CURRICULAR DESIGN AND EVALUATION. 4 Credits.

This course examines the principles underlying the development of a K-12 school curriculum. With an emphasis on methods of determining curriculum priorities, objectives, scope and sequence, and organizational patterns, as well as an examination of how curriculum design facilitates student-learning opportunities.

EDUC 560. READING INQUIRY. 4 Credits.

This course centers on theoretical and evidence-based research into reading and literacy instruction. The course is based on the inquiry cycle, which will provide the organizational structure for class participation. An emphasis on topics related to current research in the field of literacy, including collegial practices. Class sessions will include small group brainstorming and discussion, reading, explorations, browsing, workshop experiences, presentations, and teaching demonstrations.

EDUC 561. INFORMATION AND RESOURCE LITERACY. 4 Credits.

Students will investigate concepts and tools of the information problem-solving process in a digital world, including process models, digital citizenship, and online resources. Students will demonstrate their understanding of relevant concepts and resources through discussion, responses to information inquiry case studies, and the creation of a technology-enhanced lesson plan.

EDUC 562. MEDIA COLLECTION MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

In this course, students will learn about collection development policies and procedures, and about sources of information for evaluation and acquisition of print and nonprint materials. Students will learn how to evaluate, select and maintain resources to provide library collections that are integral to the educational goals of the school.

EDUC 563. SCHOOL LAW (MIT). 2 Credits.

In this course MIT students will become familiar with applicable school law, preventive measures and knowledge of seeking legal advice.

EDUC 564. SCHOOL LAW. 4 Credits.

Court decisions and statutory law relating to the duties and powers of school officials and employees, compulsory school attendance, school census, child labor, control, and organization.

EDUC 565. LEADERSHIP FOR TODAY'S SCHOOLS. 4 Credits.

Focus on school leadership, developing with vision the knowledge and skills for strategically leading the planning, decision-making, communication, management, and change processes needed in 21st century schools and communities.

EDUC 566. LEADERSHIP IN SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS. 4 Credits.

A problem-based exposure to the multi-dimensional role of school-community relations and communication in school districts. The course addresses the Public Relations domain of the NPBEA and WAC standards for the principalship.

EDUC 567. SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND BUDGET. 4 Credits.

Notes: requirement for Principal Certification Program and M.Ed. with Leadership emphasis.
Students will examine the role of the principal, using the PSEL Standards as a framework. They will prepare themselves for leadership through research, discussion activity and application. Relevant and practical topics will be used to create the curricular content of the course. School budget and finance basics will be introduced, studied and discussed.

EDUC 568. TECHNOLOGY-EMBEDDED INSTRUCTION. 4 Credits.

In this course, future librarians will demonstrate teaching skills in literacy, collaboration, and integrating information literacy with content curriculum. Students will design lesson plans and a unit that use standards in the content areas, as well as the standards for school librarians and technology literacy standards. Future librarians will also consider ways that students access technology, including the digital divide and collaborative tools.

EDUC 569. LIBRARIAN LEADERSHIP AND ADMINISTRATION. 4 Credits.

In this course, teacher-librarians will learn leadership and administrator skills. This knowledge will then influence student learning within the educational community. Students gain an understanding of the role the library plays in a democratic society. Other focused leadership topics include development, implementation, and evaluation of the school library media program, alongside the management of personnel, information systems, resources, and facilities.

EDUC 570. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE PROGRAMS. 4 Credits.

The development of elementary school science programs and materials including the coordination of science instruction with other curricular areas.

EDUC 571. COLLABORATIVE CONTENT INTEGRATION. 4 Credits.

In this course, students will work with information standards, school goals, and objectives in mind to develop collaborative relationships within the school and community. The teacher librarian will deliver integrated instruction, reading advocacy, and information services while working with content area teachers. Students will write lesson plans that integrate informational literacy outcomes for students, including finding multiple and varied resources.

EDUC 572. MATHEMATICS AND QUANTITATIVE REASONING IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: admittance to the MIT program.
This course combines elementary and middle school mathematics content with research based methods and strategies in order to prepare students to effectively teach rigorous, developmentally appropriate mathematics in kindergarten through eighth grade classrooms. This course is designed to give students an understanding of how children progress in their mathematical thinking and learning and how to facilitate high quality learning experiences.

EDUC 574. SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 4 Credits.

Place of social studies in the school program, the development of principles involved in the teaching of social studies.

EDUC 576. ADVANCED LITERACY METHODS. 4 Credits.

Advanced course with emphasis on models for reading, writing and language arts integration. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the interrelationships of reading, writing, listening and speaking. Students demonstrate knowledge of how to integrate a variety of classroom-based materials, using a wide-range of curriculum materials and instructional strategies. Know how to plan systematic instruction using Common Core State Standards and current literacy research to guide instruction. Cover total program: management, methods, materials and techniques.

EDUC 580. CURRICULUM DESIGN IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor.
An in-depth study of the components of early childhood education curriculum, curriculum models and research regarding early childhood education programs.

EDUC 581. THE SCIENCE OF EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT: RISK AND RESILIENCE. 4 Credits.

This course covers early childhood development (birth – 8), which includes the impact of prenatal, as well as social and societal influences. Students will learn about brain development, and how risk and protective factors can impact social-emotional, physical and cognitive growth in young children.

EDUC 582. CURRICULUM AND PRACTICE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

This course will focus on classical and contemporary issues in early childhood education (birth – 8). Five larger domains (i.e., stakeholders in ECE, differentiation, standards, and curricula) will be examined through selected readings.

EDUC 583. THE INTENTIONAL TEACHER. 4 Credits.

Course content will provide a framework for early childhood professionals to plan, deliver and assess, evidence-based, integrated curriculum content in the early childhood classroom (e.g., math, science, social studies, music, creative arts).

EDUC 584. POSITIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS FOR YOUNG CHILDREN. 4 Credits.

This course prepares students to create a positive climate for young children. The quality of learning environments will be examined with regard to both the social and physical design and layout. Students will explore the function of behavior and define preventative strategies in early childhood home and classroom settings.

EDUC 585. FAMILY ENGAGEMENT, SYSTEMS AND THEORY. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: requires admission into the ECE emphasis area of the MEd.
This course is based on an understanding of family systems and the application of family-centered principles in early childhood education and home-based services. Students will gain an understanding of family and cultural contexts in which child development occurs and explore service delivery models and frameworks for supporting a collaborative partnership with families.

EDUC 586. EARLY CHILDHOOD LEADERSHIP, POLICY AND PRACTICE. 4 Credits.

This course will require students to think critically about the evolution of policies, programs, and practices in early care and education. Students will apply perspectives to current practice and policy through critical analysis of research, and program evaluation.

EDUC 588. READINGS IN THE CURRICULUM. 1-4 Credits.

An advanced course for students wanting to study the current literature on school curriculum development and offerings. Students will develop an annotated bibliography from a specific area of school curriculum.

EDUC 590. CRITICAL AND SOCIAL LITERACIES. 4 Credits.

An advanced course for students wanting to study current literature on literacy as practiced in a variety of social contexts, as evaluated through a number of critical perspectives. Developing practitioners reflect and discuss the importance of respecting socio-economic, cultural, linguistic and ethnic diversity in the teaching process. Demonstrate knowledge that students’ interests, literacy skills and funds of knowledge are always considered and integrated within literacy practices. Instructional implications will be highlighted so students will develop reflective and sound classroom practice.

EDUC 591. INSTRUCTIONAL FOUNDATIONS AND INTERVENTIONS FOR LITERACY DIFFICULTIES. 4 Credits.

This course is designed to examine the causes and correlates of individual differences in reading ability. Knowledge of foundations of phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, pragmatics and orthography. Integration and analysis of multiple assessment tools and knowledge of the assessment/instruction cycle (data analysis, universal screening, diagnostic, progress monitoring, formative, summative), and how to use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate evidence-based literacy instruction. Specialized, intensive approaches for the improvement of the literacy skills will be examined. Reflection will include the influence and impact on literacy for English Language Learners, special needs students, and struggling readers.

EDUC 592. SUPERVISED PRACTICUM LITERACY. 4 Credits.

Supervised practicum experience working with students who are enrolled in the department's student literacy program.

EDUC 594. PSYCHOLOGY OF LITERACY. 4 Credits.

Application of the findings of psychology to understanding the reading, writing, and communication processes and the teaching of literacy.

EDUC 596. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-6 Credits.

EDUC 597. WORKSHOP, SHORT COURSE, CONFERENCE, SEMINAR. 1-6 Credits.

Notes: only one workshop course for up to 3 credits may be used to fulfill graduate degree requirements.

EDUC 598. SEMINAR IN EDUCATION. 1-12 Credits.

EDUC 599. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Students with adequate background and experience make intensive and independent study of some special problems in education. Students should make arrangements through their graduate adviser.

EDUC 600. THESIS. 1-8 Credits.

Notes: may be graded Pass/No Credit.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 520; permission of the instructor, department chair and
college dean. Independent research study under the direction of a graduate advisory committee.

EDUC 601. RESEARCH REPORT. 1-6 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Enrollees should have completed a rough draft prior to entering the course. Research projects to be developed and written by graduates.

EDUC 616. TESOL/ELL INTERNSHIP I. 2 Credits.

Teaching or tutoring experience in speaking and listening by working with speaker/s of a language other than English.

EDUC 617. TESOL/ELL INTERNSHIP II. 2 Credits.

Teaching or tutoring experience in speaking and listening by working with speaker/s of a language other than English.

EDUC 618. TESOL/ELL PORTFOLIO. 2 Credits.

In this course, students will be able to create an e-portfolio that includes pieces of their work from courses throughout their MEd or Graduate Certificate programs with the TESOL or ELL Option.

EDUC 619. TESOL/ELL COMPREHENSIVE EXAM. 3 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to assess the knowledge and skills attained during the course of graduate study in the Master of Education program. The comprehensive exam requires students to integrate the principals, concepts, and research methodologies when employing academic language and using a formal writing style.

EDUC 620. ETHICS, EQUITY AND LEADERSHIP. 4 Credits.

This course explores ethical leadership as well as its relation to equity, inclusion, and social justice. Content considered will be leadership and its impact and relationship with the diversity of communities, employees, and student bodies. Students will examine their own self-awareness and understanding of the interactions and intersections of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, religion, family structure contexts and culture.

EDUC 621. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION INTERNSHIP I. 2 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
Practical, on-the-job experience for specialized school personnel planned cooperatively by a school district and the university. Students are selected for this experience by the university and the district in which the student is working. To register, students must make application to the program advisor during May of the previous year.

EDUC 622. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION INTERNSHIP II. 2 Credits.

Notes: Graded Pass/Fail. To register, students must make application to the program advisor during May of the previous year.
Continuation of C & I Internship I. Practical, on-the-job experience for specialized school personnel planned cooperatively by a school district and the university. Students are selected for this experience by the university and the district in which the student is working.

EDUC 623. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION PORTFOLIO. 2 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
This course provides MEd candidates the opportunity to assemble a portfolio of work from graduate education courses that includes a reflective component. Candidates will provide evidence aligned with corresponding professional competencies. The course provides candidates the opportunity to prepare for the written comprehensive examination, which serves as the capstone experience in lieu of a thesis or research report.

EDUC 624. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION COMPREHENSIVE EXAM. 3 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to assess the knowledge and skills attained during the course of graduate study in the Master of Education program. The comprehensive exam requires students to integrate the principals, concepts, and research methodologies when employing academic language and using a formal writing style.

EDUC 625. LEADERSHIP THEORY AND CHANGE. 4 Credits.

This course provides a theoretical foundation for the development of personal and professional leadership style grounded in leadership theory. Students will examine leadership theory as they consider how these principles relate to their leadership style. Theoretical and philosophical perspectives will be analyzed and used to support students as they develop their professional practice of leadership.

EDUC 626. THEORY AND POLICY: CHALLENGES OF PRACTICE. 4 Credits.

This course considers the political connections and relationships within and between organizations, with communities, and local, state, and national systems of government. In this course, students will study theory and research around public policy to examine and investigate problems of practice through the use of case studies. Application of learning will be through the development of solutions to problems of practice.

EDUC 627. LEADERSHIP AND DATA-INFORMED DECISION MAKING. 4 Credits.

This course examines how data can be used to inform decisions made to support the visions, missions, and goals of organizations. Included will be how to identify relevant data, the analysis of data, and how to use data to inform decisions and make recommendations for change.

EDUC 628. LEADERSHIP IN SUPERVISION. 4 Credits.

This foundational course examines the concept of supervision through the lens of leadership. Leadership conduct is understood to integrate an organization’s shared vision by reviewing, analyzing, and distributing plans supported by stakeholders which is used to secure maintained improvement. Students will use this understanding to support and manage the human resources of an organization to ensure successful operations.

EDUC 629. SUPERVISION AND HUMAN RESOURCES. 4 Credits.

This course familiarizes students with the concept of supervision within the organization of human resources. Students will learn supervisory approaches from an ethnocentric perspective of supervisory behaviors so to develop reflective practices for addressing the responsibilities within human resources. As the course examines the types of supervisory approaches, students will explore the allocation of resources, function of policies and procedures, and employee retention and unionism.

EDUC 630. BUILDING PARTNERSHIPS FOR SYSTEMIC CHANGE. 4 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to demonstrate partnerships’ crucial role in systemic change for procuring successful outcomes in educational contexts. Complex theoretical implications ground the nature of partnerships in the course. Students will engage with strategies for alliance building and advocacy to strengthen the effectiveness of the partnerships.

EDUC 631. EARLY CHILDHOOD INTERNSHIP I. 2 Credits.

Notes: Graded Pass/Fail. To register, students must make application to the program advisor during May of the previous year.
Practical, on-the-job experience for specialized school personnel planned cooperatively by a school district and the university. Students are selected for this experience by the university and the district in which the student is working.

EDUC 632. EARLY CHILDHOOD INTERNSHIP II. 2 Credits.

Notes: Graded Pass/Fail. To register, students must make application to the program advisor during May of the previous year.
Continuation of Early Childhood Internship I. Practical, on-the-job experience for specialized school personnel planned cooperatively by a school district and the university. Students are selected for this experience by the university and the district in which the student is working.

EDUC 633. EARLY CHILDHOOD PORTFOLIO. 2 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
This course provides MEd candidates the opportunity to assemble a portfolio of work from graduate education courses that includes a reflective component. Candidates will provide evidence aligned with corresponding professional competencies. The course provides candidates the opportunity to prepare for the written comprehensive examination, which serves as the capstone experience in lieu of a thesis or research report.

EDUC 634. EARLY CHILDHOOD COMPREHENSIVE EXAM. 3 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to assess the knowledge and skills attained during the course of graduate study in the Master of Education program. The comprehensive exam requires students to integrate the principals, concepts, and research methodologies when employing academic language and using a formal writing style.

EDUC 635. LAW AND PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 629.
This course is designed to provide students with ethical and legal parameters around leadership responsibilities in personnel management. Students will use research and data to develop and implement an organization-level system for hiring, retention, development, and supervision. Students will study laws affecting their roles as leaders.

EDUC 636. IMPROVING STUDENT LEARNING. 4 Credits.

This course prepares leaders in higher education and school districts in the process of curriculum adoption, implementation, and assessment in the teaching, and learning processes. Addressed in this course are the knowledge and skills, roles, behaviors, and beliefs leaders need as they guide their organizations. The use of data will be considered for improvement both at the instructional and system-wide levels.

EDUC 637. SOCIAL JUSTICE IN K-12 AND HIGHER EDUCATION LEADERSHIP. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 620.
This course provides leaders in K–12 and higher education a social justice lens to apply as they analyze and evaluate issues related to leadership, technology, values, equity, diversity, digital citizenship, and community. Students will develop a plan to cultivate and advocate for a supportive social justice culture.

EDUC 638. SYSTEMS AND ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT. 4 Credits.

This course provides information around understanding operational systems including evaluation, communication, implementation, and equitable access. Students will learn governance and systems management in relation to the mission, vision, and goals of a school district.

EDUC 639. LEADERSHIP, THEORY AND POLICY IN K-12 AND HIGHER EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 626.
In this course, students will examine leadership theory and policy in K–12 and higher education. This examination will include leadership theory, current events, policy-laws, and leadership reactions to these situations. In addition. the course will focus on trauma-informed practice, culturally responsive and equitable instruction and practices, and leadership ability to advocate for and evaluate these practices.

EDUC 640. ADMINISTRATION, BUDGET AND FINANCE. 4 Credits.

This course examines the processing of resource requests and plans, budgets, purchases, and accounting as relating to both K–12 and higher education institutes. Students will evaluate data to determine financial needs from which they will create and implement equitable resourcing plans.

EDUC 641. LITERACY INTERNSHIP I. 2 Credits.

Notes: Graded Pass/Fail. To register, students must make application to the program advisor during May of the previous year.
Practical, on-the-job experience for specialized school personnel planned cooperatively by a school district and the university. Students are selected for this experience by the university and the district in which the student is working.

EDUC 642. LITERACY INTERNSHIP II. 2 Credits.

Notes: Graded Pass/Fail. To register, students must make application to the program advisor during May of the previous year.
Continuation of Literacy Internship I. Practical, on-the-job experience for specialized school personnel planned cooperatively by a school district and the university. Students are selected for this experience by the university and the district in which the student is working.

EDUC 643. LITERACY PORTFOLIO. 2 Credits.

Notes: Graded Pass/Fail. Must be completed after all other coursework has been completed, but before, or concurrently, with the comprehensive exam.
This course provides MEd candidates the opportunity to assemble a portfolio of work from graduate education courses that includes a reflective component. Candidates will provide evidence aligned with corresponding professional competencies. The course provides candidates the opportunity to prepare for the written comprehensive examination, which serves as the capstone experience in lieu of a thesis or research report.

EDUC 644. LITERACY COMPREHENSIVE EXAM. 3 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to assess the knowledge and skills attained during the course of graduate study in the Master of Education program. The comprehensive exam requires students to integrate the principals, concepts, and research methodologies when employing academic language and using a formal writing style.

EDUC 645. LIBRARY MEDIA INTERNSHIP I. 2 Credits.

In this course, students will demonstrate understanding of librarianship in the K–12 setting by completing several hands-on activities throughout the course of an internship at a school library. Students will work with a mentor librarian and by the end of this course, be able to use theory and common practices to conceptualize library use in physical and virtual spaces. In addition, students will have an opportunity to review a library media specialist’s role in collaboration with stakeholders.

EDUC 646. LIBRARY MEDIA INTERNSHIP II. 2 Credits.

In this course, students will demonstrate understanding of librarianship in the K–12 setting by completing several hands-on activities throughout the course of an internship at a school library. Students will work with a mentor librarian and by the end of this course, be able to use theory and common practices to conceptualize library use in physical and virtual spaces. In addition, students will have an opportunity to review a library media specialist’s role in collaboration with stakeholders.

EDUC 647. LIBRARY MEDIA PORTFOLIO. 2 Credits.

In this course, students will be able to create an e-portfolio that contains pieces of their work from courses throughout their library media MEd program and/or certificate. Students should be able to refer back to this portfolio as they seek jobs, or as a resource once they are in a classroom teaching. Each of the components that students are required to include in this portfolio are integral to be a skilled library media educator and each component aligns with the program level objectives.

EDUC 648. LIBRARY MEDIA COMPREHENSIVE EXAM. 3 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to assess the knowledge and skills attained during the course of graduate study in the Master of Education program. The comprehensive exam requires students to integrate the principals, concepts, and research methodologies when employing academic language and using a formal writing style.

EDUC 651. LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP I. 2 Credits.

Notes: Graded Pass/Fail. To register, students must make application to the program advisor during May of the previous year.
Practical, on-the-job experience for specialized school personnel planned cooperatively by a school district and the university. Students are selected for this experience by the university and the district in which the student is working.

EDUC 652. LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP II. 2 Credits.

Notes: Graded Pass/Fail. To register, students must make application to the program advisor during May of the previous year.
Continuation of Leadership Internship I. Practical, on-the-job experience for specialized school personnel planned cooperatively by a school district and the university. Students are selected for this experience by the university and the district in which the student is working.

EDUC 653. LEADERSHIP PORTFOLIO. 2 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
This course provides MEd candidates the opportunity to assemble a portfolio of work from graduate education courses that includes a reflective component. Candidates will provide evidence aligned with corresponding professional competencies. The course provides candidates the opportunity to prepare for the written comprehensive examination, which serves as the capstone experience in lieu of a thesis or research report.

EDUC 654. LEADERSHIP COMPREHENSIVE EXAM. 3 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to assess the knowledge and skills attained during the course of graduate study in the Master of Education program. The comprehensive exam requires students to integrate the principals, concepts, and research methodologies when employing academic language and using a formal writing style.

EDUC 655. INTERNSHIP IN HEALTH EDUCATION. 2 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to provide information and activities on the foundation of K–12 health standards-based programming, curriculum, and instruction designed to for the purpose of instilling healthy behaviors in all learners. Health Education instructors need to demonstrate an understanding of health education content, health literacy skills, digital literacy skills, theoretical foundations of behavior change and learning, and applicable for all abilities.

EDUC 656. INTERNSHIP IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 2 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to provide information and activities on the foundation of K–12 standards-based programming, curriculum, and instruction designed to assist students in pursing lifelong healthy living. Physical Education instructors needs to have core knowledge and skills regarding how best to meet the movement needs of not only competent movers but be a resource for all abilities.

EDUC 657. HEALTH AND PHYSICAL ED PORTFOLIO. 2 Credits.

In this course, students will be able to create an e-portfolio that contains pieces of their work throughout their health and physical education courses in the M.Ed. program. This online portfolio will demonstrate students’ competency in content and skill as a health and physical educator. Students will be able to refer back to this portfolio as they seek jobs, or as a resource once they are in the HPED setting.

EDUC 658. HEALTH AND PHYSICAL ED COMPREHENSIVE EXAM. 3 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to assess the knowledge and skills attained during the course of graduate study in the Master of Education program. The comprehensive exam requires students to integrate the principals, concepts, and research methodologies when employing academic language and using a formal writing style.

EDUC 660. PRINCIPAL INTERNSHIP AND PORTFOLIO I. 2 Credits.

Notes: to register, students must send verification of placement to advisor at least one quarter before beginning internship.
During this course candidates gain practical, on-the-job, experience while assembling a portfolio of work demonstrating that they have met all required competencies for the professional program. Candidates must apply for, and be accepted by, the university and district at least two terms before beginning their internship.

EDUC 661. PRINCIPAL INTERNSHIP AND PORTFOLIO II. 2 Credits.

Notes: to register, students must send verification of placement to advisor at least one quarter before beginning internship.
During this course candidates gain practical, on-the-job, experience while assembling a portfolio of work demonstrating that they have met all required competencies for the professional program. Candidates must apply for, and be accepted by, the university and district at least two terms before beginning their internship.

EDUC 662. PRINCIPAL INTERNSHIP AND PORTFOLIO III. 2 Credits.

Notes: to register, students must send verification of placement to advisor at least one quarter before beginning internship.
During this course candidates gain practical, on-the-job, experience while assembling a portfolio of work demonstrating that they have met all required competencies for the professional program. Candidates must apply for, and be accepted by, the university and district at least two terms before beginning their internship.

EDUC 663. PRINCIPAL INTERNSHIP AND PORTFOLIO IV. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 661.
During this course candidates gain practical, on-the-job, experience while assembling a portfolio of work demonstrating that they have met all required competencies for the professional program. Candidates must apply for, and be accepted by, the university and district at least two terms before beginning their internship.

EDUC 664. PRINCIPAL INTERNSHIP AND PORTFOLIO V. 2 Credits.

During this course candidates gain practical, on-the-job, experience while assembling a portfolio of work demonstrating that they have met all required competencies for the professional program. Candidates must apply for, and be accepted by, the university and district at least two terms before beginning their internship.

EDUC 665. PRINCIPAL INTERNSHIP AND PORTFOLIO VI. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 663.
During this course candidates gain practical, on-the-job, experience while assembling a portfolio of work demonstrating that they have met all required competencies for the professional program. Candidates must apply for, and be accepted by, the university and district at least two terms before beginning their internship.

EDUC 667. PRINCIPAL COMPREHENSIVE EXAM. 1 Credit.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to assess the knowledge and skills attained during the course of graduate study in the Master of Education program. The comprehensive exam requires students to integrate the principals, concepts, and research methodologies when employing academic language and using a formal writing style.

EDUC 670. PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR INTERNSHIP AND PORTFOLIO I. 2 Credits.

Notes: to register, students must send verification of placement to advisor at least two terms before beginning internship.
During this course candidates gain practical, on-the-job, experience while assembling a portfolio of work demonstrating that they have met all required competencies for the professional program. Candidates must apply for, and be accepted by, the university and district at least two terms before beginning their internship.

EDUC 671. PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR INTERNSHIP AND PORTFOLIO II. 2 Credits.

Notes: Continuation of Administrator Internship I. To register, students must send verification of placement to advisor at least two terms before beginning internship.
During this course candidates gain practical, on-the-job, experience while assembling a portfolio of work demonstrating that they have met all required competencies for the professional program. Candidates must apply for, and be accepted by, the university and district at least two terms before beginning their internship.

EDUC 672. PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR INTERNSHIP AND PORTFOLIO III. 2 Credits.

Notes: Continuation of Internship I and II. To register, students must send verification of placement to advisor at least one quarter before beginning internship.
During this course candidates gain practical, on-the-job, experience while assembling a portfolio of work demonstrating that they have met all required competencies for the professional program. Candidates must apply for, and be accepted by, the university and district at least two terms before beginning their internship.

EDUC 673. PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR INTERNSHIP AND PORTFOLIO IV. 2 Credits.

During this course candidates gain practical, on-the-job, experience while assembling a portfolio of work demonstrating that they have met all required competencies for the professional program. Candidates must apply for, and be accepted by, the university and district at least two terms before beginning their internship.

EDUC 674. PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR INTERNSHIP AND PORTFOLIO V. 2 Credits.

During this course candidates gain practical, on-the-job, experience while assembling a portfolio of work demonstrating that they have met all required competencies for the professional program. Candidates must apply for, and be accepted by, the university and district at least two terms before beginning their internship.

EDUC 675. PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR INTERNSHIP AND PORTFOLIO VI. 2 Credits.

During this course candidates gain practical, on-the-job, experience while assembling a portfolio of work demonstrating that they have met all required competencies for the professional program. Candidates must apply for, and be accepted by, the university and district at least two terms before beginning their internship.

EDUC 676. PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAM. 1 Credit.

Notes: graded Pass/Fail.
The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to assess the knowledge and skills attained during the course of graduate study in the Master of Education program. The comprehensive exam requires students to integrate the principals, concepts, and research methodologies when employing academic language and using a formal writing style.

EDUC 680. INTRODUCTION TO QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH. 4 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to quantitative research methods. Students will review quantitative design, philosophy, and nature of quantitative research. Students will read quantitative designs and articles. Issues such as theoretical frameworks, interview survey data collection and analysis, objectivity, ethics, and quantitative designs. Students will use SPSS or other data analysis software to analyze and interpret data.

EDUC 681. INTRODUCTION TO QUALITATIVE RESEARCH. 4 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to qualitative research methods. Students will review the foundations of qualitative design, investigate the history, philosophy, and nature of qualitative research. Students will read qualitative designs and articles. In addition, the course will involve an introduction to issues such as theoretical frameworks, interview data collection, objectivity, ethics, and qualitative designs.

EDUC 682. INTRODUCTION TO MIXED METHODS AND PROBLEM OF PRACTICE RESEARCH. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: EDUC 680 and EDUC 681.
This course serves to introduce students to mixed methods and action research designs. Through reading, writing, critiquing, and analyzing both types of research, students will broaden their knowledge of research.

EDUC 683. APPLIED PROBLEM OF PRACTICE I. 2 Credits.

Notes: part one of a three part series.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 682.
In this course, action research methodologies will be used to create a systematic plan for implementing the first stages of their research or project. Students will finalize plans for implementing action research focusing on a problem of practice in their environment. In this class, students will outline their method, plan, and propose to a committee a plan implementation.

EDUC 684. APPLIED PROBLEM OF PRACTICE II. 2 Credits.

Notes: part two of a three part series.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 683.
This course is designed to support the student in the beginning phases of project and/or development. Coursework focuses on creating artifacts and documenting progression towards capstone/dissertation.

EDUC 685. APPLIED PROBLEM OF PRACTICE III. 2 Credits.

Notes: part three of a three part series.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 684.
This course is designed to support the student in the secondary phases of project and/or research. In this phase of the project, students are analyzing data and beginning to finalize methods sections or final progression of project. Coursework focuses on creating artifacts and documenting progression towards capstone/dissertation.

EDUC 695. INTERNSHIP. 1-18 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit.
Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.
Practical, on-the-job experience for specialized school personnel planned cooperatively by a school district and the university. Students are selected for this experience by the university and the district in which the student is working. To register, students must make application to the program advisor during May of the previous year.

EDUC 696. COLLEGE TEACHING INTERNSHIP. 1-5 Credits.

Notes: graded Pass/No Credit.
Teaching a lower-division college course under supervision of a regular faculty member. Includes course planning, arranging bibliographical and instructional aids, conferences with students, experience in classroom instruction and student course evaluation.

EDUC 697. INTERNSHIP IN EDUCATION. 1-15 Credits.

EDUC 700. DISSERTATION/CAPSTONE IN PRACTICE. 1-4 Credits.

The dissertation/capstone has a practical focus. Under the guidance of faculty in your concentration, students will apply relevant coursework and research methods to target a problem of practice within a student’s area of interest. The purpose of the dissertation/capstone in practice is to use the skills and knowledge attained in your program. Students will present their problem of practice project to their faculty committee and cohort classmates in the final quarter of their program.

EDUC 711. SUPERINTENDENT INTERNSHIP I. 2 Credits.

Notes: first in a series of six required internship courses.
Candidates successfully complete an internship under the supervision of knowledgeable, expert practitioners that engages candidates in multiple and diverse district settings and provides candidates with coherent, authentic, and sustained opportunities.

EDUC 712. SUPERINTENDENT INTERNSHIP II. 2 Credits.

Notes: second in a series of six required internship courses.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 711.
Candidates successfully complete an internship under the supervision of knowledgeable, expert practitioners that engages candidates in multiple and diverse district settings and provides candidates with coherent, authentic, and sustained opportunities.

EDUC 713. SUPERINTENDENT INTERNSHIP III. 2 Credits.

Notes: third in a series of six required internship courses.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 712.
Candidates successfully complete an internship under the supervision of knowledgeable, expert practitioners that engages candidates in multiple and diverse district settings and provides candidates with coherent, authentic, and sustained opportunities.

EDUC 714. SUPERINTENDENT INTERNSHIP IV. 2 Credits.

Notes: fourth in a series of six required internship courses.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 713.
Candidates successfully complete an internship under the supervision of knowledgeable, expert practitioners that engages candidates in multiple and diverse district settings and provides candidates with coherent, authentic, and sustained opportunities.

EDUC 715. SUPERINTENDENT INTERNSHIP V. 2 Credits.

Notes: fifth in a series of six required internship courses.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 714.
Candidates successfully complete an internship under the supervision of knowledgeable, expert practitioners that engages candidates in multiple and diverse district settings and provides candidates with coherent, authentic, and sustained opportunities.

EDUC 716. SUPERINTENDENT INTERNSHIP VI. 2 Credits.

Notes: sixth in a series of six required internship courses.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 715.
Candidates successfully complete an internship under the supervision of knowledgeable, expert practitioners that engages candidates in multiple and diverse district settings and provides candidates with coherent, authentic, and sustained opportunities.

EDUC 717. SUPERINTENDENT PORTFOLIO I. 2 Credits.

Notes: first in a series of two required portfolio courses.
Candidates successfully complete an internship under the supervision of knowledgeable, expert practitioners that engages candidates in multiple and diverse district settings and provides candidates with coherent, authentic, and sustained opportunities.

EDUC 718. SUPERINTENDENT PORTFOLIO II. 2 Credits.

Notes: second in a series of two required portfolio courses.
Pre-requisites: EDUC 717.
Candidates successfully complete an internship under the supervision of knowledgeable, expert practitioners that engages candidates in multiple and diverse district settings and provides candidates with coherent, authentic, and sustained opportunities.

EDUC 721. EDD INTERNSHIP I. 2 Credits.

Notes: first in a series of two required internship courses.
Candidates successfully complete an internship under the supervision of knowledgeable, expert practitioners that engages candidates in multiple and diverse district settings and provides candidates with coherent, authentic, and sustained opportunities to synthesize and apply the knowledge and skills in a real-world setting.

EDUC 722. EDD INTERNSHIP II. 2 Credits.

Notes: second in a series of two required internship courses.
Candidates successfully complete an internship under the supervision of knowledgeable, expert practitioners that engages candidates in multiple and diverse district settings and provides candidates with coherent, authentic, and sustained opportunities to synthesize and apply the knowledge and skills in a real-world setting.